Speeches on Questions of Public Policy, Volum 1

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Macmillan & Company, 1868 - 582 sider
 

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Side 224 - The applause of listening senates to command, The threats of pain and ruin to despise, To scatter plenty o'er a smiling land, And read their...
Side 286 - I am aware that many object to the severity of my language; but is there not cause for severity? I will be as harsh as truth, and as uncompromising as justice. On this subject, I do not wish to think, or speak, or write, with moderation.
Side 490 - The angel of death has been abroad throughout the land ; you may almost hear the beating of his wings. There is no one, as when the first-born were slain of old, to sprinkle with blood the lintel and the two side-posts of our doors, that he may spare and pass on ; he takes his victims from the castle of the noble, the mansion of the wealthy, and the cottage of the poor and the lowly, and it is on behalf of all these classes that I make this solemn appeal.
Side 289 - Samuel, and of the prophets : who through faith subdued kingdoms, wrought righteousness, obtained promises, stopped the mouths of lions, quenched the violence of fire, escaped the edge of the sword, out of wealmess were made strong, waxed valiant in fight, turned to flight the armies of the aliens.
Side 194 - Now, whether the Union will be restored or not, or the South achieve an unhonoured independence or not, I know not, and I predict not. But this I think I know — that in a few years, a very few years, the twenty millions of freemen in the North will be thirty millions, or even fifty millions — a population equal to or exceeding that of this kingdom.
Side 171 - ... unhappily, introduced in their infant state. But previous to the enfranchisement of the slaves we have, it is necessary to exclude all further importations from Africa. Yet our repeated attempts to effect this, by prohibitions, and by imposing duties which might amount to a prohibition, have been hitherto defeated by his Majesty's negative ; thus preferring the immediate advantages of a few British corsairs, to the lasting interests of the American States, and to the rights of human nature, deeply...
Side 173 - Last year the ceremony of this great election was gone through, and the South, which had been so long successful, found itself defeated. That defeat was followed instantly by secession, and insurrection, and war. In the multitude of articles which have been before us in the newspapers within the last few months, I have no doubt you have seen it stated, as I have seen it, that this question was very much like that upon which the Colonies originally revolted against the Crown of England. It is amazing...
Side 493 - ... it will continue to give every support to Her Majesty in the prosecution of the •war, until Her Majesty shall, in conjunction with her Allies, obtain for this country a safe and honourable peace.
Side 146 - How far the promise has been in part fulfilled, we who are living now can tell. But how far it will be more largely and more completely fulfilled in after times, we^ must leave for after times to tell.
Side 532 - Vienna note ; not fewer than five members of this Cabinet have filled the office of Foreign Secretary, and therefore may be supposed capable of comprehending its meaning : it was a note drawn up by the friends of Turkey, and by arbitrators self-constituted on behalf of Turkey ; they urged its acceptance on the Russian Government, and the Russian Government accepted it ; there was then a dispute about its precise meaning, and Russia agreed, and even proposed that the arbitrators at Vienna should amend...

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