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CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND LIBERIA.

Mr. Vignaud to Mr. Gresham.

No. 193.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Paris, July 13, 1894. (Received July 30.) SIR: In its sitting of the 10th instant the Chamber of Deputies adopted without discussion the bill presented by the Government for approving the convention signed December 8, 1892, between France and Liberia. Mr. Coolidge's No. 91, of December 9, 1892, informed you of the circumstances under which this arrangement was made and gave you its English text. I now send a printed copy of the French text, as presented to the Chamber of Deputies. It does not differ from the English version. In introducing the bill Mr. Deloncle, who spoke for the Government, made only a few remarks, saying that the arrangement had been approved by the Chambers of Monrovia. He made no reference to the two special clauses, of which a copy accompanied Mr. Coolidge's dispatch. They were not made known to the chamber. I have, etc.,

HENRY VIGNAUD.

See Foreign Relations, 1893, p. 296.
FR 94—15

GERMANY.

BURDENS ON EXPORTATION OF AMERICAN HOG PRODUCTS.

Mr. Runyon to Mr. Gresham.

No. 45.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, January 29, 1894. SIR: On receipt of your instruction No. 36* of December 22 last, in reference to an application for waiver by the German Government of microscopical examination in the United States of American hog prod. ucts, I immediately brought the subject to which it relates to the attention of the Imperial German Government, in a personal interview sought by myself for the purpose with Baron von Marschall, imperial secretary of state for foreign affairs, and, while he gave no definite reply to my application, he promised an early answer. Up to this time, however, I have received none. The subject will continue to have my attention. I have, etc.,

T. RUNYON

Mr. Gresham to Mr. Runyon.

No. 52.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, February 1, 1894. SIR: I inclose for your information a copy of a letter dated the 27th ultimo, from the Secretary of Agriculture, calling attention to the excessive burdens imposed upon the exportation of American meats to Germany and France by the microscopical inspection required by the governments of those countries and to the fact that, so far as his Department has been able to learn, there has been no case of trichinosis during the last three years among the more than sixty-five millions of people inhabiting this country.

As the archives of your embassy will show, conclusive proofs of the healthfulness of American meats have been repeatedly submitted to the German Governmeut without any satisfactory results. The Department hopes that the present may be found to be a more propitious time for recalling the subject to the attention of the Government of Germany with a view to having the burdensome restrictions upon the trade in American meats removed.

Under the circumstances, you will exercise your own judgment as to the best time and manner of presenting this matter to the minister of foreign affairs, making such reference to the legislation now pending

* Not printed.

in Congress as may seem judicious, with a view to inducing the Gov. ernment of Germany to adopt a more liberal and enlightened policy with regard to the important branch of our commerce which now suffers from the restrictions in question. I am, sir, etc.,

W. Q. GRESHAM.

Mr. Runyon to Mr. Gresham.

No. 53.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, February 20, 1894. SIR: Referring to your instruction No. 52 of the 1st instant, in regard to the burdens imposed on the exportation of meat from the United States into Germany, I beg to say that (as I have already reported) the subject had, before that instruction came to my hands, had my attention. At once after the instruction referred to was received, I sought and obtained an interview with Baron von Marschall, the imperial secretary of state for foreign affairs, in which the matter was discussed at length. No decision was declared, but a promise was given that the matter should receive due consideration and that an answer should be given as soon as practicable. In the course of the conversation he informed me that the continued delay in replying to my request for information as to microscopical examination here, etc., under your instruction of June 21, last, No. 26,* was due to the necessity of obtaining information for such reply from the sovereignties composing the German Empire, inasmuch as the microscopical examination as to which inquiry is made, is, if made, made pursuant to requirements not of the Imperial Government, but pursuant to requirements of those sovereignties or of municipalities therein.

Tought here to say that I judge from his remarks that the German Government will claim that the advantages gained by it under the action of the President of the United States (proclamation of February 1, 1892), pursuant to section 3 of the act of Congress of October 1, 1890, entitled “An act to reduce the revenue and equalize the duties on imports, and for other purposes," were acquired for a consideration given by it to, and received therefor, by the United States Government, and that they will be protected accordingly in any new tariff legislation on our part.

As to the microscopical examination in the United States of pork products exported from that country into Germany, it is claimed that that inspection was voluntarily undertaken by our Government, and was understood to be one of the considerations for, and a condition of, removing the prohibition. (See the correspondence preceding and leading up to the proclamation above referred to, and the regulations of March 25, 1891, made by the Department of Agriculture pursuant to the act of March 3, 1891, entitled "An act to provide for the inspection of live cattle, hogs, and the carcasses and products thereof, which are the subject of interstate commerce, and for other purposes.") I have, etc.,

T. RUNYON.

* Not printed.

Mr. Coleman to Mr. Gresham.

No. 107.)

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, June 30, 1894. SIR: Referring to the ambassador's dispatch No. 53, of the 20th of February last, respecting his execution of the directions contained in your instruction No. 52, of the 1st of that month, relating to the desirability of the burdensome restriction which requires the microscopic inspection of meat (hog products) in the United States before shipment to Germany being removed, I have the honor to inform you that I called to-day on Baron von Rotenhan, acting secretary of state for foreign affairs, and urged dispatch in the matter, calling attention to the length of time that has elapsed without an answer having been given to the representations made by the ambassador in pursuance of your instruction.

Baron von Rotenban assured me the matter should have full atten. tion, and that the desired answer should be given at the earliest practicable moment. I have, etc.,

C. COLEMAN.

PROHIBITION OF AMERICAN CORNED BEEF.

Mr. Coleman to Mr. Gresham.

No. 125.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, July 27, 1894. (Received August 15.) SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of a note I have to-day addressed to the foreigu office remonstrating against a prohibition by the authorities of the city of Heilbronn, Würtemberg, of the sale there of American corned beef, shipped by Messrs. Armour & Co., on the ground of the alleged insufficiency of the certificate by the Department of Agriculture of the United States of the healthfulness of the article.

A copy of the certificate referred to, which was submitted to the authorities of Heilbronn by the merchant applying for permission to sell the product in question in support of his application, is also inclosed herewith.

The answer of the foreign office to the embassy's remonstrance will, when received, be promptly transmitted to the Department. I have, etc.,

CHAPMAN COLEMAN.

(Inclosure 1 in No. 125.)

Mr. Coleman to Baron Rotenhan.
EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Berlin, July 27, 1894. The undersigned, chargé d'affaires of the United States of America, has the honor to invite the attention of Baron von Rotenban, acting secretary of state for foreign affairs, to a prohibition of the sale of an important article of American trade at the city of Heilbronn, in Wür. temberg, and to request that such measures may be kindly taken as will lead to the removal of the prohibition in the event of its being found, upon investigation, to be unwarranted, as the undersigned ventures to believe it will be.

As appears from an extract, herewith inclosed, from the minutes of the common council (Gemeinderath) of the city of Heilbronn, Würtemberg, that municipal body, under date of the 5th of July instant, decreed that Mr. Paul Wohl, a merchant of that city, should not be permitted to sell American corned beef on the ground that the certificate submited by him afforded no sufficient guaranty for the complete harmlessness of the article.

In what respect the article referred to, which is issued by the Department of Agriculture of the United States, is deemed insufficient by the authorities of Heilbronn is not known to the undersigned; it appears, however, as far as he is informed, to be regarded as satisfactory elsewhere throughout Germany.

While requesting that the decree of the common council of Heilbronn may be ultimately kindly returned, the undersigned avails himself of this occasion, etc.,

CHAPMAN COLEMAN.

4094835

to

[Inclosure 2 in No. 125.–Certificate of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Duplicate certificato

of inspection of meat products for export.]
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY,

Chicago, Ill., March 31, 1894. Stamp number This is to certify that 30 bbls. of beef clods, bearing stamps num

bered as indicated on the margin hereof, which are to be exported 4094864

by Armour & Company, and are assigned to Paul Wohl, Frankfort, Mc

Germany, bave been inspected and stamped in conformity with the
requirements of the act of Congress approved March 3rd, 1891, and
that the animals from which said products came were free from
disease on post mortem examination.
Signed,
DA MELVIN,

J. STERLING MORTON,
Inspector.

Seoretary.

183

Mr. Runyon to Mr. Gresham.

No. 169.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, December 3, 1894. SIR: Referring to Mr. Coleman's dispatch No. 125, of July 27 last, I have the honor to state that I have to-day been informed by the imperial foreign office that the prohibition placed upon the sale of American canned beef by the local authorities at Heilbronn, in Würtemberg, has been removed. I have, etc.,

THEODORE RUNYON.

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