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permit the owners of cattle and horses transporting them into Mexico for grazing purposes to reimport the same into the United States at any time within twelve months from the date of the passage of the resolution.

I shall be much gratified if you will promptly bring the matter to the attention of the Mexican Government by telegraph or otherwise, as your judgment may determine best, to the end that by the concurrent action of Mexico the full benefit of the law, which by the third section of the resolution will expire January 14, 1895, may be enjoyed by those directly interested. Accept, etc.,

W. Q. GRESHAM.

Mr. Romero to Mr. Gresham.

[Translation.)

LEGATION OF MEXICO, Washington, January 19, 1894. (Received January 19.) MR. SECRETARY: To-day I had the honor to receive by mail your note of the 17th instant, with wbich you send me a certified copy of the decree (resolution) approved by the Congress of the United States and sanctioned by the President on the 15th instant, wbich authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to permit owners of cattle and horses in the United States to pass over into Mexico for the purpose of pasturing and to reimport them into the United States free of duties within twelve months from the date of the resolution, at the same time requesting me to communicate it by telegraph, or in some other manner, to my Government, to the end of obtaining its concurrence in order that those interested in this matter may enjoy the benefits which the resolution affords them.

In conformity with your wishes I to-day send by telegraph to the Mexican Government the recommendation which you make to me, and in due season I will communicate such reply as I receive.

Notwithstanding that, as I stated in our interview of the 13th instant, to which you refer in the note to which I reply, I did not regard the resolution in question as embracing any real reciprocity in favor of the Mexican stock raisers, I hope that the Government of Mexico, in order to aid the stock raisers of Texas as far as possible in their present difficult situation, will do whatever is within its competence to contribute to the accomplishment of the intentions of the Congress of the United States. Be pleased to accept, etc.,

M. ROMERO.

Mr. Romero to Mr. Gresham.

(Translation.)

LEGATION OF MEXICO, Washington, March 8, 1894. (Received March 8.) MY DEAR MR. GRESHAM: I have the honor to inform you that the Honorable Thomas M. Paschal, of Texas, having suggested to me to ask the Government of Mexico if it had come to any decision in regard to the decree of the Congress of the United States, approved by the President on the 15th of January last, permitting the free reentry into Texas of cattle grazing in Mexico, I cabled the secretary of the treasury of the Government of Mexico and received from him a reply in which he tells me that, owing to the convention on this subject which was signed by both countries on July 11, 1888, being still before the Senate of Mexico, and owing to the opposition of the Mexican border stock raisers, it has not been possible to arrive at an immediate decision on the subject. I am, etc.,

M. ROMERO

Mr. Romero to Mr. Gresham.

[Translation.)

LEGATION OF MEXICO, Washington, March 16, 1894. (Received March 16.) MR. SECRETARY: I have the honor to forward to you, with reference to your note of the 17th of January last, copy of a note from Señor Mariscal, secretary of foreign relations of the United States of Mexico, dated City of Mexico, the 5th instant, which I received to-day, in which he communicates to me the reply of the ministry of Hacienda (treasury) to the efforts made in order that the Government of Mexico should determine what is proper with regard to the decree approved by the Congress of the United States on the said 15th of January to permit the reimportation, duty free, of Texan cattle that may pass to Mexican territory for pasture. Accept, etc.,

M. ROMERO.

(Inclosure-Translation.)

Mr. Mariscal to Mr. Romero.
DEPARTMENT OF STATE, OFFICE OF FOREIGN RELATIONS,

Mexico, March 5, 1894. The secretary of the treasury (de Hacienda) telis me in a communica tion dated the 2d instant, as follows:

Your polite notes of 2d, 20th, and 22d of January last have been received at this office, in which you are pleased to transmit copies of those of our minister at Washington relative to cattle that cross the frontier to pasture on our territory and concerning the passage of the draft of a law presented to the Congress of that nation by Mr. Thomas M. Paschal, one of its members.

In reply I have the honor to inform you that as there is still pending before the Seuate a convention concluded in 1888 between Mexico and the United States for the reciprocal crossing of cattle from one country to the territory of the other, the President of the Republic does not consider it opportune to make any decision at present with regard to the decree approved by the American Congress on motion of the member, Mr. Thomas M. Paschal, because it would seem that the Executive was endeavoring to prejudge in some way an attair which the Senate has not found it convenient to take into consideration; thus the President thinks he should with all the more reason abstain from a determination in the matter, so marked is the opposition to that proposed convention by the inhabitants and representatives in the federal Congress of the frontier States, and on the other hand the same American citizens who initiated the said convention state that in May next wili cease the reasons which serve as the basis of their claim.

I copy this for you, referring to your note No. 666 of the 19th January last. I renew, etc.,

MARISCAL. FR94

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permit the owners of cattle and horses transporting them into Mexico for grazing purposes to reimport the same into the United States at any time within twelve months from the date of the passage of the resolution.

I shall be much gratified if you will promptly bring the matter to the attention of the Mexican Government by telegraph or otherwise, as your judgment may determine best, to the end that by the concurrent action of Mexico the full benefit of the law, which by the third section of the resolution will expire January 14, 1895, may be enjoyed by those directly interested. Accept, etc.,

W. Q. GRESHAM.

Mr. Romero to Mr. Gresham,

[Translation.)

LEGATION OF MEXICO, Washington, January 19, 1894. (Received January 19.) MR. SECRETARY: To-day I had the honor to receive by mail your note of the 17th instant, with wbich you send me a certified copy of the decree (resolution) approved by the Congress of the United States and sanctioned by the President on the 15th instant, which authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to permit owners of cattle and horses in the United States to pass over into Mexico for the purpose of pasturing and to reimport them into the United States free of duties within twelve months from the date of the resolution, at the same time requesting me to communicate it by telegraph, or in some other manner, to my Government, to the end of obtaining its concurrence in order that those interested in this matter may enjoy the benefits which the resolution affords them.

In conformity with your wishes I to-day send by telegraph to the Mexican Government the recommendation which you make to me, and in due season I will communicate such reply as I receive.

Notwithstanding that, as I stated in our interview of the 13th instant, to which you refer in the note to which I reply, I did not regard the resolution in question as embracing any real reciprocity in favor of the Mexican stock raisers, I hope that the Government of Mexico, in order to aid the stock raisers of Texas as far as possible in their present difficult situation, will do whatever is within its competence to contribute to the accomplishment of the intentions of the Congress of the United States. Be pleased to accept, etc.,

M. ROMERO

Mr. Romero to Mr. Gresham.

(Translation.]

LEGATION OF MEXICO, Washington, March 8, 1894. (Received March 8.) MY DEAR MR. GRESHAM: I have the honor to inform you that the Honorable Thomas M. Paschal, of Texas, having suggested to me to ask the Government of Mexico if it had come to any decision in regard to the decree of the Congress of the United States, approved by the President on the 15th of January last, permitting the free reentry into Texas of cattle grazing in Mexico, I cabled the secretary of the treasury of the Government of Mexico and received from him a reply in which he tells me that, owing to the convention on this subject which was signed by both countries on July 11, 1888, being still before the Senate of Mexico, and owing to the opposition of the Mexican border stock raisers, it has not been possible to arrive at an immediate decision on the subject. I am, etc.,

M. ROMERO.

Mr. Romero to Mr. Gresham,

[Translation.]

LEGATION OF MEXICO, Washington, March 16, 1894. (Received March 16.) MR. SECRETARY: I have the honor to forward to you, with reference to your note of the 17th of January last, copy of a note from Señor Mariscal, secretary of foreign relations of the United States of Mexico, dated City of Mexico, the 5th instant, which I received to-day, in which he communicates to me the reply of the ministry of Hacienda (treasury) to the efforts made in order that the Government of Mexico should determine what is proper with regard to the decree approved by the Congress of the United States on the said 15th of January to permit the reimportation, duty free, of Texan cattle that may pass to Mexican territory for pasture. Accept, etc.,

M. ROMERO.

(Inclosure-Translation.]

Mr. Mariscal to Mr. Romero.
DEPARTMENT OF STATE, OFFICE OF FOREIGN RELATIONS,

Mexico, March 5, 1894. The secretary of the treasury (de Hacienda) tells me in a communica tion dated the 2d instant, as follows:

Your polite notes of 20, 20th, and 22d of January last have been received at this office, in which you are pleased to transmit copies of those of our minister at Washington relative to cattle that cross the frontier to pasture on our territory and concerning the passage of the draft of a law presented to the Congress of that nation by Mr. Thomas M. Paschal, one of its members.

In reply I have the honor to inform you that as there is still pending before the Senate a convention concluded in 1888 between Mexico and the United States for the reciprocal crossing of cattle from one country to the territory of the other, the President of the Republic does not consider it opportune to make any decision at present with regard to the decree approved by the American Congress on motion of the member, Mr. Thomas M. Paschal, because it would seem that the Executive was endeavoring to prejudge in some way an affair which the Senate has not found it convenient to take into consideration; thus the President thinks he should with all the more reason abstain from a determination in the matter, so marked is the opposition to that proposed convention by the inhabitants and representatives in the federal Congress of the frontier States, and on the other hand the same American citizens who initiated the said convention state that in May next will cease the reasons which serve as the basis of their claim.

I copy this for you, referring to your note No. 666 of the 19th Jan

uary last.

MARISCAL.

I renew, etc.,
FR 94.

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RECOVERY OF STRAYED OR STOLEN CATTLE.

Mr. Uhl to Mr. Gray.

No. 234.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, June 16, 1894. SIR: I inclose herewith copy of a letter from Hon. T. M. Paschal, a member of Congress from Texas, covering communications from Mr. J. C. Loving, secretary of the Cattle Raisers' Association of that State, and Mr. Robert W. Prosser, relative to the unsuccessful efforts of the latter to recover a horse stolen from him and held by the Mexican authorities in Ciudad Porfirio Diaz.

Mr. Paschal lias been informed that no treaty stipulation in regard to the recovery of straying or stolen stock exists between the United States and Mexico, and, in the absence of exceptional regulation of the matter, owners of such stock on either side of the border have the same access to the courts of the other country in substantiation of their claim to ownership as citizens of the country.

A convention on the subject was signed at Washington by Mr. Bayard and Mr. Romero June 11, 1888, and was ratified, with amendments, by the Senate of the United States on October 1, 1888. By the fifth article thereof it was stipulated that,

When cattle belonging in one country have been stolen and driven by thieves to the territory of the other, and subsequently recovered by the proper authorities, they shall be held for return to their lawful owner when he shall appear, in which case no duty shall be payable, and no charges save for the keep of the cattle.

This convention has not yet been ratified by Mexico.

It is the Department's desire that you confer with the minister for foreign attairs, to the end of seeking a remedy for the state of things represented in the inclosed correspondence, and ascertaining the disposition of the Mexican Government in regard to the uncompleted convention of 1888.

In this connection I refer you to Department's instruction to your predecessor, No. 523, of May 25, 1891, and his reply, No. 657, of the 2d of the following month. I am, etc.,

EDWIN F. UHL,

Acting Secretary.

THE BALDWIN CLAIM.

Mr. Romero to Mr. Gresham.

[Translation.)

LEGATION OF MEXICO, Washington, February 17, 1894. (Received February 19.) MR. SECRETARY: Referring to the conversations which we have had in relation to the claim that has been laid before the U. S. Government by Mrs. Baldwin, wife of a citizen of the United States who was murdered in Durango, Mexico, and to the efforts which have been made by the U. S. legation to induce the Mexican Government to pay an indemnity to that lady, I have the honor to apprise you that I have received

i Not printed.

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