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31 Days. Sun on Mer. D. H. M. S. 1 11 49 232 9 11 52 443

17 11 56 32 5 33 even. | 25 ev. 0 31

| Day of Month.

Day of Week.
Charleston.
9 32 even.
1 23 even.
6 7 even.
H. M.

Sun's decl. s.

Moon's Place.

minim December tukes its naine troma decem, ten. It is one of the Calendar for

Calendar for Calendar for Calendar for most unpleasant months in the

Bost-n;
New-York City;

Baltim re. Charleston;
whole year. The gloom out of

New-England, Neic-Connecticut, N. Jersey, Virginia, Ken-North Carolina, Ten-
doors is, bowever, compensntes York State, Msich. Pennsylvania, Ohio, tucky, f. Mis- | nessee. Georgia, Ala.
by the enjoyments of the warm
firedo
Wisconsin f Iowa. Indiana of Illinois. SOIL/2.

Mississippi of La.
DAILY RECORD.

Sun Sun Moon H.w.Sun Sun Moon H.W. Sun, Sun Moon Sun Sun Moon H. w.
rises sets. sets, Bostn rises sets. sets. N. Y. rises sets. sets. | rises sets. rises. Ch'n.

Baltimore.
945 even.
1 36 even.
6 20 even.
5 46 even.

H. M.
DECEMBER, 18 4 5.

New-York.

9 56 even.
1 47 even.
6 31 even.
5 57 even.

H. M.
Boston.

8 even.
1 59 even.
6 43 even.
6 9 even.

H. M.
5 10
D.
13

28 12th Month. MOON'S PHASES. First Quarter....

Full Moon..... Third Quarter. New Moon...

D. M.

H.M. H.M. H. M. H. M.H.M. H.M. H. M.H. MH.M. H.M. H. M.H.M.H.M.H. M. H. M.
1 M 21 53 13 | Alex. of Russia died, 1825.17 12 4 26 7 5 0 1117 7 4 31 7 1010 1117 34 35 7 146 47 4 52 7 30 8 47
2 Tu 22 2 15 Battle of Austerlitz, 1805.7 13 4 26 8 17 O 477 84 31 8 21 10 5717 4 4 351 8 2516 474 521 8 38 9 33
3W 22 10. Jupiter South 9 9.

7 14 261 9 29 1 3317 94 31 9 33 11 4617 5 4 35 9 3516 484 52 9 45 10 22
4 Th 22 18 w Seven stars South 10 43. 7 15 4 26 10 40 2 227 10.4 31 10 43 morn. 7 614 35 10 446 49 4 52 10 50 11 13
5 Fr 22 267
[Island taken 1776.7 16 4 25 11 49 3 137 11 4 3111 51

0 377

74 35 11 516 50 4 52 11 54 morn. 6 Sa 22 33 Van Buren b. 1782. Rhode 7 17 4 25 morn. 4

8.17 12 4 31 morn.

1 3217

84 35 morn. 6 514 52 morn. 0 8 7 E 22 40 r1|2d Sunday in Advent. 7 18 4 25 O 56 5 67 13 4 30 0 56 2 30||7 9 4 35 0 566 51 4 52 0 55 1 6 8M 22 471 T

7 194 25 2 2 6 1517 14 4 30 2 1 3 3917 10.4 35 2 016 524 52 1 55 2 15
9 Tu 22 528
Milton born, 1608.

7 2014 251 3 6 7 24 7 15 4 30 3 4 4 4817 11 4 35 3 26 53 4 52 2 54 3 24
10 W 22 58 7 Seven stars south 10 20. 7 21 4 25 4 8 8 347 164 31 4 5 5 5817 124 35 4 316 54 4 523 524 34
11 Th 23

3 8 Gay, the poet, died, 1782. 7 22 4 25 5 8 9 357 174 31 5 5 6 5917 12 4 35 5 216 544 53 4 49 5 35
12 Fr 23

7 11 Seven stars South 10 12. 7 234 25 6 5 10 24 17 17 4 31 6 1 7 4817 13 4 35 5 5816 554 53 5 43 6 24
13 Sa 23 12 Dr. Johnson died, 1784. 7 24 4 261 rises. 11 817 18 4 31 rises. 8 32 7 14 4 35 rises. 16 56 4 53 rises. 7 8
14 E 23 15 Washington died, 1799. 7 24 4 26 5 37 11 477 19 4 31 5 42 9 11 7 15 4 35 5 461|6 574 53 6 1 7 47
15 M 23 18

Jupiter South 8 19. 7 25 4 26 6 31 ev. 257 20 4 31 6 36! 9 4917 15 4 36 6 4016 574 54 6 54 8 25
16 Tu 23 21 0 Great fire in N. Y. 1835. 7 2614 26 7 28 0 587 20 4 32 7 32 10 22 7 16 4 36 7 356 5814 54 7 47 8 58
17 W 23 23 Bolivar died, 1830. 7 264 27 8 25 1 33 7 21 4 32 8 28110 57|17 17 4 36 8 316 59 4 54 8 40 9 33
18 Th 23 25

7 274 271 9 23 2 77 22 4 32 9 25 11 317 17 4 37 9 276 59 4 55 9 34 10 7
19 Fr|23 26 Louisiana purchased, 1803.7 28 4 27 10 21 2 4217 22 4 33 10 23 ev. 617 18 4 37 10 24 7 04 53 10 27 10 42
20 Sa 23 27 m

(Advent. 17 284 28 11 20 3 2017 23 4 33/11 21 0 447 19 4 38 11 2117 04 56 11 22 11 20
21 E 23 27 m St. Thomas. 4th Sunday in 7 29 4 28 morn. 3 59 7 234 34 morn.

1 2317 19 4 38 morn 17 1 4 56 morn. 11 59
22 M 23 27 - Jupiter South 7 51. 17 294 29 O 21 4 447 24 4 34 0 21 2 817 20 4 39 0 2017 114 57 0 17ev. 44
23 Tu 23 27 3 Newton born, 1642.

17 304 29 1 24 5 417 24 4 35 1 23 3 517 20 4 39 1 217 2/4 57 1 151 1 41
24 W 23 26 m Seven stars South 9 24. 7 304 30 % 29 6 517 25 4 35 2 27 4 157 214 401 2 2517 2 4 58 2 16 2 51
25 Th23 24 m Christmas.

7 314 31 3 36 8 07 25 4 36 3 33 5 24 7 21 4 40 3 31 7 3 4 58 3 19 4 0
26 Fr 23 22 f St. Stephen.

7 314 31 4 44 9 817 25 4 37 4 401 6 3217 21 4 41 4 3717 34 59 4 23 5 8
27 Sa 23 20 i ||St. John.
7 31 4 32 5 51 10 57 26 4 37 5 46 7 297 2214 41 5 437

315 01 5 28 6 5
28 E 23 17 19 Innocents.
7 324 33 sets. 10 56.7 26 4 38 sets. 8 2017 22 4 42 sets. 117 45

0 sets.

6 56 29 M 23 13 13 The Java taken, 1812. 7 324 33 5 53 11 46 7 264 39 5 57 9 1017 224 431 6 17 45 1 6 16 7 46 30 Tu 23 9 w

7 32 4 34 7 8 morn.!7 264 40 7 12 10 2117 22 4 44 7 1517 415 21 7 261 8 38 W 23

5ml Seven stars South 8 56. 17 3214 35 8 23) 0:38/7 2714 401 8 25 10 48117 23 4 44 8 28117 21 8 35 9 24

17

THE PAST AND THE FUTURE.

The year 1844, just ended, has witnessed fover to the opposite party; thousands were one of the most extraordinary Political contests Naturalized expressly to oppose Nativism, that ever occurred. So nice and equal a bal- and voted the Polk tickets mainly to that end; ance of parties, so aniversal and intense an in- thousands more, we have good reason to beterest

, so desperate and protracted a struggle, lieve, voted that way without being naturalare entirely without parallel. The result, ized at all. Mr. Polk on this single question though showing a large preponderance of gained more than enough votes in the State of

Electoral Votes for the victorious party, exhib- New-York to elect him.
its no corresponding disparity of moral or nu- But all the losses sustained by the Whigs
merical strength. James K. Polk is chosen through Fraudulent Voting, with the diver.
President by less than an absolute majority of sions from their ranks by Abolitiou and repug-
the People's Votes. Allow him Fifty Thou-nance to Nativism, would have been unavail.
sand more than Clay, in a Vote of Three Mil- ing, had the People been permitted to know
lions, and there are still to be considered the what were the main questions in difference
Sixty-odd Thousand votes thrown away on between the two great parties, and so to de.
the Birney or Abolition ticket-every one op- cide intelligently upon them. But this Loco-
posed to Polk's views on the Texas Question, Focoism resisted and prevented. It could
and nine-tenths of them in favor of the Protec- not do otherwise and not be beaten. There-
tion of Home Industry, and Whigs in every fore, while its public meetings, its speakers,
thing but their Political hostility to Slavery. its journals, in the South, were open, bold and

So that, while one party has secured the Of- ardent in their advocacy of the Immediate
fices and the Executive power, there is a clear Annexation of Texas to this Country, regard.

popular majority for the Principles and Mea- less of consequences, this question was wide. sures of its antagonist.

ly declared at the North to be by no means But this is only an item. James K. Polk distinctly or decisively in issue. The Eveowes his election to the Birney or Liberty ning Post, the most respectable and influential Party. Had there been no such party, draw. Polk paper in this City, repudiated the issue ing its votes nine-tenths from the Whig ranks, and opposed Annexation. Silas Wright, who Mr. Clay would have received at least the had powerfully opposed the Texas Treaty in votes of New-York and Michigan, in addition the Senate, was made the Polk candidate for to those actually cast for him, giving him 146 Governor of New York, by which nomination votes to Polk's 129. To Birney and Co. there- the Van Buren anti-Texas men were drawn fore, is the Country indebted for the election into the support of Polk, New York carried of Polk, and an Annexation, anti-Tariff ascen- for him, and his election secured. Thus while dency in the Federal Government.

Texas gained for Polk the votes of Georgia Yet Abolition alone could not have made a and Louisiana, the game was so played as not sufficient diversion in favor of Loco-Focoism to lose him a single Northern vote. to defeat Mr. Clay. Native Americanism, or On the Tariff question the fraud planned the apprehension studiously inculcated by and perpetrated to prevent a clear popular Mr. Polk's partisans that the Whigs, if suc-verdict was still more glaring. In the first cessful, would abolish or greatly restrict the place, a resolution, which might be interpreted privilege of becoming citizens now accorded to mean any thing or nothing, was passed at to Immigrants from Foreign Countries, struck the Convention by which Polk and Dallas us a hard blow. Thousands of Adopted Citi. were nominated. The Free Traders interzens, heretofore Whigs, were impelled to golpreted it as declaring hostility to all Protective

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Legislation. The Tariff men in the party re- up to the Nation as a gambler, a profane garded it as meaning practically just nothing swearer, and a general profligate in morals at all. Thus both were satisfied. Coming and life, while those who had through twenty before the People, those of the Cotton States years supported and idolized Crawford and were assured that Mr. Polk was a genuine Jackson, each of whom had killed his man in Free Trader, and his votes and speeches in personal encounter, while Jackson had tried Congress and on the stump were cited to hard to kill the two Bentons without even the prove it. At the same time, Pennsylvania formalities of a combat, were horrified at Mr. and other Tariff States were assured that Polk Clay's bloodless and regretted duels! The was for moderate and reasonable Protection contest was widely represented as one beto Home Industry, and a letter from him to tween a dueling and an anti-dueling candidate, John K. Kane of Philadelphia (the only avow. and thousands were on this ground induced al of principle he made for the public eye' to vote against their own views of National

after his nomination) was produced to prove Policy and practical beneficence. If an unit. This letter was written after the pattern just seizure of foreign territory, resulting in of the Baltimore Resolution aforesaid, and, war and ten thousand deaths, shall be the rewliile it looked toward a Protective Tariff, sult of this squeamishness, on whom will rest was cautiously worded so as not to give um- the responsibility ? brage to the Free Traders. Thus Georgia

But Calumny and Fraud have done their and Alabama supported Mr. Polk as the con

work, and Mr. Clay is defeated. That is the sistent, uncompromising enemy of the Protec

extent of the verdict. Would that its consetive Policy, while Pennsylvania and the

quences might extend no farther than their Wool-growing or Manufacturing sections of

authors intended! The People have not in. New-York and other Free States were assu

tended to decide against a Protective Tariff red that he was as favorable to Protection as

nor in favor of the Annexation of Texas ; and Mr. Clay! In Pittsburgh and vicinity, he

yet both these are among the probable results was even commended as more favorable to

of Polk's election. The Sub-Treasury proProtection than his great competitor! No ex

ject, if there be any sincerity and consistency penditure of sophistry or falsehood was deem

in the victors, must also be revived and press ed too great to cover this weak point of their

ed upon the Country. Mr. Polk stands exline of defence. The success was such as ill.

pressly and publicly committed to it; his chief deserving often meets in the outset. The ap.advisers are Calhoan, Van Buren, Woodbury,

prehensions of the Tariff section of the party &c. Pride of opinion and the taunts of the were entirely lalled to rest, and Mr. Polk re.

more reckless Destructives will probably com. ceived large majorities in nearly every Iron

pel the party,' however reluctantly, to march County of New York, New-Jersey and Penn

ap to the line of its former professions. Those, sylvania. Let us see the end before we con. therefore, who hope for a quiet, peaceful, clude that such iniquity has prospered.

conservative Administration. are doomed to And yet so palpable was the cheat prac. disappointment. Mr. Polk is not the man to ticed upon the Tariff section of Mr. Polk's rise superior to the circumstances by which supporters that it seemed hardly possible that he finds himself surrounded. He will submit it should succeed. No intelligent man coulil to be moulded and governed by them. He be deceived by it, and even the ignorant sus. must carry Proscription down to low water pected while they yielded to it. But the old mark, for the hungry pack behind him will prejudices, the old hatreds, the old slanders, have it so. He must press the Annexation of against Mr. Clay, were vehemently invoked, Texas, for those who forced his nomination at and new and grosser calumnies were invent- Baltimore regard this as the primary consided for the occasion, to be credited on the eration, and chose him for his known devotion strength of the old ones. Mr. Clay was held to their darling scheme. He must do liis best

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40

250....93

to undermine and overthrow the Protective | hold Plaquemines, an old Parish, not rapidly features of the Tariff, all the time talking increasing its population, lying below New. smooth generalities and specious clap-trap Orleans, toward the mouth of the Mississippi. about equalizing the burthens of the Govern- Here the vote has been swelled after this exment,' .equal Protection,' 'correcting the ex-traordinary fashion :

1840. cesses of former legislation,' &c. while sapping

1842.

1843. 1844.

Whig.Loco. Whig. Loco. Whig. Loco. Clay. Poll, the great bulwark of the National well-being.

179....36 310....37 1007. In short, the new Administration will be com

The vote for Polk exceeds the whole numpelled, by the original sin attending its con- ber of white males of all ages in the Parish in ception, to war at once upon the Public Inte- 1840, although Louisiana exacts a Property rests and the Public Faith.

qualification of her voters! And the excess. What, then, is the duty of the Whigs ?- ive majority for Polk over that given for his Evidently, to stand fast by their Principles party at any former Election has given him and their Country. They should offer no fac the vote of the State. In other words if tious opposition to the new dynasty--no op. Plaquemines had given no more than her honposition for opposition's sake.

But they

est vote, the Electoral Vote of Louisiana

would have been cast for Clay. should renew and perfect their organization, That this vote of Plaquemines was abomina. be vigilant in the diffusion of facts and argu.bly fraudulent rests on no inference or calcu ments bearing on the great questions which lation. John Gibney, steward of the steammust continue to divide the Country, maintain com New Orleans with a full load of passen

boat Agnes, swears that the boat went down their ascendency wherever the majority is gers, under the charge of Judge Leonard, (the with them, and strengthen their ranks in Con- great man of Plaquemines;) that he himself, gress so far as possible. To these ends no

a minor, not residing in Plaquemines, being noisy or vehement effort is requisite. Let at different Polls in that Parish-every time

persuaded by the Captain, voted three times them but adhere firmly to their principles and for Polk and Dallas. Dr. J. B. Wilkinson, a their measures, discarding all solicitations to yoter of Plaguemines, swears that he noticed disband and adopt new names and new pur-hour, and were then surrounded by a crowd

that the Polls were opened before the legal poses. Thus prepared, thus guarded, let of strangers, one of whom he ventured to chal. them patiently, hopefully bide their time.- lenge; but, as the Clerk reached out the book, The punishment of the temporarily successful

the Sheriff' pulled it away, declaring that nc.

body should be sworn! After this the foreign frauds and deceptions of 1844 cannot fail to votes went in pell-mell. Alfred Vail, a pasbe signal and certain.

senger, and E. Seymour Austin, pilot of the

Agnes, swear to a state of facts within their Were the Whigs beaten by Fraud : knowledge similar to that sworn to by Jolin

Gibney. Albert Savage, Engineer of the If any man doubts that systematic, enor- steamboat Planter, swears that his boat went mous, atrocious frauds were perpetrated in down with one hundred and forty Loco-Focos our late Election, and that James K. Polk is from New Orleans, who voted after the fashion chosen President by virtue of these frauds, --it being a Clay one,it was refused, the

above described ; but when he offered a vote we ask his attention to the following facts : Sheriff saying he would swear him! Paul

The total vote of Louisiana in the vehement Cormen testifies that he went with other contest of 1840 was 18,912; in the late Elec. Whigs to vote, but were deterred by seeing tion it was 26,295---an increase of about thirty- room, wounded, bloody, and without his hat,

Charles Bruland driven out of the voting five per cent. Accordingly, it will be found having been beaten by the Sheriff for offering by a scrutiny of the Parish returns that the a Whig vote. There being a large Loco-Foco increase averages very nearly that ratio-a threatening, the few Whigs were obliged to

mob around the Polls, excited, swearing and little higher in the new and rapidly growing leave without voting. Parishes; a little lower in those that are old This is the way one Statc was carried for and stationary ; though the strong Loco-Foco Polk and Dallas. Had we room, we could Parishes are apt to swell their vote the most. carried by means equally foul and flagitious.

satisfy any candid mind that New York was The single exception is the Loco-Foco strong--Can such victories profit the winners ?

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18

VOTES FOR PRESIBENT AND VICE PRESIDENT.

.162

1808

PRESIDENT.
VICE PRESIDENT.

PRESIDENT.

VICE PRESIDENT. SGeo. Washington.63 John Adams. 1788

84 ( Audiew Jackson. 99 John C. Calhoun......182 (Unanimous.) (Scattering).

35 John Q. Adams $ 84 | Five others ...
1824

78
77
Geo.Washington 132 Jolin Adnins..

W. H. Crawford 41 (J. Q. Adams elected Pre1792 (Unanimous.) George Clinton

50

Henry Clay...... 37 sident by House of Rep.) T. Jefferson 4, Burr.

Audiew Jarkson 178 Lobo C. Calhoun... 1828

.173 John Adams..... 71 Thomas Pinckney. 1736 Lohos. Sefferson.: 68 Aaron Burr...

John Q. Adans. 83 | Richard Rush

833 50 Andrew Jackson219 | Martin Van Buren....189 1800 Thos. Jeiterson.. 73 | Aaaro Burrt.

73 Henry Clay...... 49 Joon Serveant.. 49 John Adarns..... 64 Thomas Pinckney 50 1832 John Fiord...... 11 | William Wilkins...... 30 1801 Thos. Jetier-on..162 George Clinton..

Pi William Wirt... Henry Lee.. Chas.C.Píockney 14 Rufus King...

11 14

Amos Elinaker...
Jarn Madison..162 | George Clinton. .118 Martin Van B'n.170 Richard M. Johnson...147
Chas. C. Pinckne: 45 Rufus King..

W H Harrison. 73 Fiancis Granger.... 77 James Madison..127 | Elbridge Ger y. 128 1836 Hugh L. White. 26 Joon Tyler... 1812

47 De Witt Clinton. 8? Jared Ingersollt.

** i Daniel Webster.. 14William Sanith... 23 1816

James Monroe...183 Daniel I. Tompkin's...183 (W. P. Mangum. il
Rufus King...... 34 (Oppos tion scattering)

W.H. Harrison.234 John Tyler

.234 James Monroe...218 | Daniel D. Tomokins... 218 1840 Martin Van B'n. 60 Richard M. Johnson... 48 1820 No opp.but l votell) (Opposition scattering)

Har 19 Sts. V. B'n 7 Poik 1, Tazewell. 11 1844

Janes K. Poik.. 170 George M Dallas......170

Henry Cray......105 | Theo. Frelinghuysen..105 * At the four first elections, no discrimination was made bety: een votes for President and Vice President; each elector voting for two candidates, and the highest on the poll being President and the next Vire Rres de t.

+ Under the Constitution as it then stood, there was no choice for President; the volcs for Jetien on and Burr, the Demo ratic candidatės, being equal. The House, after a protracted and most exciting struggle. elected Mr. Jetierson President; whereupon Burr became Vice President.

Mr. Ingersoll eceivsed only the Federal votes; Mr. Clinton those of New York in addition.
|| Gov. Wm. Plumer, of N. H. voted for J. Q. Adams, who was not a candidate.
$ In the House of Representatives, Adama received the votes of 13 States, Jackson of 7, Crawford of 4.

P South Carolina voied for Ex-Gov. Floyd of Virginia, and H. Lee of Boston. Pennsylvania voted for Jakson, but eschewed Va · Buren, und cast her vote for Wilkins. Vermont voted for Wirt und Ellmaker, (Anti-Masonic.)

**Tennessee and Georgia voted for White and Tyler; Maryland for llarrison and Trler: South Carolina for Maugum and Tyler; Massachusetts for Webster and Granger, Virginia for Martin

Van Buren und Judge Smith of Alabama. Col. R. M, Johnson having just half the votes for Vice-President, the Senate proceeded to elect; whereupon Col. Johnson received 33 votes and Francis Granger 16.

VOTES OF NEW YORK FOR PRESIDENT. 1932-Andrew Jackson..,

.168,497 Clay and Wirt.... 1836-Martin Van Buren....

.166,815 William H. Harrison 1840-William H. Harrison..

.225,817 Martin Van Buren.. James G. Birney.

2,808 1844-James K. Polk..

237,588 Henry Clay

James G. Birney.

.154,896 .138,543 .212,527

.232,482

15,812

3337

2.332

NEW-YORK ELECTIONS SINCE 1789. Statement of Votes cast in this State for Governor, at the several Electians of Chief Magistrate, since the

adoption of the Federal Constitution. Year. Candidates. Votes. Mojority. Year. Candidntes.

Votes. 1789-George Clinton..

6,391
1824-D= Witt Clinton....

Majority.
Robert Yates..
5,962

103,452 429 Samuel Young..

.87,003 1792-George Clinton.

8,440
1826–De Witt Cl nton.

16,359
John Jay
.8,332*

99,785

108 William B. Roche ter...96,13 1795 Jon Joy.

13,481
1823-Martin Van Buren..

3,650 .11,892

136,794
Robert Yates..

1,589
Smith Timpson..

106,441 1798-John Jav..

16,012
Soloinoa Southwick..

30,350

3,345 Robert R. Livingston.. .13,632

2,380 1830- Enos T. Throop.

128,842 1801-George Clinton..

.24,803

Francis Granger. 120,361 Stephen Van Rensselaer..20,843 3,965

8,481

Ezekiel Williams. 1804-Morgan Lewis...

30,823
1832-William L. Marcy

166,410
Aaron Burr.

8,690

Francis Granger 1807-Daniel D. Tompkins.. 35,074

1834-William L. Marey.

.156,672

9,738

181,900 Morgan Lewis..

.30,989

4,085

William H. Seward....169,008 1810—Daniel D. Tompkins.

.43,034
1836-William L. Murcy

13,892 Jonas Piatt.

36,481
6,610

166,122
Jesse Buel.

.126,648 1813-Daniel D. Tompkins

43,324
Isaac S. S nith....

23,474 Stephen Van Rensselaer..39,713

3,606 1838-William H. Seward..

....3,496 45,412

192,882 1816-Daniel D. Tompkins.

Willinm L. Marcy.....182,461
Rufus King

28,647
6,765 1840-Williain H. Seward.

10,421 1817-De Wit Clinton..

.43,310

William C. Bouck. 216, 26
Peter B. Po ter.

.1,417
41,891

5,285

Gerrit Smith. 1820-De Witt C!nton.

47,447

1842-Willian C. Bouck. .45,990 Daniel D. Tompkins...

.208,072 1,457 Luther Brudish. 186,091

21,981 (New Constitution.

Alvan Stewart..

7,203 1822-Joseph C. Yates....

128,493
1844-Silas "right

.241,090 Solomon Southwick......2,910 ....125,583

Miliard Fillmore. .231,057

10,033 Aivan Stewart.

.lə, 119 * Votes of Otsego and Tioga Counties rejected, which it is said would have reversed the majority.

.22,139

222,011

....

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