The Power "to Coin" Money: The Exercise of Monetary Powers by the Congress

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M.E. Sharpe, 1992 - 272 sider
This book traces the history from colonial times to the present of the monetary powers exercised by the Congress under the Constitution. It follows the evolution of the American banking and monetary system from the perspective of specific provisions in the Constitution that authorize the government to coin money and regulate its value. The author critically examines how far the development of the contemporary money and banking system has pushed beyond the narrow powers spelled out in the Constitution. He shows how changes in congressional legislation, Supreme Court decisions on precedent-setting cases, and the evolution of central banking powers within the Federal Reserve System have expanded the scope of the federal government's monetary powers. Yet, the author views this history within the context of private limits to the authority of Congress and the Congress's distrust of lodging the central bank within the Executive branch, preferring instead to respect an independent central banking tradition. The Hamiltonian tradition, he concludes, still offers the best institutional arrangement to confront unstable markets and destabilizing political influence.
 

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Innhold

Introduction
iii
The Scope of Monetary Policy
xiii
Interpreting the Constitution
25
Roots of the Constitutions Monetary Provisions
43
Drafting the Monetary Provisions of the Constitution
65
Establishing the Bank of the United States
79
Federal Coins and State Bank Notes
103
Federal Bills of Credit
127
National Currency System
141
Creation and Control of the Federal Reserve System
165
Managing an Elastic Supply of Bills of Credit
193
A Supreme Court of Finance
219
INDEX
239
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
259
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