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ENERAL Instruction for Speaking

7

Eloquence

PERKINS 30

Speech in Congress, 1789

WASHINGTON 34

Speech of a Roman General

P. EMILUS 36

Exhortation on Temperance in Pleasure

BLAIR 38

Judah's Plea for Benjamin, before Joseph

PHILO 41

Plea in behalf of Thomas Muir

MUIR 43

On the starry Heavens

HERVEY 44

Paper, a Poem

FRANKLIN 46

Speech before the Roman Senate

CATO 48

Speech of an Indian Chief

54

On the Creation of the World

BLAIR 55 -

Lines spoken by a little Boy

EVERETT 57

Speech in the British Parliament, 1766

PITT 58

Scene from the Farce of Lethe

GARRICK 61

Eulogy on Dr. Franklin

FAUCHEF 64

Epilogue to Addison's Cato

69

Self Conceit, an Address by a small Boy

Dialogue

between Howard and Lester

Christ's Crucifixion

CUMBERLAND 74,

The Wonders of Nature

HERVEY 77

Dialogue on Physiognomy

79

Oration at the Festival of Gratitude

CARNOT 82

Address to the President of the United States ADET 85

President's Answer

WASHINGTON 87

The oppressive Landlord, a Dialogue

88

Speech in the British Parliament, 1770 MANSFIELD 94

On the Day of Judgment

DAVIES 97

Christ triumphant over the apostate Angels MILTON 100

Slaves in Barbary, a Drama in two Acts EVERETT 102

Speech in the British Parliament, 1770

Pitt 119

Plea before a Roman Court

SOCRATES 122

Dialogue on Cowardice and Knavery

- 126

Speech in the British Parliament

SHERIDAN 130

Extract from an Oration against Catiline

CICERO 131

Description of the first American Congress BARLOW 133

Speech of a French General to his army

BUONAPARTE 135

Reflections over the Grave of a Young Man HERVEY 136

Scene from the Drama of “ Moses in the Bulrushes" H. MORE 137

Speech of a Roman General

C. CASSIUS 142

Speech in the British Parliament, 1784.

ERSKINE 144

Address to the People of the U. States WASHINGTON 147

Dialogue on the Choice of Business for Life

- 150

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Speech of a French General

BUONAPARTE 154

Speech in the British Parliament, 1777

Pitt 156

Dialogue between a Schoolmaster and School-Committee - 158

Speech in the British Parliament, 1770

PITT 165

On the general Judgment-Day,

DWIGHT 169

On the Works of Creation and Providence HERVEY 171

Speech in the British Parliament

Fox 172

The Conjurer, a Dialogue

EVERETT 175

Speech in the British Parliament, 1775

Pitt 184

Speech of the Caledonian General

GALGACHUS 185

Modern Education, a Dialogue

189

On the Existence of God, a Sermon

Maxcy 195

The Dignity of Human Nuture

BURGES 203

Infernal Conference

CUMBERLAND 205

Speech in the British Parliament, 1777

Pirt 214

On the Day of Judgment

YOUNG 217

The dissipated Oxford Student Altered from BURNEY 219

Speech in Congress, on the British Treaty

AMES 230

Oration on Independence, July 4, 1796

BLAKE 234

General Description of America, a Poem EVERETT 2.37

Dialogue between a Master and Slave

AIKIN 240

Speech in the Irish Parliament

O'CONNOR 243

Scene from the Tragedy of Tamerlane

ROWE 248

Speech in the British Parliament

BARRE 252

The Last Day

EVERETT 254

Dialogue on Loquacity

257

American Sages

BARLOW 261

Speech in the British Parliament, 1777

Pitr 262

Scene from the Tragedy of Cato

ADDISON 265

Oration delivered at Boston, July 4, 1794 PHILLIPS 268

Dialogue between a White Man and an Indian EVERETT 269

Oration, pronounced at Boston, July 4, 1796 LATHROP 272

Dialogue between Edward and Harry

EVERETT 275

David and Goliath

H. MORE 278

Oration on the Powers of Eloquence

- 281

Dialogue on Civilization

289

Oration on the Manumission of Slaves

MILLER 293

A Forensic Dispute

EVERETT 295

Oration delivered at Boston, March 5th, 1780 MASON 300

THE

COLUMBIAN ORATOR, &C.

INTRODUCTION.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR SPEAKING ; EX

TRACTED FROM VARIOUS AUTHORS.

OF PRONUNCIATION IN GENERAL

THE

THE best judges among the ancients have repre

sented Pronunciation, which they likewise called Action, as the principal part of an orator's province ; from whence he is chiefly to expect success in the art of persuasion. When Cicero, in the person of Crassus, bas largely and elegantly discoursed upon all the other parts of oratory, coming at last to speak of this, he says, i All the former have their effect as they are pronounced. It is the action alone which governs in speaking ; without which the best orator is of no value ; and is often defeated by one, in other respects, much his inferior." And he lets us know, that Demosthenes was of the same opinion ; who, when he was asked what was the principal thing in oratory, replied, Action ; and being asked again a second and a third time, what was next considerable, he still made the same answer,

And,

up hill ;

And, indeed, if he had not judged this highly necesa sary for an orator, he would scarcely have taken so much pains in correcting those natural defects, under which he laboured at first, in order to acquire it. For he had both a weak voice, and likewise an impediment in his speech, so that he could not pronounce distinctly some particular letters. The former of which defects he conquered, partly by speaking as loud as he could upon the shore, when the sea roared and was boisterous ; and partly by pronouncing long periods as he walked

both of which methods contributed to strengthen his voice. And he found means to render his pronunciation more clear and articulate, by the help of some little stones put under his tongue. Nor was he less careful in endeavouring to gain the habit of a becoming and decent gesture ; for which purpose he used to pronounce his discourses alone before a large glass. And because he had an ill custom of drawing up his shoulders when he spoke, to amend that, he used to place them under a sword, which hung over him with the point downward.

Such pains did this prince of the Grecian orators take to remove those difficulties, which would have been sufficient to discourage an inferiour, and less aspiring genius. And to how great a perfection he arrived in his action, under all these disadvantages, by his indefatigable diligence and application, is evident from the confession of his great adversary and rival in oratory, Eschines ; who, when he could not bear the disgrace of being worsted by Demosthenes in the cause of Ctesiphon, Tetired to Rhodes. And being desired by the inhabitants, · he recited to them his own oration upon that occasion ; the next day they requested of him to let them hear that of Demosthenes; which, having pronounced in a most graceful manner, to the admiration of all who were present, “How much more (says he) would you have wondered, if you had heard him speak it himself !”

We might add to these authorities the judgment of Quintilian ; who says, that “ It is not of so much mo

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