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PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION,

In preparing, about a year since, an edition of the Poems of Thomas Hood, we thought that a single volume would include all of his writings in verse that fell within the plan of our series. That volume embraced all the poems contained in the Moxon collections of the author's sentimental and humorous verse, with several additions from other sources.

It was the most complete collection that had been made at the time of its appearance.

We soon ascertained, however, that it would not entirely satisfy the demand for Hood's productions. We received more than one letter suggesting that some favorite of the writer's was omitted, which had originally appeared, perhaps, in a magazine or annual, and had not been inserted in any collection of the author's Poems. This deficiency, to its full extent, we have hardly been able to supply even by a second volume.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1862, by

EPES SARGENT, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massacbusetts.

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PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION,

other sources.

In preparing, about a year since, an edition of the Poems of Thomas Hood, we thought that a single volume would include all of his writings in verse that fell within the plan of our series. That volume embraced all the poems contained in the Moxon collections of the author's sentimental and humorous verse, with several additions from

It was the most complete collection that had been made at the time of its appearance.

We soon ascertained, however, that it would not entirely satisfy the demand for Hood's productions. We received more than one letter suggesting that some favorite of the writer's was omitted, which had originally appeared, perhaps, in a magazine or annual, and had not been inserted in any collection of the author's Poems. This deficiency, to its full extent, we have hardly been able to supply even by a second volume.

The materials of the present volume have been chiefly drawn from the collections of his humorous pieces, published by the author under the title of Hood's Own, Whimsicalilies, and Whims and Oddities. To these we have added a few poems from the London Mugazine and the New Monthly Magazine, that appeared in those periodicals during Hood's editorial relations with them, and are unquestionably from his pen. In one or two instances verses rather of a sentimental than an humorous character have found their way among the Miscellaneous Poems, but we trust they will not be considered as unwelcome intruders.

We have reserved the first poems of Hood for the last place in the book; assigning them to a quasi-appendix, for reasons that will obviously occur to the reader. It is many years since the Odes and Adresses to Great People have been reprinted, and some of the allusions in them are to subjects of local and temporary notoriety, which require the few annotations that we have annexed. To us these very clever jeux d'esprit seem to merit the high commendation that they received from COLERIDGE on their first appearance.

His letter to LAMB on their authorship we have inserted among the Notes at the end of the volume.

This work was the joint production of Hood and the literary friend and connection to whom he afterward dedicated the poem of Lycus. In LORD BYRON'S Journal, under date of February 20, 1814, an entry is made of his having acknowledged the receipt of young REYNOLDS'S poem, entitled Safie. - The lad is clever,” his lordship writes, “but much of his thoughts are borrowedwhence the reviewers may find out. I hate discouraging a young one; and I think—though wild and more oriental than he would be, had he seen the scenes where he has placed his tale—that he has much talent, and, certainly, fire enough.” This "clever lad” we next hear of among the crack contributors of the London Magazins-for we presume that the author of Sa fie is the same John HamILTON REYNOLDS described by TALFOURD as one of that remarkable corps, and as “lighting up the wildest eccentricities and most striking features of many-colored life with vivid fancy."

In the Reminiscences of Hood there is a lively sketch of one of the dinners that occasionally brought together the contributors to the Magazine, which serves him to introduce some of the principal characters of the literary " London in the Olden Time." After describing Elia,

and Barry Cornwall, and the Opium Eater, and sundry others of hardly less note, Hood writes—“ That smart, active person opposite, with a game-cock-looking head, and the hair combed smooth, fighter fashion, over his foreheadwith one finger hooked round a glass of Champagne-not that he requires it to inspirit him, for his wit bubbles up of itself—is our Edward Herbert, the author of that true piece of biography, the Life of Peter Corcoran. He is good with both hands, like that Nonpareil Randall, at a comic verse or a serious stanza-smart at a repartee

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