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topics of difference between him- disturbing element in the s
self and Mr. Laing, expressing counts, professing great e
his regret that there should be nishment at the arguments :
any personal ingredient in these had employed to supporte
differences, and his anxiety to justify these views; and be
avoid any observations that might iterated his own opinions :
be offensive to him. He com. the subject. Having thus eller
plained of the extreme inaccuracy the ground, he proceeded tos
of the accounts transmitted from what the finances of India ra
India, which, he said, had been a had been in the last three ya
source of the greatest annoyance

Years. Revenue.
to him, and which deprived the
public of the means of knowing 1860-61 42,903,0001

. 46,9%.**

1861-62 42,911,000l. 43,506,
what they had a right to know

1862-63 42,971,0001. 43,255,
the real state of the Indian
finances. He then proceeded to The result showed, be observa

show, in details of figures, the a deficit of revenue in each fra alleged errors in the accounts which he expected would dise furnished from India for the years pear at the end of the preses 1860-61, 1861–62, and the esti. year, as we were approaching. b mate for 1862-63, accompanied thought, a sound system of I by explanations of the sources dian finance. He stated u of the errors. The result, in progress made in public won 1862-63, was that Mr. Laing in India; and, with respect : had over-estimated his surplus cotton, he had been informed, I by about 1,000,0001., and, hav. said, by Sir George Clerk this ing remitted taxes to the amount the growth of that plant had ex of 725,0001., he had really a desiderably increased. He w ficit of revenue in that year. Mr. decidedly of opinion that the Laing, he observed, had assumed Government ought not to inte that the cash bolances in the fere in this matter ; that an ade Indian treasuries having in- quate demand would produce so creased, he must have a con- adequate supply; but all assis siderable surplus revenue. Sir ance needed by cotton merchans Charles argued that this was an in conducting their own trans untevable assumption, and that tions, he added, should be affordel Mr. Laing's theory was erroneous. He adverted to the changes the He then discussed the question had been made in the Indias a3 to the loss by exchange of the Councils and the Governmenta rupee into sterling money in the departments, and in the law to railway accounts, being 2. in bunals in India; to the state di the rupee, which loss had been the Civil Serce; and to the omitted in the accounts sent from reductions in the army. Hedwel

the land between the chiefs and of the Government with the prithe peasantry In addition to vate money of adventurers. Bethese measures, the merit of sides railways, the Government which was due to Lord Can. patronized other companies, which ning, the Government had were floated by means of the misdetermined, as a proper com

chievous system of guarantees, plement, to carry out as soon and hence the derangement of as practicable throughout Bri. the Indian finances, over which tish India a permanent settle. the House did not exercise a ment of land tenures. Our In- proper control. dian empire, he remarked, had Mr. Gregson observed that, if suffered a shock which had left there had been no Government its lesson. Our power had been guarantee, there would, in his sustained by military strength; opinion, have been no railways in but a source of still greater India. He made a few remarks strength would be found in the upon the points in dispute beattachment of the people of India. tween Siroc. Wood and Mr. In conclusion, Sir Charles paid a Laing. warm tribute to the character and Mr. Crawford accused Mr. services of Lord Canning. Smollett of having spoken of

Mr. H. Seymour thought that Indian railway companies withMr. Laing's mistakes were ex- out a correct knowledge of the cusable, the Government of India facts. Upon the financial queshaving concurred in his views, tions, particularly with reference and Sir C. Wood not having to the loss by exchange of the given him timely notice of the rupee, he explained the effect of errors. As to some of the ques- the arrangement between the tions, Mr. Laing, he thought, Government and the railway whether right or wrong, was not companies, and his own view of open to animadversion. He urged the subject, which, to a certain the necessity of a larger expen- extent, coincided with that of Sir diture upon roads in India, and C. Wood. As to the cotton ques. that more discretion should be tion, he argued that it would be a left to the local Government. violation of the first principles of He complained of the present political economy for the GovernHome Administration and of the ment to interfere. It was a matgreat expense of the department. ter of satisfaction to observe, he

Mr. Smollett admitted that said, the great extension of the there had been a great reduction products of India. He expressed of expenditure in India and a his gratification at the statement material advance in the prosperity of Sir C. Wood. of the country: but he complained After some further observations that the management of the In- upon the points in dispute bedian finances, a clear and simple tween Sir* c. Wood and Mr. matter, was very faulty: that the Laing, and a reply from the for. deficiencies were caused by ex- mer, the Resolutions were agreed travagance; that there was a to. mystification about railway trans A concession of great value in actions, and he protested against the eyes of the friends of freedom, the mixing up of the public money was made this year by the Go.

India, insisting upon the fallacy upon the good effects which had of the reasons assigned by the resulted from the policy now par Indian Government for the omis. sued towards the native Princes zion. He disputed Mr. Laing's of the country, and from the views upon the subject of the measures taken to create an repayment of advanc: s, another intermediate class connected with

vernment of the United States. Lord Brougham, while con-
On the 20th of May, Earl Russell gratulating Government upon
laid on the table of the House of the convention concluded with
Lords a copy of the treaty just the United States, asked if some
concluded between the States and arrangement could not be made
this country for the suppression by which the right of search, now
of the Slave Trade. He said conceded within thirty leagues of
the present Government of the the coasts of Africa and Cuba,
United States had shown great might be further extended to
anxiety for the extinction of the within thirty leagues of the island
slave trade, and the present treaty, of Port Rico ?
which gave extensive rights of Earl Granville replied that, as
search to the cruisers of both the United States Government
nations, would, he hoped, to. were thoroughly in earnest on the
gether with other measures subject, he had every reason to
adopted by that Government, go believe they would listen favour-
far towards the attainment of ably to any suggestion such as
that object.

that made by Lord Brougham.

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CHAPTER VII.

vernment of the United States. On the 20th of May, Earl Russell gratulating Government to

Lord Brougham, while e laid on the table of the House of the convention concluded Lords a copy of the treaty just the United States, asked if so concluded between the States and arrangement could not be me this country for the suppression by which the right of search

. of the Slave Trade. He said conceded within thirty leagues the present Government of the the coasts of Africa and Cats United States had shown great might be further extended anxiety for the extinction of the within thirty leagues of the isk slave trade, and the present treaty, of Port Rico? which gave extensive rights of Earl Granville replied that: search to the cruisers of both the United States Guvertir nations, would, he hoped, to- were thoroughly in earnest on t gether with other measures subject, he had every reason! adopted by that Government, go believe they would listen favor far towards the attainment of ably to any suggestion such : that object.

that made by Lord Broughan.

UPON

MiscellaneOUS MEASURES. -- SETTLEMENT THE MARRIAGE

OF H.R.H. THE PRINCESS ALICE—The provision recommended by the Government is unanimously and cordially voted by the House of Commons-A scheme for erecting nero Law Courts in the neighbourhood of Lincoln's Inn is proposed by the Government -- Mr. Selwyn and Mr. Walpole oppose the proposition-The Chancellor of the Exchequer supports it-It is rejected on a division by 83 to 81-Debate in the House of Commons upon the System of Competitive Examinations for the Civil Service - Mr. P. Hennessy, Mr. Cochrane, Mr. Bentinck, and other Members object to the system-Lord Stanley and Sir George Lewis defend itThe House sets aside the Motion by negativing the previous question. Law or HIGHWAYS--Sir George Grey re-introduces the Bill for the Amendment of Highway Law, which had been in former years proposed and withdrawn-The Second Reading is carried, after some debate, by a majority of 111- The Bill, with some modifications, passes through both Houses. TRANSFER OF LAND AND SECURITY OF TITLE TO PURCHASERS--Bills for effecting these objects are brought in by the Lord Chancellor, and other Bills, with similar objects, by Lord Cranworth, Lord St. Leonard's, and Lord Chelmsford-Statement of the Lord Chancellor, on introducing his measures--Observations of several of the Law LordsThe several Bills are referred to a Select Committee-Those of the Lord Chancellor pass through the House of Lords, and are introduced in the House of Commons by Sir Roundell Palmer, Solicitor-General - His able Speech on moving the Second Reading of the Land Transfer Bill-Speeches of Sir H. Cuirns, Sir F. Kelly, Mr. Malins, and the Attorney-General--The Government Bills pass a Second Reading -Sir II. Cairns mores to refer them to a Select Committee, which is opposed by the Law Officers of the Crown The Bills go through a Committee of the whole House and become loro. AMENDMENT OF THE LAW OF LUNACY-- The Lord Chancellor brings in a Bill, which is carried through Parliament, to simplify and abridge the inquiries under Commissions of Lunacy. GAME LAWS--A Bill introduced by Lord Berners for the repression of Night Poaching, meets with much opposition in both llou80s--It is passed in the Lords, but strenuously resisted by the Government and by Liberal Members in the House of Commons--Sir Balduin Leighton takes charge of the Bill, which is strongly supported by many of the Conservative partyAfter much controversy and many divisions in favour of the Bill, it is passed into a law. EMBANKMENT OF THE THAMES - A Measure to

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carry out this objecl is brought in by Mr. W. Coreper on behalf of the Government - It is referred to a Select Committee, which recommends an important alteration in the Scheme-Imputations made against the Committee of having given too much weight to prirale interestsTheir Report occasions much controrersy-Mr. Doulton mores the re-commital of the Bill, with a view to the restoration of the original pland warm discussion ensues, in which Mr. K. Seymer, Lord H. Vane, Sir J. Shelley, Mr. Horsman, Mr. Couper, and Lord Palmerston take part- Vİr. Doulton's amendment, being considered premature, is withdrawn-Mr. Locke proposes a motion with the same object at a later stage, which is carried by 149 to 109, and the scheme of the Bill as introduced by the Gorernment is adopted The Bill goes up to the House of Lords, where the Duke of Buccleugh makes a statement in vindication of the course pursued by him-Earl Granville, the Earl of Derby, and other Peers, acquit the noble Duke of all imputations, and the Bill is passed-End of the Session-Mr. Cobden gires notice that he shall offer observations upon the policy of Lord Palmer. ston's Administration--His Speech-He arraigns the aggressive spirit of the Government as shown on many occasions-He compares the Premier's conduct with that of the Opposition Leader, unfarourably to the former -Speech of Lord Palmerston in rindication of the Measures of his Gorernment, and of their conduct towards Foreign States-Speech of Mr. Disraeli, who seconds many of Mr. Cobien's charges - Obserrations of Mr. Lindsay, Sir M. Peto, Lord Clarence Pagel, and other Jlembers--Prorogation of Parliament on the 7th of August, by CommissionThe Royal Speech, as delirered by the Lord ChancellorResults of the Session-State of Parties and additions to the Statute Book.

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PROPOSITION for a settle- sides of the House. Another

ment upon Her Royal High- proposal of a different nature, in. ness the Princess Alice, prepara volving a considerable charge tory to her auspicious narringe upon the public purse, met with with Prince Louis of Hesse, was a less favourable reception. The made hy the Government, and object of the grant asked for was unanimously and cordially adopt- the construction of a new builded by the House of Commons. ing, to afford accommodation for Lord Palmerston proposed that a the sittings of the Courts of Law dowry of 30,0001. and an annuity and Equity, in lieu of the existof 6,0001. should be granted, which ing Courts of Justice at Westhe considered would be a suitable minster Hall and Lincoln's Inn. provision for the dignity of the Mr. Cowper, as Chief CommisPrincess, and not too large a sioner of Public Works, moved demand upon the liberality of the second reading of a Bill for Parliament

giving effect to this object, exThe Resolution for charging plaining at the same time the the-e sums on the Consolidated grounds of his motion. He set Fund was adapted nem. con , and forth the advantages that would accompanied with loyal and com.

risult from better accommodation plimentary expressions from both being provided for the Courts,

carry out this object is brought in by Mr. W. Corper on behalf of Government--It is referred to a Select Committee, which recommend an important alteration in the Scheme-Imputations made Committee of having given too much weight to prirate interests–Tver

against Report occasions much controversy --Mr. Doulton moves the recents mittal of the Bill, with a view to the restoration of the original pla A warm discussion ensues, in which Mr. K. Seymer, Lord H. Tane Sir J. Shelley, Mr. Horsman, Mr. Couper, and Lord Palmeria take part-Mr. Doulton's amendment, being considered premature

, i withdrawn-Mr. Locke proposes a motion with the same object '! later stage, which is carried by 149 to 109, and the scheme of the B: as introduced by the Government is adopted - The Bill goes up to tu House of Lords, where the Duke of Buccleugh makes a statement : vindication of the course pursued by him-Earl Granville, the Eur of Derby, and other Peers, acquit the noble Duke of all imputatica and the Bill is passed-End of the Session-Mr. Cobden gira notice that he shall offer observations upon the policy of Lord Palmeston's Administration-His Speech-He arraigns the aggressive spirt of the Government as shown on many occasionsHe compares Premier's conduct with that of the Opposition Leader, unfarourally the former --Speech of Lord Palmerston in vindication of the Measure of his Gorernment, and of their conduct towards Foreign StatesSpeech of Mr. Disraeli, reho seconds many of Mr. Coblen's charges --Obsercations of Mr. Lindsay, Sir M. Peto, Lord Clarence Pagel, and other /embers— Prorogation of Parliament on the 7th of August

, by Com-zissionThe Royal Speech, as delivered by the Lord ChancellorResults of the Session---State of Parties and additions to the Statate Fook.

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and from their being brought men, as our finances were not in into juxta-position, which would a flourishing state, and four out be of pecuniary value to suitors. of the sis Courts of Chancery Looking at the subject in all its were admirably situated, they aspects, the measure was, he said, should hesitate before they proa most important legal reform. ceeded to pull down a rast He proposed that this Bill should number of houses, and build be referred to a Select Com- new courts, at an expense which mittee, which would ascertain the he was convinced would far erreal amount of the charge the ceed the estimate. Admiting whole scheme would impose upon the object to be a good one, this the country, and he added some was not the time. In the present details on the subject of the state of our finances he would charge to those he had given on not incur the responsibility of the introduction of the Bill. The approving what he considered an maximum charge upon the Con- extravagant proposition. solidated Fund would be 45,0001. On a division, the Bill was lost a-year, subject to reduction and by a majority of 2, there being ultimate extinction, as the com- 81 for, and <3 against, the second pensation allowances, amounting reading. to 59,0001. a-year, gradually fell Among the questions of gene.

He was aware that the ral interest which came under Society of Lincoln's-inn desired Parliamentary discussion to keep the Equity Courts within Session, was that of the system the precincts of their Inn; but of competitive examinations for this desire did not mect with the Civil Service, upon the merits favour from the whole profession, of which public opinion had been and could not be set against the variously expressed. great advantages of bringing all Mr. Pope Hennessy moved a the courts and offices under one Resolution in the House of Comroof in a convenient site. mons in the following terms:

Mr. Selwyn objected that the “ That the best mode of procurproposed scheme would entail a ing competent persons to fill the very heavy expense upon the junior clerkships in the Civil country, which, considering the Service, would be through a present state of our national system of Competitive Examinafinances, he strongly objected to. tion open to all subjects of the He justified the claim of the So. Queen, who fulfil certain definite ciety of Lincoln's-inn to retain conditions as to age, health, and these courts within their limits, character; and that, with a view and moved that the Bill be of establishing such a system of read a second time that day six open competition, it is desirable months.

that the experiment first tried at Sir Henry Willoughby, Mr. the India house in 1859, be reBouverie, and Jr. Malins, sup- peated from time to time in the ported the amendment.

other departments of the Civil The Chancellor of the Exche. Service.” quer, the Attorney and Solicitor The motion was seconded by General, advocuted the Bill. Mr. Vansittart, who read to the

Mr. Walpole said, as prudent House the opinions of various

PROPOSITION for a settle- sides of the House. Another
ment upon
Her Royal High- proposal of a different nature

, in-
s the Princess Alice, prepara. volving a considerable chante

to her auspicious marriage upon the public purse, met wa
2 Prince Louis of Hesse, was a less favourable reception. The
le by the Government, and object of the grant asked for was
nimously and cordially adopt- the construction of a new build-
y the House of Commons. ing, to afford accommodation für
Palmerston proposed that a the sittings of the Courts of Lar
y of 30,0001

. and an annuity and Equity, in lieu of the exist
001. should be granted, which ing Courts of Justice at West
msidered would be a suitable minster Hall and Lincoln's Inn
sion for the dignity of the Mr. Cowper, as Chief Conmis
ess, and not too large & sioner of Public Works, mored
d upon the liberality of the second reading of a Bill för

giving effect to this object

, erResolution for charging plaining at the same time the cums on the Consolidated grounds of his motion. He set was adopted nem. con, and forth the advantages that would anied with loyal and com- result from better accommodation cary expressions from both being provided for the Courts,

ment.

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