Cecil, a Peer: A Sequel to Cecil, Or, The Adventures of a Coxcomb, Volum 3

Forside

Inni boken

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Utvalgte sider

Innhold

Del 9
134
Del 10
159
Del 11
160
Del 20
262
Del 21
284

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 1 - Good my lord, You have begot me, bred me, lov'd me : I .Return those duties back as are right fit, Obey you, love you, and most honour you. Why have my sisters husbands if they say They love you all? Haply, when I shall wed, That lord whose hand must take my plight shall carry Half my love with him, half my care and duty : Sure I shall never marry like my sisters, To love my father all.
Side 284 - Locks of pure brown, display'd th' encroaching white ; " The blood once fervid now to cool began, " And Time's strong pressure to subdue the man : * I rode or walk'd as I was wont before, " But now the bounding spirit was no more ; " A moderate pace would now my body heat, " A walk of moderate length distress my feet. " I show'd my stranger-guest those hills sublime, " But said, ' The view is poor, we need not climb.
Side 284 - And bless'd the shower that gave me not to choose. In fact, I felt a languor stealing on ; The active arm, the agile hand were gone ; Small daily actions into habits grew, And new dislike to forms and...
Side 56 - God ordain'ed not so. Home flies the Prince and to his trembling Wife Relates the new-past hazard of his life, Which she with decent passion hears him tell ; For not her own fair Eyes she lov'ed so well.
Side 284 - I learn'd to play at chess ; I took my dog and gun, but saw the brute Was disappointed that I did not shoot ; My morning walks I now could bear to lose, And bless'd the shower that gave me not to choose.
Side 161 - Le caprice a taillé son petit nez charmant ; Sa bouche a des rougeurs de pêche et de framboise ; Ses mouvements sont pleins d'une grâce chinoise, Et près d'elle on respire, autour de sa beauté, . Quelque chose de doux comme l'odeur du thé.
Side 284 - Locks of pure brown, displayed the encroaching white ; The blood, once fervid, now to cool began, And Time's strong pressure to subdue the man. I rode or walked as I was wont before, But now the bounding spirit was no more ; A moderate pace would now my body heat ; A walk of moderate length distress my feet. I showed my stranger guest those hills sublime, But said, " The view is poor ; we need not climb...
Side 161 - Pour veiner de son front la pâleur délicate, Le Japon a donné son plus limpide azur ; La blanche porcelaine est d'un blanc bien moins pur Que son col transparent et ses tempes d'agate. Dans sa prunelle humide un doux rayon éclate ; Le chant du rossignol près de sa voix est dur, Et, quand elle se lève à notre ciel obscur, On dirait de la lune en sa robe d'ouate. Ses yeux d'argent bruni roulent moelleusement ; Le caprice a taillé...
Side 165 - Locksley had a dozen such volumes; and it was probably in the hope of getting them inscribed therein, in the most delicately illegible of hands upon the most satin of papers, that I strung together the following Delia Cruscan STANZAS. I dreamt one day a waking dream, Brighter than Slumber's are, Of wandering where the planets gleam, Like an unsphered star; Round a Chimera's yielding neck With grasping hands I clung; No need of spur, — no fear of check, — Those fields of air among.
Side 105 - But I am apt to grow too metaphysical : " The time is out of joint," and so am I : I quite forget this poem's merely quizzical, And deviate into matters rather dry. I ne'er decide what I shall say, and this I call Much too poetical : men should know why They write, and for what end ; but, note or text, I never know the word which will come next.

Bibliografisk informasjon