History of the Origin, Formation, and Adoption of the Constitution of the United States: With Notices of Its Principal Framers, Volum 1

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Harper and Bros., 1854 - 653 sider
 

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Washington does not concur in their Expediency 60 Powers of the National Government 62 Difficulties attending their Exercise 63 Popular Feeling a...
68
Washington borrows Money of the Province of Massachusetts Bay 80 Defects of the Revolutionary Government
80
CHAPTER IV
89
Eminent Men retire from Congress 104 Delegations of the States renewed
105
Embarrassments in the Formation of the Army 110 Persistence of the States in giving Extra Bounties 110 Bounty offered by Massachusetts
111
Practice of Representation familiar
117
A New Congress 236
121
First Stage in the Constitutional History of the Country
123
The present Congress compared with that of 1776
127
Claims of the Larger States to Vacant Lands 131 Objection of the Smaller States 131 Assent of Maryland to the Confederation withheld
133
Progress of the People of the United States towards a National Character 139 Security against a Dissolution of the Confederacy
140
Powers of Congress with regard to the External Relations of the Country 144 Powers of Congress with regard to Internal Affairs 115
146
1783
155
The Newburgh Addresses 159 Congress votes an Establishment of HalfPay for the Officers 160 Impracticable Adherence to the Principles of Civil Li...
162
Causes which delayed the Adoption of the Confederation
165
Anonymous Address circulated among the Officers at Newburgh
168
Financial Difficulties of the Confederation Revolutionary
172
Claims of the various Classes of the Public Creditors 178 Character of the United States involved 179 The Confederation a Government for Purposes ...
181
Opinions and Efforts of Washington and of Hamilton
200
Hamiltons Entry into Congress 206 Nature of a Federal Constitution not understood
206
Advises General Taxes to be collected under Continental Authority
212
Hamilton advises Federal Provision for Defence 219 Congress driven from Philadelphia 220 Hamilton examines the Confederation
221
Falling off in the Attendance of Members of Congress Results of the Confederation 22i
228
The Frahers of the Constitution Washington President
233
State of the Union from 1783 to 1787 233 Dangers and Evils which existed during the Four Years after the War
234
Washingtons Resignation
235
Number of Delegates from each State 238 Low State of the Representation 23
241
Argument used in Support of her Refusal
247
The United States insist on the Right to navigate the Mississippi
314
Decay and Failure of the Confederation Progress of Opinion
328
Progress of Opinion upon the Subject of a General Government 332 333 Important Centres of Opinion 334 Action of Massachusetts
334
Action of Virginia 340 Proposed Enlargement of the Powers of Congress over Trade
340
Exertions of Hamilton
345
Legal Difficulties in the Way of a Convention 356 Views entertained in Congress 357 Critical State of the Country 357 358 It impels Congress to Act...
358
Washingtons Opinions 370 371 Other Difficulties attending the Revision of the Federal System 371 Sectional Jealousy and its Causes 371 372 New I...
373
Embarrassments attending the Assembling of the Convention
380
Consequences of a Want of Power in the First Government 383 Its Incapacity 384 Sufferings of the People 384 Civil Liberty the Result of Trial and ...
386
Slight Value of the Examples of other Countries 391 Necessity for a National Head 392 The New Government established without Violence
393
Receives Official Notice of his Appointment to the Convention 399 Declines the Appointment 399 The Insurrection in Massachusetts changes his Det...
399
He leaves Mount Vernon for Philadelphia
401
Immediate Effect of his Death upon the Country
407
Madison
420
Appointed one of the Commissioners to Annapolis
427
Drafts the Act of Virginia appointing Delegates to the Federal Con
428
c
433
His long Career of Public Service 433434 His distinguished Residences abroad 434
434
CHAPTER XI
440
CHAPTER XII
448
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
454
Wilson
462
An Aidedecamp to Washington 480 Services in Congress 480 Elected Governor of Virginia 481 Procures the Attendance of Washington 481 His Op...
481
Responsible Position of the American People 487488
487
Circular Letter of Congress recommending the Articles of Con
498
Act to authorize the Delegates of the Delaware State to ratify
504
Members of the Convention which formed the Constitution
516

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Side 510 - The better to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different States in this Union, the free inhabitants of each of these States, paupers, vagabonds, and fugitives from justice excepted, shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of free citizens in the several States; and the people of each State shall have free ingress and regress to and from any other State, and shall enjoy therein all the privileges of trade and commerce subject to the same duties,...
Side 207 - STATES, and to consist of one delegate from each state; and to appoint such other committees and civil officers as may be necessary for managing the general affairs of the United States under their...
Side 513 - All controversies concerning the private right of soil, claimed under different grants of two or more States, whose jurisdictions as they may respect such lands and the States which passed such grants are adjusted, the said grants or either of them being at the same time claimed to have originated antecedent to such settlement of jurisdiction, shall, on the petition of either party to the Congress of the United States...
Side 362 - That, in the opinion of Congress, it is expedient that, on the second Monday in May next, a convention of delegates who shall have been appointed by the several states, be held at Philadelphia, for the sole and express purpose of revising the articles of confederation, and reporting to Congress, and the several legislatures, such...
Side 305 - And, in the just preservation of rights and property, it is understood and declared that no law ought ever to be made or have force in the said Territory that shall, in any manner whatever, interfere with or affect private contracts, or engagements, bona fide, and without fraud previously formed.
Side 308 - And whenever any of the said States shall have sixty thousand free inhabitants therein such State shall be admitted by its delegates into the Congress of the United States on an equal footing with the original states in all respects whatever, and shall be at liberty to form a permanent constitution and State government.
Side 512 - States shall be divided or appropriated ; of granting letters of marque and reprisal in times of peace, appointing courts for the trial of piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and establishing courts for receiving and determining finally appeals in all cases of captures, provided that no member of Congress shall be appointed a judge of any of the said courts.
Side 512 - When land forces are raised by any state for the common defence, all officers of or under the rank of colonel shall be appointed by the legislature of each state respectively by whom such forces shall be raised, or in such manner as such state shall direct, and all vacancies shall be filled up by the state which first made the appointment. ARTICLE VIII. All charges of war and all other expenses that shall be incurred for the common defence or general welfare, and allowed by the United States in congress...
Side 236 - I consider it as an indispensable duty to close this last solemn act of my official life, by commending the interests of our dearest country, to the protection of Almighty God, and those who have the superintendence of them to his holy keeping.
Side 511 - No State shall engage in any war without the consent of the United States in Congress assembled, unless such State be actually invaded by enemies, or shall have received certain advice of a resolution being formed by some nation of Indians to invade such State, and the danger is so imminent as not to admit of a delay, till the United States in Congress assembled can be consulted...

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