A practical treatise on banking

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Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1856
 

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Side 299 - This great increase of the quantity of work which, in consequence of the division of labour, the same number of people are capable of performing, is owing to three different circumstances; first, to the increase of dexterity in every particular workman; secondly, to the saving of the time which is commonly lost in passing from one species of work to another ; and lastly, to the invention of a great number of machines which facilitate and abridge labour, and enable one man to do the work of many.
Side 22 - And let them judge the people at all seasons: and it shall be, that every great matter they shall bring unto thee but every small matter they shall judge: so shall it be easier for thyself, and they shall bear the burden with thee.
Side 196 - Truly the light is sweet, and a pleasant thing it is for the eyes to behold the sun...
Side 22 - Moses' father in law saw all that he did to the people, he said, What is this thing that thou doest to the people? why sittest thou thyself alone, and all the people stand by thee from morning unto even?
Side 20 - He that answereth a matter before he heareth it, it is folly and shame unto him.
Side 201 - For the correspondencies of wisdom and goodness are manifold ; and that they will accompany each other is to be inferred, not only because men's wisdom makes them good, but also because their goodness makes them wise.
Side 23 - Is not Aaron the Levite thy brother? I know that he can speak well. And also, behold, he cometh forth to meet thee: and when he seeth thee, he will be glad in his heart.
Side 299 - When the human hand, or the human head, has been for some time occupied in any kind of work, it cannot instantly change its employment with full effect. The muscles of the limbs employed have acquired a flexibility during their exertion, and those not in action a stiffness during rest, which renders every change slow and unequal in the commencement. Long habit also produces in the muscles exercised a capacity for enduring fatigue to a much greater degree than they could support under other circumstances.

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