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BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY

OF

ENGLAND,

From Egbert the Great to the Revolution:

CONSISTING OF

CHARACTERS DISPOSED IN DIFFERENT CLASSES,

AND ADAPTED TO

A METHODICAL CATALOGUE OF ENGRAVED BRITISH HEADS :

INTENDED AS

AN ESSAY TOWARDS REDUCING OUR BIOGRAPHY TO SYSTEM, AND

A HELP TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF PORTRAITS :

INTERSPERSED WITH

A VARIETY OF ANECDOTES,

AND

MEMOIRS OF A GREAT NUMBER OF PERSONS,

NOT TO BE FOUND IN ANY OTHER BIOGRAPHICAL WORK.

WITH A PREFACE,

SHEWING THE UTILITY OF A COLLECTION OF ENGRAVED PORTRAITS TO SUPPLY THE

DEFECT, AND ANSWER THE VARIOUS PURPOSES, OF MEDALS.

BY THE REV. J. GRANGER,

VICAR OF SHIPLAKE, IN OXFORDSHIRE.

Animum picturâ pascit inani.–VIRG.
Celebrare domestica facta.-HOR.

FIFTH EDITION,
WITH UPWARDS OF FOUR HUNDRED ADDITIONAL LIVES.

IN SIX VOLUMES:

VOL. V.

LONDON:
PRINTED FOR WILLIAM BAYNES AND SON,

PATERNOSTEŘ ROW:
AND SOLD BY W. CLARKE, NEW BOND STREET ; J. MAJOR, FLEET STREET ; J. AND J. ARCH,

CORNHILL: J. PARKER, OXFORD: DEIGHTON AND SONS, CAMBRIDGE;
H. S. BAYNES AND CO. EDINBURGH; AND R. M. TIMS, DUBLIN.

1824.

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BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY

OF

ENGLAND.

REIGN OF CHARLES II. CONTINUED.

CLASS IV.

THE CLERGY.

ARCHBISHOPS AND BISHOPS. GILBERTUS SHELDON, archiepiscopus Cantuariensis ; half length; h. sh. mezz.

The print exactly corresponds with the original painting of him in the theatre at Oxford. There is another original at Amesbury, similar to the former.

GILBERTUS SHELDON ; a head copied, from this print, by Vertue ; large 4to.

GILBERTUS SHELDON, &c. D. Loggan ad vivum del. et sc. This was done when he was bishop of London.

ARCHBISHOP SHELDON; an engraving, 8vo. copied from the larger mezzotinto.

ARCHBISHOP SHELDON; 8vo. mezz.
GILBERT SHELDON, &c. Clamp.

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GILBERT SHELDON, &c. Gardiner; 4to. 1797. There is a good print of his monument in Croydon church, in Lyson's “ Environs of London.”

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Translated from London, Aug. 1663.

GILBERT SHELDON. T. Nugent sc. In Harding's
Biographical Mirrour,” 1793.

Archbishop Sheldon was some time warden of All-Souls College, in Oxford, and clerk of the closet to Charles I. who had a great esteem for him. He was, upon the restoration of Charles II. who knew his worth, and during his exile had experienced his munificence, made dean of the chapel royal. He was afterward successively promoted to the sees of London and Canterbury, in both which he succeeded Dr. Juxon. His benevolent heart, public spirit, prudent conduct, and exemplary piety, merited the highest and most conspicuous station in the church. He expended, in public and private benefactions, and acts of charity, no less than 66,0001. as appeared from his accounts. Much of this money was appropriated to the relief of the necessitous in the time of the plague, and to the redemption of Christian slaves. The building only of the theatre in Oxford cost him 16,0001. This structure alone is sufficient to perpetuate the memory of the founder and the architect. Ob. 9 Nov. 1677.

RICHARDUS STERNE, archiepiscopus Eboracensis. F. Place f. large h. sh. mezz.

RICHARD STERNE. Harding sc. 1799. Richard Sterne, who was educated at Cambridge, was, in the reign of Charles I. master of Jesus College in that university, and chaplain to Archbishop Laud. Upon the commencement of the civil war, when the king's necessities were very urgent, he, and several others of the heads of houses, were very instrumental in sending the Cambridge plate to his majesty to be coined for his use. This gave great offence to Cromwell, who seized Dr. Sterne, Dr. Beale, master of St. John's College, and Dr. Martin, master of Queen's, and carried them to London ; where they were imprisoned for a year, and afterward sent on board a ship at Wapping, put under hatches, and treated with great inhumanity.* A little before the execution of his good friend and patron, the archbishop, he was permitted to attend him, and performed the last offices for him on the scaffold. He lived in great obscurity till the restoration, when he returned to his mastership of Jesus College, which he held till he was made bishop of Carlisle. He was afterward translated to York. He was a man of worth, and of good abilities as an author. He compiled a system of logic; and wrote a comment upon the 103d Psalm. He gave 18501. towards the rebuilding of St. Paul's church. Ob. 18 June, 1683, Æt. 87.

Translated from Car

20, 1664.

* Dr. Eachard, in the Dedication of his second Dialogue against Hobbes, says, that he was able to live down many “ Leviathans.”

* In the “Strafforde Papers,". vol. i. p. 208, is this passage, in a letter of G. Gerard to the lord-deputy Wentworth : The long-disputed business for the headship of St. John's College, in Cambridge, is now at an end, &c. and one Sterne, a solid scholar, who first summed up the three thousand and six hundred faults that were in our printed Bibles of London, is by his Majesty's direction to the Bishop of Ely, who elects there, made master of Jesus College."

HUMPHREDUS HENCHMAN, episcopus Londinensis. Lely p. half length; h. sh. mezz.

HUMPHREY HENCHMAN; small whole length, book under his right arm. Hollar f. InCarter's Honour,"&c. Humphrey Henchman, who was educated at Clare-hall, in Cam- Translated

from Salisbridge, was, for his merit, promoted to the chantorship of Salis

bury, Sept. bury, in the reign of Charles I. He was one of those that helped to 15, 1663. conceal Charles II. and were instrumental to his escape, after the battle of Worcester. Several of the royalists who assisted the king upon this important occasion, were rewarded by him at the restoration, and were then among the most popular persons in the kingdom. Dr. Henchman succeeded Dr. Duppa in the see of Salisbury, and was removed to London upon the translation of Dr. Sheldon to Canterbury. He was, soon after his removal, made lord-almoner. When the declaration for liberty of conscience was published, he was much alarmed, and strictly enjoined his clergy to preach

* See more in the “ Querela Cantabrigiensis," at the end of the “ Mercurius Rusticus,” p. 4, & seq. It is there said, that some actually made it their business to get them sold to Algiers for slaves.

+ He had the honour of being reported the author of the “Whole Duty of Man," now ascertained to have been written by Lady Packington. See Masters's "i History of Corpus-Christi College, in Cambridge,” where there is a good account of him.

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