Elements of Military Art and Science: Or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactics of Battles, &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery, and Engineers

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D. Appleton, 1862 - 449 sider
 

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I
7
II
35
III
61
IV
88
V
114
VI
135
VII
155
VIII
210
IX
235
X
256
XI
275
XII
300
XIII
327
XIV
342
XV
378

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Side 178 - Lord Nelson has directions to spare Denmark when no longer resisting. But if the firing is continued on the part of Denmark, Lord Nelson will be obliged to set on fire all the floating batteries he has taken, without having the power of saving the brave Danes who have defended them.
Side 278 - The interpretation of the last bears evident marks of its recent origin ; probably as late as the close of the sixteenth, or the beginning of the seventeenth century, when the ancient hieroglyphics were read with the eye of faith, rather than of reason.
Side 196 - ... the foe, unless we can control the chances of finding the enemy's fleet within his- port, and the still more uncertain chance of keeping him there ; the escape of a single vessel being sufficient to cause the loss of our harbor.
Side 379 - Whatever argument may be drawn from particular examples, superficially viewed, a thorough examination of the subject will evince, that the art of war is at once comprehensive and complicated ; that it demands much previous study ; and that the possession of it, in its most improved and perfect state, is always of great moment to the security of a nation.
Side 309 - French corps d'armee which has not a battalion of sappers and a company of miners. But we are obliged to depend for assistance of this description upon the regiments of the line ; and although the men are brave and willing, they want the knowledge and training which are necessary. Many casualties among them consequently occur, and much valuable time is lost at the most critical period of the siege.
Side 194 - Not less than five hundred pieces of ordnance were directed against the walls, and the precision with which the fire was kept up, the position of the vessels, and, lastly, the blowing up of the large magazine — all aided in achieving this great victory in so short a time. He had thought it right to say thus much, because he wished to warn the public against supposing that such deeds as this could be effected, every day.

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