Master Humphrey's Clock, Volum 2

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Baudry's European Library, 1841
 

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Side 111 - Oh ! ever thus, from childhood's hour, I've seen my fondest hopes decay ; I never loved a tree or flower, But 'twas the first to fade away. I never nursed a dear gazelle, To glad me with its soft black eye, • But when it came to know me well, And love me, it was sure to die...
Side 221 - And now the bell — the bell she had so often heard by night and day, and listened to with solemn pleasure, almost as a living voice — rung its remorseless toll for her, so young, so beautiful, so good. Decrepit age, and vigorous life, and blooming youth, and helpless infancy, poured forth — on crutches, in the pride of health and strength, in the full blush of promise, in the mere dawn of life — to gather round her tomb.
Side 218 - Where were the traces of her early cares, her sufferings and fatigues ? All gone. Sorrow was dead indeed in her, but peace and perfect happiness were born — imaged in her tranquil beauty and profound repose. " And still her former self lay there, unaltered in this change. Yes. The old fireside had smiled upon that same sweet face ; it had passed, like a dream, through haunts of misery and care ; at the door of the poor schoolmaster on the summer evening, before the furnacefire upon the cold, wet...
Side 156 - Statutes in that case made and provided, and against the peace of our Sovereign Lord the King, his crown, and dignity.
Side 222 - A whisper went about among the oldest there, that she had seen and talked with angels ; and when they called to mind how she had looked and spoken, and her early death, some thought it might be so indeed. Thus, coming to the grave in little knots, and glancing down, and giving place to others, and falling off in whispering groups of three or four, the church was cleared in time of all but the sexton and the mourning friends. They saw the vault covered and the stone fixed down. Then, when the dusk...
Side 176 - Since laws were made for every degree, To curb vice in others as well as in me, I wonder we ha'n't better company Upon Tyburn Tree!
Side 121 - Could you eat any bread and meat?" said Dick, taking down his hat. " Yes? Ah ! I thought so, Did you ever taste beer?" " I had a sip of it once," said the small servant. "Here's a state of things!
Side 222 - When Death strikes down the innocent and young, for every fragile form from which he lets the panting spirit free, a hundred virtues rise, in shapes of mercy, charity, and love, to walk the world, and bless it. Of every tear that sorrowing mortals shed on such green graves, some good is born, some gentler nature comes. In the Destroyer's steps there spring up bright creations that defy his power, and his dark path becomes a way of light to Heaveu.
Side 218 - The old man held one languid arm in his, and had the small hand tight folded to his breast, for warmth. It was the hand she had stretched out to him with her last smile — the hand that had led him on through all their wanderings. Ever and anon he pressed it to his lips; then hugged it to his breast...

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