The First Book of World Law: A Compilation of the International Conventions to which the Principal Nations are Signatory, with a Survey of Their Significance

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 2005 - 308 sider
Bridgman, Raymond L, Editor. The First Book of World Law: A Compilation of the International Conventions to Which the Principal Nations are Signatory, With a Survey of Their Significance. Published for the World Peace Foundation. [Boston]: Ginn and Company Publishers, 1911. v, 308 pp. Reprint available May 2005 by the Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN 1-58477-555-6. Cloth. $85. * Included in the list of important titles recommended for all working libraries of international law by Fenwick, this book contains the complete texts of key international conventions that were in force at the time of publication. These are arranged by topic into 22 chapters, each with extensive introductions and annotations. Civil and military matters are given equal attention, as are agreements dealing with governmental and non-governmental agencies. Fenwick, International Law (3rd. ed.) xxv-l.

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Innhold

BEGINNINGS OF WORLD ORGANIZATION
1
THE FIRST BOOK OF WORLD LAW
7
ANTECEDENTS OF THE WORLD LEGISLATURE
10
THE UNIVERSAL POSTAL UNION
17
WORLD LAW IN ARBITRATION
72
WORLD LAW CONCERNING NAVIGATION
147
DISARMAMENT
165
THE WORLDS PRIME MERIDIAN
170
REPRESSION OF THE SLAVE TRADE AND RESTRICTION OF CERTAIN IMPORTATIONS INTO AFRICA
226
TRADE IN WHITE WOMEN
246
INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF AGRICULTURE
248
THE INTERNATIONAL RED CROSS
251
BUREAU OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES
257
WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY
264
EXCHANGE OF DOCUMENTS
281
THE WORLD JUDICIARY
283

THE GENEVA CONVENTION FOR THE SEA
172
INTERNATIONAL SANITATION
174
PROTECTION OF INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY
215
PROTECTION OF SUBMARINE CABLES
221
THE WORLD EXECUTIVE
298
PEACE AND GOOD WILL
301
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Side 156 - Nothing in these rules shall exonerate any vessel, or the owner or master or crew thereof, from the consequences of any neglect to carry lights or signals, or of any neglect to keep a proper lookout, or of the neglect of any precaution which may be required by the ordinary practice of seamen, or by the special circumstances of the case.
Side 148 - The said green and red side lights shall be fitted with inboard screens projecting at least three feet forward from the light, so as to prevent these lights from being seen across the bow.
Side 148 - These two lights shall be so placed in line with the keel that one shall be at least 15 feet higher than the other, and in such a position with reference to each other that the lower light shall be forward of the upper one. The vertical distance between these lights shall be less than the horizontal distance.
Side 150 - On the near approach of or to other vessels they shall have their side lights lighted, ready for use, and shall flash or show them at short intervals, to indicate the direction in which they are heading, but the green light shall not be shown on the port side, nor the red light on the starboard side. A pilot-vessel of such a class as to be obliged to go alongside of a...
Side 98 - The present convention shall be ratified as soon as possible. The ratifications shall be deposited at The Hague. The first deposit of ratifications shall be recorded in a...
Side 156 - When a vessel is in distress and requires assistance from other vessels or from the shore, the following shall be the signals to be used or displayed by her, either together or separately, viz. : — ' In the daytime — 1. A gun or other explosive signal fired at intervals of about a minute.
Side 103 - Until a more complete code of the laws of war has been issued, the High Contracting Parties deem it expedient to declare that, in cases not included in the Regulations adopted by them, the inhabitants and the belligerents remain under the protection and the rule of the principles of the law of nations, as they result from the usages established among civilized peoples, from the laws of humanity, and the dictates of the public conscience.
Side 150 - Pilot vessels, when engaged on their station on pilotage duty, shall not show the lights required for other vessels, but shall carry a white light at the masthead, visible all round the horizon, and shall also exhibit a flare-up light or flare-up lights at short intervals, which shall never exceed fifteen minutes.
Side 148 - A steam vessel when under way shall carry — (a) On or in front of the foremast, or If a vessel without a foremast, then in the fore part of the vessel, at a height above the hull of not less than...
Side 150 - ... shall be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision, so that the green light shall not be seen on the port side nor the red light on the starboard side.

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