Shakespeare's Venvs & Adonis

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J.M. Dent & Company, 1593 - 106 sider
 

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Side iv - No man was ever yet a great poet, without being at the same time a profound philosopher. For poetry is the blossom and the fragrancy of all human knowledge, human thoughts, human passions, emotions, language.
Side 96 - A belt of straw and ivy buds With coral clasps and amber studs : And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me and be my Love.
Side 96 - IF all the world and love were young, And truth in every shepherd's tongue, These pretty pleasures might me move To live with thee and be thy love.
Side 47 - Love comforteth like sunshine after rain, But lust's effect is tempest after sun ; Love's gentle spring doth always fresh remain, Lust's winter comes ere summer half be done : Love surfeits not, lust like a glutton dies ; Love is all truth, lust full of forged lies.
Side 80 - If music and sweet poetry agree, As they must needs, the sister and the brother, Then must the love be great 'twixt thee and me, Because thou lov'st the one, and I the other. Dowland to thee is dear, whose heavenly touch Upon the lute doth ravish human sense; Spenser to me, whose deep conceit is such As, passing all conceit, needs no defence. Thou lov'st to hear the sweet melodious sound That Phoebus...
Side 19 - Look when a painter would surpass the life In limning out a well-proportion'd steed, His art with nature's workmanship at strife, As if the dead the living should exceed: So did this horse excel a common one, In shape, in courage, colour, pace and bone.
Side 73 - When my love swears that she is made of truth I do believe her, though I know she lies, That she might think me some untutor'd youth, Unlearned in the world's false subtleties. Thus vainly thinking that she thinks me young, Although she knows my days are past the best, Simply I credit her false-speaking tongue: On both sides thus is simple truth suppress'd.
Side 98 - Every one that flatters thee Is no friend in misery. Words are easy, like the wind; Faithful friends are hard to find: Every man will be thy friend Whilst thou hast wherewith to spend; But if store of crowns be scant, No man will supply thy want. If that one be prodigal, Bountiful they will him call, And with such-like flattering, 'Pity but he were a king...
Side 97 - Fie, fie, fie,' now would she cry ; ' Tereu, tereu ! ' by and by ; That to hear her so complain, Scarce I could from tears refrain ; For her griefs, so lively shown, Made me think upon mine own. Ah, thought I, thou mourn'st in vain ! None takes pity on thy pain : Senseless trees they cannot hear thee ; Ruthless...
Side iv - Shakespeare's poems the creative power and the intellectual energy wrestle as in a war embrace. Each in its excess of strength seems to threaten the extinction of the other. At length in the drama they were reconciled, and fought each with its shield before the breast of the other. Or like two rapid streams that, at their first meeting within narrow and rocky banks, mutually strive to repel each other and intermix reluctantly and in tumult, but soon finding a wider channel and more yielding shores...

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