The Fruit Cultivator's Manual: Containing Ample Directions for the Cultivation of the Most Important Fruits Including Cranberry, the Fig, and Grape, with Descriptive Lists of the Most Admired Varieties, and a Calendar, Showing the Work Necessary to be Done in the Orchard and Fruit Garden Every Month of the Year. The Whole Adapted to the Climate of the United States

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Author, Broadway, Corner of Eighteenth, 1844 - 175 sider

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Side 28 - OBSERVATIONS ON THE DISEASES, DEFECTS, AND INJURIES, | IN ALL KINDS OF FRUIT AND FOREST TREES." WITH AN ACCOUNT OF | A PARTICULAR METHOD OF CURE, | PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF GOVERNMENT.
Side 51 - that more than one hundred men, during a siege, were kept alive for nearly two months, without any other sustenance than a little of this gum taken sometimes into the mouth, and suffered gradually to dissolve.
Side 25 - GRAFTING. Grafting is the taking a shoot from one tree and inserting it into another in such a manner that both may unite closely and become one tree. These shoots are called scions or grafts, and in the choice of them and the mode of preparing some Descriptions of stocks, the following hints...
Side 23 - ... wood of the stock, instead of into the earth, and form new layers of wood, instead of subterranean fibres. The success of such practices, however, depends upon other causes than those which influence the growth of cuttings. It is necessary that an adhesion should take place between the scion and the stock, so that when the descending fibres of the buds shall have fixed themselves upon the wood of the stock, they may not be liable to subsequent separation. No one can have studied the economy of...
Side 141 - Garden, what he thinks the method should be upon which a more competent person would do well to proceed. All our fruits, without exception, have been so much ameliorated by one circumstance or another, that they no longer bear any resemblance in respect of quality to their original. Who, for instance, would...
Side 69 - ... ripening of the fruit : on which account it is an important part of pruning to keep the middle of the head open and clear, and to let the occasional shortening of the shoots be sparing and moderate. Between the bearing branches keep a regulated distance of at least six inches at the extremities, which will render them fertile bearers of good fruit.
Side 28 - ... till the whole is covered over with it, letting it remain for half an hour to absorb the moisture ; then apply more powder, rubbing it on gently with the hand, and repeating the application of the powder till the whole plaster becomes a dry smooth surface.
Side 142 - ... or young seed. Once deposited there, the particle swells, increases gradually in size, separates into radicle and cotyledons, and finally becomes the embryo, — that part which is to give birth, when the seed is sown, to a new individual. " Such being the mode in which the pollen influences the stigma and subsequently the seed, a practical consequence of great importance necessarily follows, viz. that in all cases of...
Side 174 - ... to which is added a calendar to each part: showing the work necessary to be done in the various departments each month of the year.
Side 26 - ... formed ; perfect success is the more certain when this is the case. The scion is now to be carefully inserted, so that the inner bark of the scion and of the stock may both exactly meet. Large stocks require two scions, one on each side ; sometimes four are inserted.

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