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SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES

ALLOTMENT OF JUSTICES It is ordered that the following allotment be made of the Chief Justice and Associate Justices of this Court among the circuits, pursuant to Title 28, United States Code, Section 42, and that such allotment be entered of record, effective November 1, 1991, viz.:

For the District of Columbia Circuit, WILLIAM H. REHNQUIST, Chief Justice.

For the First Circuit, DAVID H. SOUTER, Associate Justice.
For the Second Circuit, CLARENCE THOMAS, Associate Justice.
For the Third Circuit, DAVID H. SOUTER, Associate Justice.
For the Fourth Circuit, WILLIAM H. REHNQUIST, Chief Justice.
For the Fifth Circuit, ANTONIN SCALIA, Associate Justice.
For the Sixth Circuit, JOHN PAUL STEVENS, Associate Justice.
For the Seventh Circuit, JOHN PAUL STEVENS, Associate Justice.
For the Eighth Circuit, HARRY A. BLACKMUN, Associate Justice.

For the Ninth Circuit, SANDRA DAY O'CONNOR, Associate Justice.

For the Tenth Circuit, BYRON R. WHITE, Associate Justice.

For the Eleventh Circuit, ANTHONY M. KENNEDY, Associate Justice.

For the Federal Circuit, WILLIAM H. REHNQUIST, Chief Justice. November 1, 1991.

(For next previous allotment, and modifications, see 498 U. S., p. VI, and 501 U. S., p. V.)

DEATH OF JUSTICE MARSHALL

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES

MONDAY, JANUARY 25, 1993

Present: CHIEF JUSTICE REHNQUIST, JUSTICE BLACKMUN, JUSTICE O'CONNOR, JUSTICE SCALIA, JUSTICE KENNEDY, JUSTICE SOUTER, and JUSTICE THOMAS.

THE CHIEF JUSTICE said:

As we open this morning, I announce with sadness that our friend and colleague Thurgood Marshall, a former Justice of this Court, died yesterday, January 24, 1993, at the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland.

Born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1908, Thurgood Marshall was the grandson of a Union soldier, his namesake, and a great-grandson of a slave. His father worked as a diningcar waiter and a chief steward at a segregated club, and early instilled in his son the urge to question the legal status of minorities in this country. His mother taught school for over three decades and devoted herself to her two sons while they were growing up. Justice Marshall worked his way through Lincoln University and excelled at Howard University Law School under the tutelage of Charles Houston.

After a brief period in solo practice in Baltimore, Justice Marshall joined the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, eventually becoming its special counsel and, later, its director. The most influential civil rights lawyer of this century, Justice Marshall designed and implemented the NAACP's legal strategy to eradicate racial discrimination in education, transportation, housing, and the voting booth. In

courthouses across the country, he became the champion of equal opportunity for minorities. As an advocate, Justice Marshall won 29 cases before this Court, including the landmark Brown v. Board of Education.

He left the NAACP when President Kennedy appointed him to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in 1961. In 1965, President Johnson named him Solicitor General and, two years later, appointed him an Associate Justice of this Court.

Justice Marshall's contributions to constitutional law before his appointment to this Court were singular. These contributions alone would entitle him to a prominent place in American history had he never served on this Court. Building on those earlier accomplishments, he became an important voice in shaping the decisional law during his twenty-four years on the Supreme Court bench.

The members of this Court will miss Justice Marshall's wit, warmth and charm, and I speak for them in expressing our profound sympathy to Mrs. Marshall, her sons Thurgood and John, the remainder of the Marshall family, and all those whose lives were touched by this extraordinary man. The recess this Court takes today will be in his memory. At an appropriate time, the traditional memorial observance of the Court and the Bar of the Court will be held in this Courtroom.

TABLE OF CASES REPORTED

NOTE: All undesignated references herein to the United States Code are to the 1988 edition.

Cases reported before page 801 are those decided with opinions of the Court or decisions per curiam. Cases reported on page 801 et seq. are those in which orders were entered. The opinion reported on page 1301 et seq. is that written in chambers by an individual Justice.

Page

A-Abart Electric Supply, Inc. v. Emerson Electric Co.

867 Abate v. Goldsmith ....

991 Abbott v. United States

888 Abbott House; Admin'r, N. Y. C. Dept., Human Resources v.

954 Abdal Matiyn v. McKaskle

1025 Abeita v. United States

1040 Abel v. Pennsylvania

839 Abello-Silva v. United States

835,1087 Abilene; Creel v. ......

962 Abrahamson; Brecht v.

806 Abusayed v. United States

924 Acevedo-Ramos v. United States

905 ACF Industries, Inc.; Department of Revenue of Ore. v.

811,913 Ackerman v. Citibank (Ariz.)

1088 Ackerman, Hood & McQueen, Inc. v. EEOC

817 ACME Resin Corp. v. Ashland Oil, Inc.

865 Acoy v. New York ..

838 Ada v. Guam Society of Obstetricians & Gynecologists

1011 Ada County Sheriff; Stevenson v.

1064 Adams v. Children's Mercy Hospital

991 Adams; Keene Corp. v.

973 Adams v. United States

871,1020 Adamson v. Runyon

976 Adetiba v. United States

845 Adkins v. Ratelle

883 Adkins v. Safeway, Inc.

1049 Adler; Davenport v.

837 Administrator, N. Y. City Dept., Human Resources v. Abbott House 954 Administrator of Veterans Affairs; Traylor v.

959

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