The national reading books, adapted to the government code. adapted to the new code, 1871, Volum 5

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Side 94 - ... falling waters, human voices, and musical instruments. Gladness grew in me upon the discovery of so delightful a scene. I wished for the wings of an eagle, that I might fly away to those happy seats; but the genius told me there was no passage to them except through the gates of death that I saw opening every moment upon the bridge.
Side 92 - The bridge thou seest, said he, is Human Life ; consider it attentively. Upon a more leisurely survey of it, I found that it consisted of threescore and ten entire arches, with several broken arches, which added to those that were entire made up the number about an hundred.
Side 91 - He then led me to the highest pinnacle of the rock, and placing me on the top of it, ' Cast thy eyes eastward,' said he, 'and tell me what thou seest.' ' I see,' said I, ' a huge valley, and a prodigious tide of water rolling through it.
Side 91 - As I looked upon him, he applied it to his lips, and began to play upon it. The sound of it was exceeding sweet, and wrought into a variety of tunes that were inexpressibly melodious, and altogether different from any thing I had ever heard. They put me in mind of those heavenly airs that are played to the departed souls of good men upon their first arrival...
Side 199 - Hovered thy spirit o'er thy sorrowing son, Wretch even then, life's journey just begun ? Perhaps thou gavest me, though unfelt, a kiss ; Perhaps a tear, if souls can weep in bliss ; Ah, that maternal smile, it answers yes...
Side 200 - Dupe of to-morrow even from a child. Thus many a sad to-morrow came and went, Till, all my stock of infant sorrow spent, I learned at last submission to my lot; But, though I less deplored thee, ne'er forgot. Where once we dwelt our name is heard no more, Children not thine have trod my nursery floor; And where the gardener Robin, day by day, Drew me to school along the public way, Delighted with my bauble coach, and wrapped In scarlet mantle warm, and velvet capped, 'Tis now become a history little...
Side 197 - HAIL, beauteous stranger of the grove ! Thou messenger of spring ! Now Heaven repairs thy rural seat, And woods thy welcome sing. What time the daisy decks the green, $ Thy certain voice we hear ; Hast thou a star to guide thy path, Or mark the rolling year ? Delightful visitant, with thee I hail the time of flowers, 10 And hear the sound of music sweet From birds among the bowers.
Side 93 - Alas ! ' said I, ' man was made in vain ; how is he given away to misery and mortality, tortured in life, and swallowed up in death ! ' " The genius, being moved with compassion towards me, bid me quit so uncomfortable a prospect. ' Look no more,' said he, ' on man in the first stage of his existence, in his setting out for eternity ; but cast thine eye on that thick mist into which the tide bears the several generations of mortals that fall into it.
Side 91 - I had been often told that the rock before me was the haunt of a genius; and that several had been entertained with music who had passed by it, but never heard that the musician had before made himself visible. When he had raised my thoughts by those transporting airs...
Side 190 - The insurance offices one and all shut up shop. People built slighter and slighter every day, until it was feared that the very science of architecture would in no long time be lost to the world. Thus this custom of firing houses continued...

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