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MINUTES,

OFFICIAL REPORTS,

AND

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES.

THE NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION,

FIRST DAY'S PROCEEDINGS.

THE WELCOME. The Association met at noon, July 16, 1889, in Richland Park, in the suburbs of Nashville, Tennessee.

The meeting was called to order by W. R. Garrett, chairman of the Local Executive Committee.

Prayer was offered by Rev. B. M. De Witt, of Nashville.

Addresses of welcome were made by the Governor, Robert L. Taylor, who spoke in behalf of Tennessee; by Frank M. Smith, State Superintendent of Instruction, who represented the teachers of Tennessee, and who read an “Ode to the National Educational Association," written by Mrs Odia H. Newhouse, of Nashville; and by Mr. Garrett, representing the Local Executive Committee. An original poem was read by Miss Dolly Finnegan, of Nashville.

Responses were made by the President and Secretary of the Association; by William E. Sheldon, of Boston; E. B. McElroy, of Oregon; J. L. Pickard, of Iowa; D. L. Kiehle, of Minnesota; J. M. Greenwood, of Missouri; Thomas Kirtland, of Toronto; and J. A. B. Lovett, of Alabama. No

papers were read, and no formal business was undertaken, the meeting and the barbecue, which followed, being in the nature of a reception tendered by the citizens of Nashville, under the lead of Dr. William Morrow, to the Association.

After the responses, the Association adjourned to the barbecue, spread in the same park, at the close of which the members returned to the city at will.

EVENING SESSION.

The first regular session of the Association was called to order in the Theater Vendome, Nashville, Tennessee, at eight o'clock, on the evening of July 16, 1889; President Marble in the chair.

Prayer was offered by Rev. B. F. Haynes, of the McKendree Methodist Church, Nashville.

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2-N. E. A.

President Marble made some brief opening remarks.

Rev. J. A. B. Lovett, of Huntsville, Alabama, asked the courtesy of a few moments of the time of the Association, which was granted.

Dr. A. B. Jones, of the Huntsville Female College, then presented the Association with a gavel of shittim wood bound with gold — a gift from Mr. Lovett. President Marble made suitable

response. Mr. Lovett then presented to each of the three executive officers a piece of shittim wood decorated by Miss Howard Wheaton, of Huntsville, Alabama.

President Marble appropriately replied.

Mr. Woodward, of St. Louis, Missouri, then read a paper on: The Results of Manual Training in the St. Louis Schools.

William T. Harris, of Concord, Massachusetts, then read a paper on: The Intellectual Value of Tool Work.

Selim H. Peabody, of Champaign, Illinois, then spoke on: The Value of Manual Training as Related to the Active Pursuits in which Pupils may Subsequently Engage.

The session then adjourned.

SECOND DAY'S PROCEEDINGS.

MORNING SESSION.

The second regular session of the Association was called to order in the Theater Vendome, Wednesday morning at nine o'clock; President Marble in the chair.

Prayer was offered by Rev. J. Witherspoon, D.D., of Nashville.
The usual notices were given by the Secretary.

A paper was read by Henry A. Wise, of Baltimore, on: To what Extent May Manual Training be Introduced at this Time Into the Public Schools.

Rt. Rev. John J. Keane, of Washington, D. C., then read a paper prepared by Cardinal Gibbons, of Baltimore, on: Should Americans Educate Their Children in Denominational Schools ?

Bishop Keane followed this with a paper of his own on the same topic.

Edward D. Mead, of Boston, read a paper on: Has the Denominational School a Proper Place in America ?

Bishop Keane rejoined.

Mr. Eaton moved that the President appoint the constitutional committees at his convenience.

Carried.
The session then adjourned.

EVENING SESSION.

The third regular session of the Association was held in the Theater Vendome, on Wednesday evening, at eight o'clock; President Marble in the chair.

Prayer was offered by Rev. Dr. Martin, of Nashville.
The usual notices were read.
The Chair then announced the following committees :

On Honorary Members.—John Hancock, of Ohio, Chairman; Miss Higbee, Tennessee; George Howland, Illinois; L. S. Thompson, New Jersey; Joseph Baldwin, Texas.

On Resolutions.-E. E. White, of Ohio, Chairman; John M. Bloss, Kansas; J. B. Merwin, Missouri; J. A. B. Lovett, Alabama; Alexander Hogg, Texas; Mrs. F. Stuart Parker, Illinois; C. J. Prescott, New Jersey.

On Nominations.-Aaron Gove, of Colorado, Chairman; Solomon Palmer, Alabama; T. A. Futrall, Arkansas; Nora A. Smith, California; Z. Richards, District of Columbia; John P. Patterson, Florida; W. F. Slaton, Georgia; N. C. Dougherty, Illinois; W. A. Bell, Indiana; Henry Sabin, Iowa; H. G. Larimer, Kansas; W. P. Maple, Kentucky; George Ramsey, Louisiana; H. A. Wise, Maryland; W. E. Sheldon, Massachusetts; I. M. Wellington, Michigan; Irwin Shepard, Minnesota; J. T. Perrin, Mississippi; J. M. Greenwood, Missouri; E. A. Steere, Montana; E. H. Cook, New Jersey; T. Marcellus Marshall, New Mexico; J.H. Hoose, New York; P. P. Claxton, North Carolina; C. C. Davidson, Ohio; E. B. McElroy, Oregon; H. S. Jones, Pennsylvania; H. S. Tarbell, Rhode Island; D. B. Johnson, South Carolina; Wharton S. Jones, Tennessee; Joseph Baldwin, Texas; Wm. F. Fox, Virginia; Albert Salisbury, Wisconsin.

Telegrams and letters were then read inviting the members of the Association to visit Chattanooga and Knoxville, and extending the courtesy of those cities.

Wharton S. Jones, of Memphis, then presented to the Association the greeting and invitation of that city.

The Secretary announced the birth, at the Hermitage, of a grandson of the adopted son of General Jackson; and that the child had been named Albert Prescott Marble, in honor of the Association and its President.

On motion of Wharton S. Jones, of Memphis, the chair was directed to appoint a committee of twenty-five to wait upon Mrs. James K. Polk with the respects and congratulations of the Association.

A. S. Draper, of New York, read a paper on: The Legal Status of the Public Schools.

The President called Ex-President Richards to the chair.

William A. Mowry, of Massachusetts, read a paper on: A National Oniversity.

John H. Burrus, of Mississippi, then read a paper on: Educational Progress of the Colored People in the South.

The meeting then adjourned.

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