The Speeches of the Right Honourable William Pitt, in the House of Commons, Volum 3

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1808
 

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Side 67 - Ireland have severally agreed and resolved, that, in order to promote and secure the essential interests of Great Britain and Ireland, and to consolidate the strength, power, and resources of the British Empire, it will be advisable to concur in such measures as may best tend to unite the two kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland...
Side 67 - Ireland shall, upon the first day of January which shall be in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and one, and for ever after, be united into one kingdom, by the name of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland...
Side 133 - Jacobin has abjured ; every thing that a sincere and faithful royalist must feel as an insult. If he is opposed at any time in his career, what is his appeal ? He appeals to his fortune ; in other words, to his army and his sword. Placing, then, his whole reliance upon military support, can he afford to let his military renown pass away, to let his laurels wither, to let the memory of his...
Side 89 - It is not so. We are not in arms against the opinions of the closet, nor the speculations of the school. We are at war with armed opinions ; we are at war with those opinions which the sword of audacious, unprincipled, and impious innovation seeks to propagate amidst the ruins of empires, the demolition of the altars of all religion, the destruction of every venerable, and good, and liberal institution, under whatever form of polity...
Side 146 - France ; but that we are not, therefore, pledged to any unalterable determination as to our future conduct ; that in this we must be regulated by the course of events ; and that it will be the duty of his Majesty's ministers from time to time to adapt their measures to any variation of circumstances, to consider how far the effects of the military operations of the allies or of the internal disposition of France correspond with our present expectations ; and, on a view of the whole, to compare the...
Side 68 - ... the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and that such a number of lords spiritual and temporal, and such a number of members of the house of commons as shall be hereafter agreed upon by acts of the respective parliaments as aforesaid, shall sit and vote in. the said parliament on the part of Ireland, and shall be summoned, chosen, and returned, in such manner as shall be fixed by an act of the parliament...
Side 424 - My idea was not to apply tests to the religious tenets of the Catholics, but tests applicable to what was the source and foundation of the evil; to render the priests, instead of making them the instruments of poisoning the minds of the people, dependent in some sort upon the government, and thus links, as it were, between the government and the people.
Side 48 - ... with much greater safety than it could be in a separate legislature. In the second place, I think it certain that, even for whatever period it may be thought necessary, after the Union, to withhold from the Catholics the enjoyment of those advantages, many of the objections which at present arise out of their situation would be removed if the Protestant legislature were no longer separate and local, but general and imperial...
Side 128 - Genoa we shall find, not only a continuation of the same system of extortion and plunder, in violation of the solemn pledge contained in the proclamations already referred to, but a striking instance of the revolutionary means employed for the destruction of independent governments. A French minister was at that time resident at...
Side 405 - That it appears to this committee, that the commissioners appointed ' to examine, take, and state the public accounts of the kingdom...

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