History of Education

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American Book Company, 1904 - 343 sider
 

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Side 283 - Washington a department of education for the purpose of collecting such statistics and facts as shall show the condition and progress of education in the several States and Territories and of diffusing such information respecting the organization and management of schools and school systems, and methods of teaching, as shall aid the people of the United States in the establishment and maintenance of efficient school systems, and otherwise promote the cause of education throughout the country.
Side 193 - I call, therefore, a complete and generous education that which fits a man to perform justly, skillfully, and magnanimously all the offices both private and public, of peace and war.
Side 192 - The end then of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him, as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of true virtue, which being united to the heavenly grace of faith, makes up the highest perfection.
Side 222 - Thus the whole education of women ought to be relative to men. To | please them, to be useful to them, to make themselves loved and honored by them, to educate them when young, to care for them when grown, to counsel them, to console them, and to make life agreeable and sweet to them— these are the duties of women at all times, and what should be taught them from their infancy.
Side 217 - All at once I felt myself dazzled by a thousand sparkling lights ; crowds of vivid ideas thronged into my mind with a force and confusion that threw me into unspeakable agitation.; I felt my head whirling in a giddiness like that of intoxication. A violent palpitation oppressed me; unable to walk for difficulty of breathing, I sank under one of the trees of the avenue, and passed half an hour there in such a condition of excitement, that when I arose, I saw that the front of my waistcoat was all...
Side 28 - Learning without thought is labour lost; thought without learning is perilous.' CHAP. XVI. The Master said, The study of strange doctrines is injurious indeed!' CHAP. XVII. The Master said, 'Yu, shall I teach you what knowledge is? When you know a thing, to hold that you know it; and when you do not know a thing, to allow that you do not know it;— this is knowledge.
Side 165 - First, let him teach the child cheerfully and plainly the cause and matter of the Letter ; then let him construe it into English, so oft as the child may easily carry away the understanding of it; lastly, parse it over perfectly. This done thus, let the child, by and by, both construe and parse it over again ; so that it may appear that the child doubteth in nothing that his master taught him before.
Side 99 - Then said he unto the dresser of his vineyard, Behold, these three years I come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and find none: cut it down; why cumbereth it the ground?
Side 261 - This institution is the greatest discovery ever made by man: we repeat it, the common school is the greatest discovery ever made by man. In two grand, characteristic attributes, it is supereminent over all others: first, in its universality, for it is capacious enough to receive and cherish in its parental bosom every child that comes into the world; and, second, in the timeliness of the aid it proffers, — its early, seasonable supplies of counsel and guidance making security antedate danger.
Side 181 - Upon advised consideration of the charges," said he, " descending into my own conscience, and calling my memory to account so far as I am able, I do plainly and ingenuously confess that I am guilty of corruption, and do renounce all defence.

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