The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volum 3

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A. Hart, late Carey & Hart, 1850
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Side 372 - It is the glory of God to conceal a thing : but the honour of kings is to search out a matter.
Side 225 - IT were infinite for the law to judge the causes of causes, and their impulsions one of another ; therefore, it contenteth itself with the immediate cause, and judgeth of acts by that, without looking to any further degree.
Side 33 - ... stand at a stay. And surely I may not endure in public place to be wronged without repelling the same to my best advantage to right myself. You are great, and therefore have the more enviers, which would be glad to have you paid at another's cost.
Side 32 - Mr. Attorney, I THOUGHT best, once for all, to let you know in plainness what I find of you, and what you shall find of me. You take to yourself a liberty to disgrace and disable my law, my experience, my discretion. What it pleaseth you, I pray, think of me : I am one that knows both mine own wants and other men's ; and it may be, perchance, that mine mend, when others stand at a stay.
Side 184 - My very good Lords, I humbly pray your lordships all to make a favourable and true construction of my absence. It is no feigning or fainting, but sickness both of my heart and of my back, though joined with that comfort of mind that persuadeth me that I am not far from Heaven, whereof I feel the first fruits.
Side 49 - ... bespoken in the shop ; and if her Majesty will not take me, it may be the selling by parcels will be more gainful. For to be, as I told you, like a child following a bird, which when he is nearest flieth away and lighteth a little before, and then the child after it again, and so in infinitum, I am weary of it ; as also of wearying my good friends : of whom, nevertheless, I hope in one course or other gratefully to deserve.
Side 22 - I have brought unto you gemitum columbcz from others ; now I bring it from myself. I fly unto Your Majesty with the wings of a dove, which once within these seven days I thought would have carried me a higher flight. "When I enter into myself I find not the materials of such a tempest as is comen upon me. I have been, as Your Majesty knoweth best, never author of any immoderate counsel, but always desired to have things carried suavibus modis.
Side 240 - ALL crimes have their conception in a corrupt intent, and have their consummation and issuing in some particular fact ; which though it be not the fact at which the intention of the malefactor levelled, yet the law giveth him no advantage of that error if another particular ensue of as high a nature.
Side 55 - ... that hath the advantage of my affection, and knoweth it ; of an estate not grounded to his greatness ; of a popular reputation ; of a military dependence. I demand, whether there can be a more dangerous image than this, represented to any monarch living, much more to a lady, and of her majesty's apprehension ? And is it not more evident than demonstration itself, that whilst this impression continueth in her majesty's breast, you can find no other condition, than inventions to keep your estate...
Side 312 - ... of the same rent, of and in such like estate as they had in the title, interest, or use of the said rent or profit, and as if a sufficient grant or other lawful conveyance had been made and executed to them, by such as were or shall be seised...

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