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the earth of the incumbrance as hastily as possible. If there is a town plat in the county where a native forest tree stands on the same ground where its growth commenced, the writer does not know the fact; but if there are cases of this character, they must be exceptional. Upon the grounds, in Bryan, where now rests the court house, and for miles surrounding it, there was as fine a body of forest timber as clothed any portion of the earth ; but it was all doomed to swift destruction directly after the county seat became established. A few years later, and when the denuded surface in the public square inclosure presented an appearance akin to desolation, the County Commissioners ordered transplanting evergreens and other exotics, but no provision was made in behalf of the magnificent trees originally supplied by nature, and that once covered nearly the entire surface of the county. On many streets in towns, and lining some public highways in the country, are discoverable the pestilential silver maple, whose multitudinous roots strike the wells and insinuate themselves through the walls, and defile, if they do not poison, the water. The introduction of small-pox into the country and towns of Williams County could scarcely inflict greater evil on animal life than the transplanting of some of the foreign shade and so-called “ornamental,” trees that have superseded the ones that God planted upon this soil. Some of the streets of towns, as if in very mockery, bear the names of Beach, Lin, Walnut, Cherry, Mulberry, Maple, Sycamore, Elm, Hickory, Oak, Ash, etc., but the native tree will not be understood by future generations by the mere names of streets, which to them will be meaningless and have no significance; but the only true and secure method of symbolizing the grand native forestry is by transplantation upon public and private grounds, and on the public highways and streets, so that, in their season, their beautiful foliage and grateful shade will be ever present.

WILLIAMS COUNTY AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. No county in Northwestern Ohio, probably, possesses better elements to guarantee prosperity to an agricultural organization than this of Williams. Except the waters of a small lake and those that form river and and creek channels, there is not a waste acre in the county. Outside the the corporation of Bryan, the county contains 265,702 acres of arable land. The county society was founded in 1856, as appears by the official minutes. In compliance with notice, a number of citizens of Williams County convened in the court house at Bryan, June 14, 1865, to consider the matter of forming an agricultural society. The meeting was organized by appointing Levi Cunningham, Chairman, and David Morrow, Secretary. A committee of five was appointed to draft a constitution and by-laws, and the committee consisted of P. W. Norris, W. A. Smith,

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David Morrow, John Davis and E. G. Denman. The constitution being adopted and signed by those present, the meeting made choice of the following officers to serve during the present year: President, David Morrow; Vice Presidents, William Stubbs and E. G. Denman; Secretary, W. A. Smith; Treasurer, R. B. Rush ; Managers, P. D. Benson, Silas Gore, P. W. Norris, Daniel Farnham and Samuel Allen.

An adjourned meeting was held at the court house, August 6, and perfected a premium list, and the fair was fixed to be held at Bryan, on the 7th and 8th days of October. Although the premiums offered at this first fair were small in amount, the attendance was large, and the friends of the enterprise were much encouraged. This fair was held on the court house square. At a meeting of the board held February 10, 1857, it was resolved that the citizens of Defiance and Fulton be admitted as competitors for premiums on equal terms, except on field crops, with the citizens of Williams County.

GROUNDS FOR FAIR PURPOSES.

At a meeting of the board, held June 1, 1857, propositions were received for fair grounds, at which a committee appointed at a previous meeting reported, “that David Morrow offered ground one and one-fourth miles from the town, free. P. W. Norris, of Pioneer, offered as much ground as the society would need, in fee simple, and A. P. Edgerton offered the ground lying between the Evansport and Lafayette roads in the town of Bryan, for five years, provided the society intend to make permanent fixtures (which your committee would earnestly recommend), and they report the following resolution :

RESOLVED, That the President and Secretary be directed to contract with A. P. Edgerton for the use of said ground.”

After the expiration of this contract, the fairs were removed to the present grounds, where they have remained continuously.

LAST FAIR, AND CONDITION IN 1882. Amount in premiums offered in 1881, $2,250; amount awarded, $1,322; number of entries, 1,730; receipts of the fair, $2,165.60. Officers for 1882: President, John J. Rudisill; Vice President, B. Calvin ; Secretary, Robert N. Patterson ; Treasurer, J. W. Nelson. These officers are all busy and able workers, and the interests of the Williams County Agricultural Society are in the hands of intelligent and faithful officers.

JUNE FROST, of 1859. As untimely frosts have close relation to agriculture, it may not be out of place here to recur to the memorable frost which visited this portion

of the earth on the 4th of June, 1859, and which produced effects so desolating, that they can never be effaced from the memories of those who, at that date, were of an age to be impressed with so remarkable an event. On Sunday morning, June 5, after the sun appeared, and as its rays began to have influence, the extraordinary spectacle of utter blight was visible upon every grain field, every orchard, and upon even the foliage of forest and other trees: and yet, the day before gave promise of a good harvest. Ice formed in soine places to a thickness of three-fourths of an inch. “Wheat and rye froze in the blossom, corn in the stalk, potatoes and vines froze to the ground.” The weather was cold and changeable until the 4th day of July, in the morning, when there was another frost, not so devastating in its effects, only because only little little remained for destruction. The late Dr. S. P. Hildreth, of Marietta, records similar disasters as having occurred in 1816, and in 1834.

CONDITION OF THE COMMON SCHOOLS. Through the kindness of Hon. Charles A. Bowersox, of the Ohio House of Representatives, the following exhibit of the general condition of the common schools of the county, and of Bryan and Pulaski Township is given, as reported to him by the State Commissioner: Total Receipts: County

.$ 73,180 83 Bryan......

13,131 38 Pulaski Township...

6,213 38 Total Disbursements : County.....

$51,236 26 Bryan......

€,209 96 Pulaski Township...........

4.810 69 Receipts from State Tax or State Common School Fund : County.....

$8,879 75 Bryan.....

1,204 95 Pulaski Township..........

642 35 Interest received on “ Irreducible School Fund:” County.....

$2,872 87 Bryan......

136 88 Pulaski Township............

75 16 Youth enumerated in September, 1881 : County......

7,524 Bryan......

815 Pulaski Township....

484 Whole number of houses: County. .......

119 Bryan......

4 Pulaski Township........

9 Different teachers employed- Primary Schools: County.....

.Gentlemen, 110; Ladies, 127 Bryan......

Ladies, 8 Pulaski Township.....

...Gentlemen, 9; Ladies, 9

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