All the Year Round, Volum 27;Volum 47

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Charles Dickens, 1881
 

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Side 281 - And in the morning, rising up a great while before day, he went out and departed into a solitary place, and there prayed.
Side 298 - Suppose, now, one of these engines to be going along a railroad at the rate of nine or ten miles an hour, and that a cow were to stray upon the line and get in the way of the engine ; would not that, think you, be a very awkward circumstance ? "
Side 175 - Almack's, the seventh heaven of the fashionable world. Of the three hundred officers of the Foot Guards, not more than halfa-dozen were honoured with vouchers of admission to this exclusive temple of the beau monde ; the gates of which were guarded by lady patronesses, whose smiles or frowns consigned men and women to happiness or despair.
Side 13 - ... satellites, which revolve about Mars; whereof the innermost is distant from the centre of the primary planet exactly three of his diameters, and the outermost, five; the former revolves in the space of ten hours, and the latter in twenty-one and...
Side 239 - ... had been unnatural, nay, impossible, in Othello's circumstances. The charming passage in the same tragedy, where he tells the manner of winning the affection of his mistress, was urged with so moving and graceful an energy, that, while I walked in the cloisters, I thought of him with the same concern as if I waited for the remains of a person who had in real life done all that I had seen him represent.
Side 155 - I hope with prudence, and not altogether without success, or a sophistical rhetorician, inebriated with the exuberance of his own verbosity, and gifted with an egotistical imagination that can at all times command an interminable and inconsistent series of arguments to malign an opponent and to glorify himself...
Side 306 - Amid the jagged shadows Of mossy leafless boughs, Kneeling in the moonlight, To make her gentle vows ; Her slender palms together prest. Heaving sometimes on her breast ; Her face resigned to bliss or bale — Her face, oh call it fair not pale, And both blue eyes more bright than clear, Each about to have a tear.
Side 465 - The castled crag of Drachenfels Frowns o'er the wide and winding Rhine, Whose breast of waters broadly swells Between the banks which bear the vine, And hills all rich with blossom'd trees, And fields which promise corn and wine, And scatter'd cities crowning these, Whose far white walls along them shine, Have strew'da scene, which I should see With double joy wert thou with me.
Side 153 - To mind the inside of a book is to entertain one's self with the forced product of another man's brain. Now I think a man of quality and breeding may be much amused with the natural sprouts of his own.
Side 157 - As I sat opposite the Treasury Bench the ministers reminded me of one of those marine landscapes not very unusual on the coasts of South America. You behold a range of exhausted volcanoes. Not a flame flickers on a single pallid crest. But the situation is still dangerous. There are occasional earthquakes, and ever and anon the dark rumbling of the sea.

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