Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

DANTE: Translated by Cary, with Copious

Notes, Chronological View, and Prefacc. Portrait of Dante. Post
8vo, limp green cloth gilt, magenta edges, 23. 60.

LIVES OF THE MOST EMINENT ENG-

LISH POETS, with Critical Observations on their Works; to
which are added the PREFACE TO SHAKESPEARE, and the
Review of the " Origin of Evil."

By SAMUEL JOHNSON, LL.D.,

with a Sketch of the Author's Life ;

By SIR WALTER SCOTT.

Crown 8vo, cloth, 3s. 6d.

TINSLEY BROTHERS, 18, Catherine Strcet, Strand.

VALUABLE SECOND-HAND BOOKS Archeo-

ological Journal (Institute), 23 vols, 1778.; Gentleman's Maga-
zinc to 1817, 19: vols. 215; Annual Register to 1835, 79 vols calf, uni-
furm, very good set, £4 148, 611.; "N. &0." complete to June 1867 (two
Indexes), 37 vols. 18 8s.; Owen & Blakeway's Shrewsbury, LARGE
PAPER, £8 188.60,; Dugdale's Warwick, by Thomas, 2 vols. illustrated
with 2 extra Drawing and Author's Autogrnph Letter, 32 guinens;
Surtees & Raine's Durham, L20 108.; Histoire Naturelle des Iles Cana-
ries, 8 vols. impl. 4to, claret morocco, a noble set, £20; Sussex Arche-
ological Collections, 7 vols. (11 to 174508.; Chrysostomi Opera, 13 vols.
folio, best clition, £13; Philonis Opera, best edition, 2 vols. folio, £4 105.;
Ilutching. Dorset, 11 parts, 27 10. See NEW PART of CATALOGUE,

free to any address.-W. GEORGE, Second-hand Bookseller,

23, Bath Street, Bristol.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

AUCTION, at their House, 47, Leicester Square, W.C. on

TUESDAY, January 17, an Ancient and exceedingly valuable PER-
SIAN MANUSCRIPT, containing numerous beantitully tini lieci fui.
page Miniature Drawings, the text profuely adorncul with Mumina-
tions in gold and colours, forming one of the most beautiful secimens
of Eastern Art that has ever occurred for Sale,

Catalogues on receipt of two stamps.

mas -

LONDON, SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 1871.

bably meant the conflict with the various forms

of religious error or heresy in the Church. Arch-
CONTENTS.-No 158.

image then tries his wiles, and separates the
NOTES:- Allegory in the Faerie Queen.” 1.- Letters of knight from Una; but his doing so by making
Nell Gwynne and Kitty Clive, 2. Mons Vultur. 3. - Lon. bim suspect her purity seems rather to break the
don Coffee Houses, be allegat Cornene Placentem P. allegory. However, ne abandons her, and then
Dr. Arbuthnot, 8 - An Inedited Elegy by Oliver Gold-

falls in with Duessa in company with a “faithless
smith - Discrepancies in Dates - The late Sir Samnel
O'Malley, Bart. — Shropshire Sayings – Eirwy Baoluń - Sarazin" named Sansfoy, that is, Paganism, whom
Average of Human Life - French War Songs – Mont he slays; and he is then deceived by Duessa, who
Cenis Tunnel, 9.

conducts him to the House of Pride, that is, the
QUERIES::- Allusion wanted: Henri Panghan - Ameri- Roman Empire, which now becomes Christian.

can "National Song” - Arms of Flemislı Families -
Raph Audley of Sandbach - Bible Illustrations - John Here he encounters and slays a brother of Sansfoy,
Bovey - Cathedral Bells – Cobblers' Lampy in Italy-

named Sansjoy, by which is perhaps meant the
Cookes: Cookesey: Cooke - Cornish spoken in Devon-
Shire - The Dragon Eastern Story - Sir Charles Eger: joyless condition of the Empire when separated
ton, Knight - Equivaleut Foreign Titles — " Le Parceur from the True Church. On his discovering the
du Jour et de la Nuit"- Letter of Galileo - Heraldic -
Herburt of Muckruss - Robert Keck - Laird - Pedigree

real nature of the House of Pride, he seizes the
of Niortimer - Prols, or Mouths of Streans – Privately- earliest opportunity of flight, and abandons it.
printed Books - The Print of “Guidu's Aurora" --The

Una meanwhile wanders alone in search of the
Pronunciation of Greek and Latin, &c., 11.
REPLIES: - The Block Books, 13

champion who had deserted her. She meets with

Parodies, 15 -- The
" Blue-Laws" of Connecticut, 16 – St. Augustin's Ser-

a lion, who becomes her protector. This lion
mons, 17 - A Winter Saying - Robur Caroli - Pear Tree forces an entrance for her into the house of Cor-
- Right to quarter_Arms - Baron Nicholson - - Epigram
on the Walcheren Expedition - Robert de Comya, Earl

ceca and Abessa, and kills Kirkrapine, the para-
of Northumberlaud - Cucumber - Lothing Land -- “ Cer mour of the latter; but is himself slain soon after,
tosino" - A1.cient scottish Deed - Royal Topography defending Una against a Paynim named Sansloy,
Paulet of Amport

a
Swan-Song of Parson Avery - Irish Forfeitures - Patchin who had overcome Archimage, who had rejoined
- The Rochester Hospital - Babies' Bells - Ecstatics — her under the form of the Red-cross Knight. From
Samplers - The Boy-Bishop of the Propaganda for Christ-
Dur or Dour - The Paris Catacombs, &c., 18.

him she is delivered by a band of fawns and
Notes on Books, &c.

satyrs whom her shrieks brought to her aid.

They lead her to their abode in the woods and
Nates.

mountains, where she lives among them and in-

structs them in morals and religion. By the aid
ALLEGORY IN “THE FAERIE QUEEN.

of a knight named Sir Satyrane she leaves them,
Spenser styles his poema continued allegory and sets out again in quest of the Red-cross
or dark conceit”; but he does not by that mean Knight.
to say that it forms one continued allegory in the In this part of the allegory the lion seems to
sense in which we now understand the term. In signify the counts of Toulouse, who protected the
fact there is but one allegory in it-namely, the True Church against that of Rome, and gained its
first book, " The Legend of Holiness"; and in all members admission into the religious houses
the rest of the poem the characters are mere against the will of their inmates, and punished
impersonations of moral or physical qualities, or those who made spoil of sacred things. By the
of real persons, without any specially connected Paynim Sansloy may be meant the papal adherents
series of events. I will here briefly state my con under De Montfort and others, who overcame the
ception of what I regard as the only allegory of counts of Toulouse, and from whom Una is saved
the poem. This, then, take to be the history by the satyrs, that is, the Waldenses, whose
of the Church from its commencement till the abode was in the woods and valleys of Switzer-
poet's own time. In Una I see, not Truth simply, land. Sir Satyrane, who is connected with them,
but the True Church ; in Duessa, not mere False- I take to represent the Iluguenots of France, who
hood, but the False Church-that of Rome. The derived their creed and their name from the
father and mother of Una, the king and queen reformer of Switzerland; and it is very remark-
of Eden, I take to be God the Father and the able that he and Sansloy are left fighting-just
ancient Adamic or patriarchal Church. In the as the Huguenots and the Papists were at the
Dragon I discern the great enemy of man, Satan. time--and are not mentioned any more in this
In the Red-cross Knight the Christian people, book.
represented by St. George, the patron saint of The Red-cross Knight meantime is overtaken
England, the great champion of the true faith; and again seduced by Duessa, and he drinks of a
and finally, in Archimage, Satan in his character fountain, the water of which quite enervates him,
of the tempter and seducer.

and he is then seized and thrown into a loath-
The adventures of the knight begin with his some dungeon by a huge giant, who makes
entering the grove of Error, and his encounter Duessa his lemar, dresses her magnificently, and
ing and slaying that monster. By this is pro- mounts her on a strange beast with seven heads.

Here then we have in this giant Charlemagne The glorious old gossip of Strawberry Hill, in a and his successors, the power and glory of the letter to Lady Ossory of Oct. 23, 1784, furnishes Papacy, and the miserable thraldom of the another account of the incident mentioned in Christian people.

Kitty's letter: Una having learned the fate of her knight, now

" It is very true Madam we are robbed in the face of appeals to Prince Arthur, whom she meets; and the Sun, as well as at the going down thereof. I know he fights and slays the giant, delivers the knight, not how other districts fare, but for five miles round us and strips and exposes Duessa, who flies to hide we are in perpetual jeopardy. Two of our justices, reher shame in the wilderness. Prince Arthur, the turning from a Cabinet Council of their own, at Brentpoet tells us, is Magnificence, i. e. the doing of ford, were robbed last week before three o'clock, at the great deeds. He is the impersonation of British hoodwinked, like their Alma Mater herself, and, conseroyalty as shown forth in the house of Tudor, quently as they cannot see, it is not surprising that both and we have here the victory of that house over she and they should often weigh out their goods with the papacy and its abetturs.

unequal scales.” In order to restore her knight to the vigour Can you or any of your readers tell me who requisite for his conflict with the dragon, Una Mrs. Hart was, and the "old Weasel which she now leads him to the House of Holiness, where left behind "?

WILLIAM TITE. he is put through a course of instruction and 43, Lowndes Square. discipline by Faith, Hope, and Charity, the daughters of Holiness. He then engages the dragon, pray Deare Mr. Hide ' forgive me for not writewhom he overcomes and slays after a perilous ing to you before now for the reasone is I have conflict of three days' duration. At the end of bin sick thre months & sinse I recoverd I have the first day, when the hero's strength is nearly had nothing to intertaine you withall nor have exhausted, it is restored by his falling into the nothing now worth writing but that I can holde Well of Life; and at the end of the second day no longer to let you know I never have ben in he is again saved by falling into the "stream of any companie wethout drinking your health for balnı” that flowed from the Tree of Life. By I loue you with all my soule. the pel mel is now the well and tree I think the two sacraments to me a dismale plase sinse I have uterly lost Si seem to be indicated. The remainder of the Car Scrope ? never to be recourd agane for he tould allegory is simple and easy to be understood. me, he could not live allwayes at this rate & so

I will only further observe, that the allegorical begune to be a littel uncivil, which I could not characters cease with this book. So when we sufer from an uglye baux garscon. M. Knights meet with the Red-cross Knight and Satyrane Lady mothers dead & she has put up'a scutchin no again, they are simply knights of Faerie, Archi- beiger then my Lady grins + scunchis.a My lord mage a mere enchanter, and Duessa the Queen of Scots.

Thos, KEIGHTLEY. 1 Mr. Hide is conjectured to have been the handsome

Lory or Lawrence Hyde, second son of Lord Chancellor
Clarendon, created Earl of Rochester in 1682. In May

and June 1678 he was at the Hague on diplomatic busiLETTERS OF NELL GWYNNE AND KITTY

ness. (Correspondence of Clarendon and Rochester, i. CLIVE.

16, 20.) DEAR MR. EDITOR

2 Sir Carr Scrope was created a baronet 1667-8, and

died unmarried 1680. He was one of the witty comIn your interesting Miscellany you have re

panions of Charles II., and author of various poetical cently introduced two letters from Nell Gwynne. effusions, to be found in Dryden's Miscellanies. Johnson I think it might please your readers to have a notices him in his life of Rochester. copy of her letter which is in my collection of 3 Mrs. Knight, a singer of great celebrity, and a rival

to Nell Gwynne in the tender regard of Charles II. She autographs. It is, no doubt, authentic, and was

is mentioned by both Evelyn and Pepys, although the formerly in the possession of Mr. Singer, at whose latter had not heard her sing up to the period at which sale I bought it. It was so well illustrated by his diary closes. The name of her Lady-mother has not our dear mutual friend Mr. Bruce, and introduced been found. by him, with some others, into the Camden Mis 4 Lady Greene, who escaped the researches of MR. cellany (vol. v.), that I add to it his valuable

notes. (“N. & Q." 3rd

S. vii. 413). She was another favourite

BRUCE, has been identified by Mr. J. G. Nichols I also enclose another curious specimen, written of Charles II., by whom she was the mother of his son by the famous Kitty Clive, addressed no doubt Charles Fitz-Charles, created in 1675 Earl of Plymouth, to her friend Miss Pope the actress, of whom and of a daughter Katherine. Lady Greene was KaHorace Walpole, writing to the Countess of therine, daughter of Thomas Pegge, Esq. of Yeldersley, Ossory on July 15, 1783, says:

co. Derby ; became the wife of Sir Edward Greene, Bart.

of Sampford in Essex, who died in Flanders in 1676. “Miss Pope has been at Mrs. Clive's this week, and I Lady Greene herself had probably died shortly before this have not been able to call on them. I wrote a line of letter was written.-En. “ N. & Q.”. excuse, but hoped very soon to salute Miss Pope's eye. 4a Probably the writer misplaced the n in this word, Excuse my radotage, but what better can you expect ?" writing scunchis for scuchins.

suppose the

age of 34.

Rochester" is gon in the cuntrei. Mi Savilo has now lets talke of state affairs, for we never caried got a misfortune, but is upon recovery & is to things so cunningly as now for we dont know mary an hairres, who I thinke wont wont [sic] whether we shall have pesce or war, but I am for have an ill time ont if he holds up his thumb. war and for no other reason but that you may My lord of Dorscit ? apiers wonse in thre munthe, come home. I have a thousand merry conseets, for he drinkes aile with Shadwell & MHaris • but I cant make her write um & therfore you at the Dukes house all day long. my Lord Bur- must take the will for the deed. god bye. your ford 10 remimbers his sarvis to you. my Lord most loueing obedunt faithfull & humbel Bauclaire 11 is is [sic] goeing into france. we are a

sarvant goeing to supe with the king at whithall & my lady

E. G. Harvie. the King remembers his sarvis to you. John Wilmot, the poetical Earl of Rochester, who, as

Twickenham Oct' ye 17, 1784. Johnson remarked, “ blazed out his youth and his health My dear Popy, ia lavish voluptuousness," and with “avowed contempt The Jack I must have, and I of all decency and order." The history of the contrast Cook will be as much delighted with it, as a fine presented by the close of his life is a well-known book by Lady with a Birthday Suit; I send You WallBishop Burnet. He died on the 26th July, 1680, at the

nuts which are fine, but pray be moderate in your The gentleman who could govern by rule of thumb admiration for they are dangerous Dainties; John was Henry Savile, the future Vice-Chamberlain, for whom has carried about to my Neighbours abovo six see the Savile Correspondence, edited by Mr. W. D. Cooper thousand and he tells me there (are] as many still for the Camden Society in 1858. The projected marriage left; indeed it is a most wonderfull tree M". did not come off. 7 The Earl of Dorset was one of the wildest of the mad

Prince has been robd at Two o'Clock at Noon of companions of the merry monarch. His doings are

her Gold Watch and four Guineas, and at the written at large in all the scandalous chronicles of that same time our two Justices of three and sixpence period. Nell Gwynne was living with him as his mis

a Piece, they had like to be shott for not having tress when the king took a fancy to her, and the terms of the bargain and sale by which she was transferred to

more. Every body inquires after You and I dethe sovereign may be read in Cunningham, p. 68. Dorset | liver your Comp'. Poor Mr Hart is dead - well or Buckhurst, for the latter was his title whilst Nell spoken of by every body. I pity the poor old Gwynne lived with him, is more creditably known by his Weassel that is left behind. song " To all you ladies now at land," and by his con

Adieu my dear Popy duct at the close of the reign of James II. His life is included among Johnson's Lives of the Poets. & Thomas Shadwell the poet, who owed to the influence

C. CLIVE. of the Earl of Dorset his appointment as laureate on the The Jack must carry six or seven and twenty ejection of Dryden at the Revolution of 1688. However pounds, the waterman shall bring the money when mean his poetry, his conversation is said to have been

I know what. higlily witty and amusing. From his companionship with Rochester and Dorset, it is not to be wondered at that it was also often indecent and profane.

MONS VULTUR. • Joseph Harris, the celebrated actor, who drew sword

I do not know that I have much that is new to for Charles I. at Edgehill, and lived to delight the town, after the Restoration, with his Othello, Alexander, Brutus, say respecting Mons Vultur; but it is so seldom. and Catiline. Pepys describes him as a man of most at that a traveller penetrates to this secluded part of tractive qualities." I do find him a very excellent per- Italy, that anything, however trifling, will beson, such as in my whole acquaintance I do not know interesting to some of your readers, particularly to another better qualified for converse, whether in things the admirers of Horace and his works. It was a: of his own trade or of other kind; a man of great understanding and observation, and very agreeable in the

little beyond the middle of June that I mounted manner of his discourse, and civil as far as is possible. i this beautiful mountain, clothed with oaks, elme; was mightily pleased with his company.” Lord Braybrooke stated in a note to Pepys (ii. 196) that Harris Lord Montagu of Boughton, afterwards Earl and Duke of probably died or left the stage about 1676. The present Manchester. Elizabeth married Sir Daniel Harvey, a letter postpones that date for a year or two, and Dr. Doran conspicuous person at that time; as ranger of Richmond in his most amusing treasury of information respecting Park he gave shelter in his house to Lady Castlemaine: the drama (Their Majesties Šervants, vol. i. p. 63), dates during her quarrels with Charles II. Her ladyship, achis retirement from the stage in 1682, and his interment cording to Pepys, rewarded Lady Harvey by encouragat Stanmore Magna in 1683.

ing “Doll Common," or Mrs. Cory, who was the distin10 Lord Burford, as we have already noticed, was the guished representative of that character, to mimic Lady elder of Nell Gwynne's two children by the king. He Harvey on the stage, in the character of Sempronia. was born 8th May, 1670, created Lord Burford on the Lady Harvey “provided people to hiss her and fling 27th December, 1676, and Duke of St. Alban's on the 10th oranges at her," and, that being unsuccessful, procured Jan. 1683-4.

the Lord Chamberlain to imprison her. Lady Castle11 Lord Beauclerk, Nell Gwynne's younger son, was

maine “ made the king to release her," and a great disborn 25th December, 1671, and died, as we have before turbance was excited both in the theatre and at court. remarked, at Paris in September, 1680.

In the mean time Sir Daniel Harvey was sent away am12 Lady Harvey was Elizabeth, sister of Ralph third bassador to Constantinople.

Y" ever

Here then we have in this giant Charlemagne The glorious old gossip of Strawberry Hill, in a
and his successors, the power and glory of the letter to Lady Ossory of Oct. 23, 1784, furnishes
Papacy, and the miserable thraldom of the another account of the incident mentioned in
Christian people.

Kitty's letter:-
Una having learned the fate of her knight, now

" It is rery true Madam we are robbed in the face of appeals to Prince Arthur, whom she meets; and the Sun, as well as at the going down thereof. I know he fights and slays the giant, delivers the knight, not how other districts fare, but for fire miles round us and strips and exposes Duessa, who flies to hide we are in perpetual jeopardy.. Two of our justices, reher shame in the wilderness. Prince Arthur, the turning from a Cabinet Council of their own, at Brentpoet tells us, is Magnificence, i. e. the doing of ford, were robbed last week before three o'clock, at the great deeds. He is the impersonation of British hoodwinked, like their Alma Mater herself

, and, conseroyalty as shown forth in the house of Tudor, quently as they cannot see, it is not surprising that both and we have here the victory of that house over she and they should often weigh out their goods with the papacy and its abetturs.

unequal scales.” In order to restore her knight to the vigour Can you or any of your readers tell me who requisite for his conflict with the dragon, Una Mrs. Hart was, and the "old Weasel which she now leads him to the House of Holiness, where left behind "?

WILLIAM TITE. he is put through a course of instruction and 43, Lowndes Square. discipline by Faith, Hope, and Charity, the daughters of Holiness. He then engages the dragon, pray Deare Mr. Hide 1 forgive me for not writewhom he overcomes and slays after a perilous ing to you before now for the reasone is I have conflict of three days' duration. At the end of bin sick thre months & sinse I recoverd I have the first day, when the hero's strength is nearly had nothing to intertaine you withall nor have exbausted, it is restored by his falling into the nothing now worth writing but that I can holde Well of Life; and at the end of the second day no longer to let you know I never have ben in he is again saved by falling into the "stream of any companie wethout drinking your health for balm" that flowed from the Tree of Life. By I loue you with all my soule. the pel mel is now the well and tree I think the two sacraments to me a dismale plase sinse. I have uterly lost Sr seem to be indicated. The remainder of the Car Scrope ? never to be recourd agane for he tould allegory is simple and easy to be understood. me, he could not live allwayes at this rate & so

I will only further observe, that the allegorical begune to be a littel uncivil, which I could not characters cease with this book. So when we sufer from an uglye baux garscon. N. Knights meet with the Red-cross Knight and Satyrane Lady mothers dead & she has put up'a scutchin no again, they are simply knights of Faerie, Archi- beiger then my Lady grins* scunchis.a My lord mage a mere enchanter, and Duessa thé Queen of Scots.

Tuos, KEIGHTLEY.

1 Mr. Hide is conjectured to have been the handsome Lory or Lawrence Hyde, second son of Lord Chancellor Clarendon, created Earl of Rochester in 1682. In May

and June 1678 he was at the Hague on diplomatic busiLETTERS OF NELL GWYNNE AND KITTY

ness. (Correspondence of Clarendon and Rochester, i. CLIVE.

16, 20.) DEAR MR. EDITOR

2 Sir Carr Scrope was created a baronet 1667-8, and

died unmarried 1680. He was one of the witty comIn your interesting Miscellany you have re

panions of Charles II., and author of various poetical cently

introduced two letters from Nell Gwynne. effusions, to be found in Dryden's Miscellanies. Johnson I think it might please your readers to have a notices him in his life of Rochester. copy of her letter which is in my collection of

3 Mrs. Knight, a singer of great celebrity, and a rival

to Nell Gwynne in the tender regard of Charles II. She autographs. It is, no doubt, authentic, and was

is mentioned by both Evelyn and Pepys, although the formerly in the possession of Mr. Singer, at whose latter had not heard her sing up to the period at which sale I bought it. It was so well illustrated by his diary closes. The name of her Lady-mother has not our dear mutual friend Mr. Bruce, and introduced been found. by liim, with some others, into the Camden Mis 4 Lady Greene, who escaped the rescarches of MR. cellany (vol. v.), that I add to it his valuable notes. (“N. & Q." 3rd S. viii. 413). She was another favourite

Bruce, has been identified by Mr. J. G. NICHOLS I also enclose another curious specimen, written of Charles 11., by whom she was the mother of his son by the famous Kitty Clive, addressed no doubt Charles Fitz Charles, created in 1675 Earl of Plymouth, to her friend Miss Pope the actress, of whom and of a daughter Katherine. Lady Greene was KaIlorace Walpole, writing

the Countess of therine, daughter of Thomas Pegge, Esq. of Yeldersley, Ossory on July 15, 1783, says:

co. Derby ; became the wife of Sir Edward Greene, Bart.

of Sampford in Essex, who died in Flanders in 1676. “ Miss Pope has been at Mrs. Clive's this week, and I Lady Greene herself had probably died shortly before this have not been able to call on them. I wrote a line of letter was written.-En. “ N. & Q.” excuse, but hoped very soon to salute Miss Pope's eye. 4a Probably the writer misplaced the n in this word, Excuse my radotage, but what better can you expect ?" writing scunchis for scuchins.

2

« ForrigeFortsett »