A Memoir of Thomas Chittenden: The First Governor of Vermont; with a History of the Constitution During His Administration

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author, 1849 - 222 sider
 

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Side 27 - That government is, or ought to be, instituted for the common benefit, protection, and security of the people, nation, or community; of all the various modes and forms of government, that is best which is capable of producing the greatest degree of happiness and safety, and is most effectually secured against the danger of...
Side 74 - That all power is inherent in the people, and all free governments are founded on their authority and instituted for their peace, safety and happiness.
Side 152 - That in controversies respecting property, and in suits between man and man, the ancient trial by jury is preferable to any other, and ought to be held sacred.
Side 27 - ... on account of his religious sentiments or peculiar mode of religious worship...
Side 30 - That the people have a right to bear arms for the defence of themselves and the state; and, as standing armies in time of peace are dangerous to liberty, they ought not to be kept up; and that the military should be kept under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.
Side 45 - A school or schools shall be established in each county by the legislature for the convenient instruction of youth, with such salaries to the masters paid by the public as may enable them to instruct youth at low prices: And all useful learning shall be duly encouraged and promoted in one or more universities.
Side 45 - Every person of good character, who comes to settle in this state, having first taken an oath or affirmation of allegiance to the same, may purchase, or by other just means acquire, hold and transfer land, or other real estate, and after one year's residence shall be deemed a free denizen thereof, and entitled to all...
Side 41 - The person of a debtor, where there is not a strong presumption of fraud, shall not be continued in prison, after delivering up „bona fide" all his estate real and personal for the use of his creditors, in such manner as shall be hereafter regulated by law. All prisoners shall be bailable by sufficient sureties, unless for capital offences, when the proof is evident or presumption great.
Side 28 - That every member of society hath a right to be protected in the enjoyment of life, liberty, and property, and therefore, is bound to contribute his proportion towards the expense of that protection, and yield his personal service, when necessary, or an equivalent thereto...
Side 26 - That all men are born equally free and independent, and have certain natural, inherent and unalienablc rights, among which are, the enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.

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