Robinson's Magazine: A Weekly Repository of Original Papers and Selections from English Magazines, Volum 1

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Joseph Robinson, 1818
 

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Side 157 - Chancellor held on his course towards that unknown part of the world, and sailed so far that he came at last to the place where he found no night at all, but a continual light and brightness of the sun shining clearly upon the huge and mighty sea.
Side 90 - Tis reason a man that will have a wife should be at the charge of her trinkets, and pay all the scores she sets on him. He that will keep a monkey, 'tis fit he should pay for the glasses he breaks.
Side 30 - I love the language, that soft bastard Latin, Which melts like kisses from a female mouth, And sounds as if it should be writ on satin, With syllables which breathe of the sweet South, And gentle liquids gliding all so pat in, That not a single accent seems uncouth, Like our harsh northern whistling, grunting guttural, Which we're obliged to hiss, and spit, and sputter all.
Side 29 - And up and down the long canals they go, And under the Rialto shoot along, By night and day, all paces, swift or slow, And round the theatres, a sable throng, They wait in their dusk livery of woe, But not to them do...
Side 93 - THOUGH some make slight of libels, yet you may see by them how the wind sits : as take a straw and throw it up into the air, you shall see by that which way the wind is, which you shall not do by casting up a stone. More solid things do not show the complexion of the times so well as ballads and libels.
Side 320 - Twas a skull Once of ethereal spirit full. This narrow cell was Life's retreat: This space was Thought's mysterious seat. What beauteous visions filled this spot! What dreams of pleasure long forgot! Nor hope, nor joy, nor love, nor fear Have left one trace of record here. Beneath this moldering canopy Once shone the bright and busy eye; But start not at the dismal void.
Side 320 - Can little now avail to them. But if the page of truth they sought, Or comfort to the mourner brought, These hands a richer...
Side 213 - I fell into the gloom to which from my infancy I had been occasionally subject. I had a family for whom I had no dinner, and a landlady for whom I had no rent. I had gone abroad in despondence — I returned home almost in desperation.
Side 320 - But start not at the dismal void: If social love that eye employed...
Side 272 - Then said the Rose, with deepened glow, " On me another grace bestow ;" The spirit paused in silent thought, — What grace was there that flower had not...

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