Chaucerian Tragedy

Forside
DS Brewer, 2000 - 297 sider
This book is concerned with the medieval idea of what constituted tragedy; it suggests that it was not a common term, and that those few who used the term did not always intend the same thing by it. Kelly believes that it was Chaucer's work which shaped notions of the genre, and places his achievement in critical and historical context. He begins by contrasting modern with medieval theoretical approaches to genres, then discusses Boccaccio's concept of tragedy before turning to Chaucer himself, exploring the ideas of tragedy prevalent in medieval England and their influence on Chaucer, and showing how Chaucer interpreted the term. Troilus and Criseyde is analysed specifically as a tragedy, with an account of its reception in modern times; for comparison, there is an analysis of how John Lydgate and Robert Henryson, two of Chaucer's imitators, understood and practiced tragedy.
Professor HENRY ANSGAR KELLY teaches at UCLA.
 

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Innhold

Boccaccios nontragedies
11
Chaucer on tragedy
39
The tragedy of Troilus
92
Lydgate on tragedy
149
Lydgates fallen princes
176
Henrysons tragedy of Cresseid
216
Conclusion
260
Index
285
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