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'A brother beloved, specially to me, but how much more

unto thee, both in the flesh, and in the Lord.'-
PHILEMON, ver. 16.

R. BONAR has kindly furnished me with

the notes of the address which he de-
livered when announcing to his con-

gregation the tidings of Mr. Nisbet's sudden and unexpected death. They are as fol

D

lows :

* Nov. 12, 1854.–I cannot close this day's services without making special mention of one whose name is intimately connected with this town, and still more intimately connected with this church in which we worship. On Wednesday last, and in the presence of his family, he was suddenly called away from earth, and ushered into the presence of the Lord.

'It was in July 1837 that I first became acquainted with Mr. Nisbet, when he entered into a correspondence with me as to my becoming minister of this church, then in the process of erection, in a great measure through his liberality and zeal. Since then our acquaintanceship was continued, and our friendship remained unbroken to the last. For myself I can say, that though there might be differences of opinion between us, as between all friends, there never was any shadow of alteration in the steady warmth of his attachment, or in the expressions of his deep interest in all things connected with this congregation.

• He was a man, and had of course his imperfections. But there were so many things truly loveable about him, that in your intercourse with him you felt the bonds of Christian sympathy and brotherhood drawn more and more closely between him and you. You felt the value of his friendship ; you enjoyed the easy flow of his conversation ; you gave your confidence to his openheartedness and frank simplicity; you were profited by the suggestions of his shrewd and manifold experience ; you were refreshed by the heartiness of his Christian cheerfulness ; you were softened, as well as won, by the tenderness of his spirit—a tenderness of spirit which never failed to fill his eyes with tears at the simplest narrative of a conversion, or at the mere mention of good news concerning any revival of the work of God either at home or abroad.

• 1. He loved his Bible and his Saviour. A verse from that book, and the mere mention of the name of his Lord, would touch and soften him at any time, and in the midst of any business, however uncongenial.

• 2. He loved the Sabbath day. He prized it as a day of rest ; he enjoyed it as a day of fellowship with God, and isolation from the world. Carrying with him to London the good old Scottish ideas of our fathers as to the sacredness of that day, he gave his testimony on every hand, both by word and deed, to the blessedness of observing it, as once, at least, it was observed in Scotland.

3. He was a lover of hospitality. He gave himself to the ministry of the saints. He was the Gaius of the church in our southern metropolis, and his house was ever at the service of any of Christ's servants, or indeed of any one who stood in need of it. He threw his door open to all.

4. He was a lover of good men. Much he could tell you of the past, and of the worthies of other days with whom he had held intercourse. There were few of the eminent Christians, for the last forty years at least, of whom he could not speak from personal knowledge. He delighted to give the hand of brotherhood to every Christian, and many

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of their words and deeds did he treasure up and dwell upon.

His house was the centre of a large portion of the vital Christianity of the last forty years in London.

5. He was a strong and decided Presbyterian. Though meeting continually with men of other denominations, he never let go his old principles, but held them unbroken and unaltered to the last. Of the Presbyterian form of government he had known the benefit, and he gave his testimony in favour of it wherever he was.

.6. He was generous in his gifts for the cause of Christ. We knew his liberality here; and in London there were few Christian or charitable institutions that did not share it. He gave freely, as the Lord had given to him.

* Friends and brethren, be followers of these forerunners in the heavenly race. Follow them, as they followed Christ. Press forward more fervently. The time is short. The days are evil. The godly man ceaseth. The righteous are taken away from the evil to come. Awake, and sleep no more. Arise, and loiter no more.

Work while it is day, for the night cometh when no man can work.'

Sow ye

beside all waters,
Where the dew of heaven may fall ;
Ye shall reap, if ye

be not weary,
For the Spirit breathes over all.

good news concerning any revival of the work of God either at home or abroad.

"1. He loved his Bible and his Saviour. A verse from that book, and the mere mention of the name of his Lord, would touch and soften him at any time, and in the midst of any business, however uncongenial.

62. He loved the Sabbath day. He prized it as a day of rest ; he enjoyed it as a day of fellowship with God, and isolation from the world. Carrying with him to London the good old Scottish ideas of our fathers as to the sacredness of that day, he gave his testimony on every hand, both by word and deed, to the blessedness of observing it, as once, at least, it was observed in Scotland.

* 3. He was a lover of hospitality. He gave himself to the ministry of the saints. He was the Gaius of the church in our southern metropolis, and his house was ever at the service of

any

of Christ's servants, or indeed of any one who stood in need of it. He threw his door open to all.

4. He was a lover of good men. Much he could tell you of the past, and of the worthies of other days with whom he had held intercourse. There were few of the eminent Christians, for the last forty years at least, of whom he could not speak from personal knowledge. He delighted to give the hand of brotherhood to every Christian, and many

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