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£1, Is. ; share of Dinner for Sabbath School Children, £1, Is. 9d. ; subscription for Mrs. Helm, Ios. 6d. ; Wine and Jelly for little Mary Morguant, 5s. ; Kelso Friendly Society, £ 1, IIS.; bottle of wine for Mrs. Mott, being ill, 4s. ; subscription for Cleveland School Building Fund, £2, 3s. 6d. ; Missionary collection, 7s. 6d.; Tabernacle Society, 125.

I have been somewhat particular in recording these various items, because of the lesson which they teach. Should they fall under the notice of any young man, little known, of limited means, just setting out on the business of life, they may be instrumental in dislodging a false principle from his heart. Hitherto, perhaps, he has been led to argue in this way: 'If I had influence and wealth at my disposal, I certainly might do something for the cause of Christ, and for the benefit of my fellow-men. But I have no position

I in the world at present, and in the meantime there is really nothing which I am able to do.'

Such an argument was never used by James Nisbet. He did not wait till he was wealthy before he became charitable. Even when his income was most scanty he never got into debt, and he had always something to give away. The amount might not be very great in itself; but, after providing for lodgings and personal expenses, and exercising both economy and selfdenial, it may be said that, in the form of charity, he really gave what he could. And the point which of the vessel which conveyed him to London, there being in those days no daily trains by rail.

For the purpose of meeting current expenses, he was obliged to dispose of his violin, of which, having a fine taste for music, he was inordinately fond. And when, on his arrival at the great metropolis, he engaged himself as clerk to Mr. Hugh Usher, a West India merchant in Moorfields, his salary amounted only to £ 54, 12s. per annum ; and though, for his good conduct, it was eventually raised to £60, and from £ 60 to £70, and from £70 to £ 100, and from £100 to £120, yet even when his income was most limited, he did not spend the whole of it on himself. During the first year of his engagement, he incurred

, an expense of upwards of £17, by enrolling himself in the Volunteer Corps of Loyal North Britons. And in a subsequent year or two, he sent £15 to his father ; £6, with Brown's Family Bible, to his mother ; two guineas to his aunt ; and two guineas to his cousin ; whilst the following may be noted amongst his early charities : Society for Propagating Christian Knowledge, los. 6d. ; subscription to the Friend-in-Need Society, 4s. ; Missionary collection at the Tabernacle, 55. ; donation to the Deaf and Dumb Asylum, 78.; annual subscription for Swallow Street School, Ios. 6d.; British and Foreign Bible Society, ios. 6d. ; Tottenham Court School, Ios. 6d. ; subscription for aged Widow and Daughter,

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£1, Is. ; share of Dinner for Sabbath School Children, £ 1, Is. 9d. ; subscription for Mrs. Helm, 1os. 6d. ; Wine and Jelly for little Mary Morguant, 5s. ; Kelso Friendly Society, £ 1, IIS.; bottle of wine for Mrs. Mott, being ill, 4s. ; subscription for Cleveland School Building Fund, £2, 3s. 6d. ; Missionary collection, 75. 6d.; Tabernacle Society, 12s.

I have been somewhat particular in recording these various items, because of the lesson which they teach. Should they fall under the notice of any young man, little known, of limited means, just setting out on the business of life, they may be instrumental in dislodging a false principle from his heart. Hitherto, perhaps, he has been led to argue in this way: 'If I had influence and wealth at my disposal, I certainly might do something for the cause of Christ, and for the benefit of my fellow-men. But I have no position in the world at present, and in the meantime there is really nothing which I am able to do.'

Such an argument was never used by James Nisbet. He did not wait till he was wealthy before he became charitable. Even when his income was most scanty he never got into debt, and he had always something to give away. The amount might not be very great in itself; but, after providing for lodgings and personal expenses, and exercising both economy and selfdenial, it may be said that, in the form of charity, he really gave what he could. And the point which of the vessel which conveyed him to London, there being in those days no daily trains by rail. For the purpose of meeting current expenses, he was obliged to dispose of his violin, of which, having a fine taste for music, he was inordinately fond. And when, on his arrival at the great metropolis, he engaged himself as clerk to Mr. Hugh Usher, a West India merchant in Moorfields, his salary amounted only to £ 54, 12s. per annum ; and though, for his good conduct, it was eventually raised to £60, and from £ 60 to £70, and from £ 70 to £ 100, and from £ 100 to £ 120, yet even when his income was most limited, he did not spend the whole of it on himself. During the first year of his engagement, he incurred an expense of upwards of £ 17, by enrolling himself in the Volunteer Corps of Loyal North Britons. And in a subsequent year or two, he sent £15 to his father ; £6, with Brown's Family Bible, to his mother ; two guineas to his aunt ; and two guineas

· to his cousin ; whilst the following may be noted amongst his early charities : Society for Propagating Christian Knowledge, ios. 6d. ; subscription to the Friend-in-Need Society, 4s. ; Missionary collection at the Tabernacle, 55. ; donation to the Deaf and Dumb Asylum, 78. ; annual subscription for Swallow Street School, Ios. 6d.; British and Foreign Bible Society, ios. 6d. ; Tottenham Court School, Ios. 6d. ; subscription for aged Widow and Daughter,

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£1, Is. ; share of Dinner for Sabbath School Children, £1, Is. 9d. ; subscription for Mrs. Helm, 1os. 6d. ; Wine and Jelly for little Mary Morguant, 5s. ; Kelso Friendly Society, £ 1, IIS.; bottle of wine for Mrs. Mott, being ill, 4s. ; subscription for Cleveland School Building Fund, £2, 3s. 6d. ; Missionary collection, 75. 60.; Tabernacle Society, 125.

I have been somewhat particular in recording these various items, because of the lesson which they teach. Should they fall under the notice of any young man, little known, of limited means, just setting out on the business of life, they may be instrumental in dislodging a false principle from his heart. Hitherto, perhaps, he has been led to argue in this way: 'If I

, had influence and wealth at my disposal, I certainly might do something for the cause of Christ, and for the benefit of my fellow-men. But I have no position in the world at present, and in the meantime there is really nothing which I am able to do.'

Such an argument was never used by James Nisbet. He did not wait till he was wealthy before he became charitable. Even when his income was most scanty he never got into debt, and he had always something to give away. The amount might not be very great in itself ; but, after providing for lodgings and personal expenses, and exercising both economy and selfdenial, it may be said that, in the form of charity, he really gave what he could. And the point which

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