The Harleian Miscellany: Or, A Collection of Scarce, Curious, and Entertaining Pamphlets and Tracts, as Well in Manuscript as in Print, Found in the Late Earl of Oxford's Library ; Interspersed with Historical, Political, and Critical Notes, Volum 2

Forside
William Oldys, John Malham
R. Dutton, 1809
 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Utvalgte sider

Innhold

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 10 - King William and Queen Mary, intituled, An Act declaring the Rights and Liberties of the Subject, and settling the succession of the Crown.
Side 130 - The place of the Scripture which he read was this : He was led as a sheep to the slaughter ; and like a lamb dumb before his shearer, so opened he not his mouth : In his humiliation his judgment was taken away and who shall declare his generation? for his life is taken from the earth.
Side 520 - Know ye not that a little leaven leaveneth the whole lump? ^Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us: ^Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness; but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.
Side 257 - I heard say, when he attempted his last invasion, some upon the seacoast forsook their towns, and flew up higher into the country, and left all naked and exposed to his entrance. But I swear unto you by God, if I knew those persons, or any that shall do so hereafter, I will make them know and feel what it is to be so fearful in so urgent a cause.
Side 105 - ... dominions of others, but a just defence of herself; not the shedding of Christian blood, but the saving of poor afflicted souls. Come down therefore, come down, and deliver thy people by her. To vanquish is all one with thee, by few or by many, by want or by wealth, by weakness or by strength.
Side 343 - ... sake to discharge the duty that God hath laid upon me, and to maintain his glory, and keep you in safety, in mine own disposition I should be willing to resign the place I hold to any other, and glad to be freed of the glory with the...
Side 484 - Nor doth the silver-tongued Melicert Drop from his honied Muse one sable tear, To mourn her death that graced his desert, And to his lays open'd her royal ear. Shepherd, remember our Elizabeth, And sing her Rape, done by that Tarquin death.
Side 342 - ... love unto us. The zeal of which affection, tending to ease my people and knit their hearts unto me, I embrace with a princely care, for above all earthly treasure I esteem my people's love, more than which I desire not to merit.
Side 274 - Highn"ss's subjects ; a more lively proof •whereof one could never see than in the poor Don Antonio, who, when he was here, was as much at mass, as any man living, yet there did not so much as one papist in England give him any good countenance; so factious an affection is borne to the Spaniards.
Side 258 - ... to have so much always lying in her coffers, for your defence in time of need, and not to be driven to get it, when we should use it. You that be lieutenants and gentlemen of command...

Bibliografisk informasjon