May You Like it

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T. Boys, 1822 - 272 sider

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Innhold

Del 1
28
Del 2
29
Del 3
65
Del 4
100
Del 5
101
Del 6
134
Del 7
135
Del 8
173
Del 9
183
Del 10
189
Del 11
201
Del 12
207
Del 13
242
Del 14
254
Del 15
260

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Populære avsnitt

Side 229 - O spare me a little, that I may recover my strength : before I go hence, and be no more seen.
Side 154 - Lie not ; but let thy heart be true to God, Thy mouth to it, thy actions to them both. Cowards tell lies, and those that fear the rod; The stormy working soul spits lies and froth. Dare to be true. Nothing can need a lie. A fault, which needs it most, grows two thereby.
Side 109 - Because thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing; and knowest not that thou art wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked...
Side 207 - Athenian walls from ruin bare. IX. TO A VIRTUOUS YOUNG LADY. LADY, that in the prime of earliest youth Wisely hast shunned the broad way and the green, And with those few art eminently seen, That labour up the hill of heavenly truth, The better part with Mary and with Ruth Chosen thou hast ; and they that overween, And at thy growing virtues fret their spleen, No anger find in thee, but pity and ruth.
Side 97 - Philip findeth Nathanael, and saith unto him, We have found him of whom Moses in the law and the prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph.
Side 64 - Now, there was about this time Jesus, a wise man, if it be lawful to call him a man, for he was a doer of wonderful works, a teacher of such men as receive the truth with pleasure. He drew over to him both many of the Jews, and many of the Gentiles. He was the Christ...
Side x - Here the self-torturing sophist, wild Rousseau, The apostle of affliction, he who thre,w Enchantment over passion, and from woe Wrung overwhelming eloquence, first drew The breath which made him wretched : yet he knew How to make madness beautiful, and cast O'er erring deeds and thoughts a heavenly hue Of words, like sunbeams, dazzling as they past The eyes, which o'er them shed tears feelingly and fast.
Side 193 - Yet thou sayest, Because I am innocent, surely his anger shall turn from me. Behold, I will plead with thee, because thou sayest, I have not sinned.
Side 122 - So spake the seraph Abdiel, faithful found, Among the faithless faithful only he; Among innumerable false unmoved, Unshaken, unseduced, unterrified, His loyalty he kept, his love, his zeal ; Nor number nor example with him wrought To swerve from truth, or change his constant mind, Though single.
Side 28 - Stern Lawgiver! yet thou dost wear The Godhead's most benignant grace; Nor know we anything so fair As is the smile upon thy face: Flowers laugh before thee on their beds And fragrance in thy footing treads; Thou dost preserve the stars from wrong; And the most ancient heavens, through thee, Are fresh and strong.

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