History of the Indian Mutiny, 1857-1858: Commencing from the Close of the Second Volume of Sir John Kaye's History of the Sepoy War, Volum 1

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W.H. Allen and Company, 1878
 

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Innhold

Escape of the English
332
Doubtful behaviour of the sepoys there
336
The garrison are forced to take to boats
342
BOOK IX
348
The one chance of averting danger
354
The 7th Oudh Irregulars mutiny
363
The ladies and children are brought within the Resi
369
The position improved by the suppression of the out
376
Malaon and Mr Capper
382
The fugitives from Sitapur
388
Mutiny at Faizabad
392
Mr Wingfield and others are received by the Raja
394
Many of the English leave in boats
400
Murder of Colonel Fisher and others
406
Illness of Sir Henry Lawrence and its consequences
412
Presence of mind and daring of Captain Gould Weston
418
Battle of Chinhat
427
Proceedings after Chinhat
433
The debt of England to Sir Henry Lawrence
441
Proceedings of the garrison
447
The three weeks following the first grand assault
453
The Kanhpur battery
459
Reasons of the author for dwelling specially on the four
462
Events following the third grand assault
469
Angad brings tidings of Havelocks certain approach
475
Captain Wilson
481
The ladies
487
BrigadierGeneral Neill arrives at Kanhpur
489
He attacks and defeats him there
495
Havelock having been reinforced again advances
503
Havelocks action again considered and vindicated
510
Reflections on the policy adopted by the Government
512
Neill is appointed to command the right wing of
518
The orders on the subject expressed by Sir Colin Camp
525
The temper of the men
531
Havelock changes his position and halts the next day
535
The rearguard enters on the morning of the 27th
541
APPENDIX A
547
APPENDIX B
556

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Side 575 - ... indifferently fed and worse housed. They were exposed — especially the 13th Regiment — under the gallant Lieutenant Aitken, to a most galling fire of round shot and musketry, which materially decreased their numbers. They were so near the enemy that conversation could be carried on between them ; and every effort, persuasion, promise, and threat was alternately resorted to, in vain, to seduce them from their allegiance to the handful of Europeans, who, in all probability, would have been...
Side 561 - Residency , they occupied these houses, some of which were within easy pistol shot of our barricades, in immense force, and rapidly made loop-holes on those sides which bore on our post, from which they kept up a terrific and incessant fire day and night, which caused many daily casualties, as there could not have been less than 8,000 men firing at one time into our position.
Side 558 - ADC from the commencement of the disturbances, - had conducted themselves throughout this arduous day. Sir Henry further particularly mentioned that he would bring the gallant conduct of Captain Radcliffe and of Lieutenant Bonham, of the Artillery, (who worked the howitzer successfully until incapacitated by a wound,) to the prominent notice of the Government of India. The manner in which Lieutenant Birch, 71st Native Infantry, cleared a village with a party of Sikh skirmishes, also elicited the...
Side 478 - From every pit, trench, and battery — -from behind the sand-bags piled on shattered houses — from every post still held by a few gallant spirits — rose cheer on cheer, even from the hospital.
Side 560 - July, when he expired, and the Government was thereby deprived, if I may venture to say so, of the services of a distinguished statesman and a most gallant soldier. Few men have ever possessed to the same extent the power which he enjoyed of winning the hearts of all those with whom he came in contact, and thus insuring the warmest and most zealous devotion for himself and for the Government which he served.
Side 524 - Seldom, perhaps never, has it occurred to a Commander-in-Chief to publish and confirm such an order as the following one, proceeding from MajorGeneral Sir James Outram, KCB " With such a reputation as Major-General Sir James Outram has won for himself, he can well afford to share glory and honour with others.
Side 567 - An occasional spy did indeed come in with the object of inducing our sepoys and servants to desert ; but the intelligence derived from such sources was, of course, entirely untrustworthy. We sent our messengers, daily calling for aid and asking for information, none of whom ever returned until the 26th day of the siege, when a pensioner named Ungud came back with a letter from General Havelock's camp, informing us that they were...
Side 568 - August — or thirty-five days later — that the relieving force, after having fought most nobly to effect our deliverance, had been obliged to fall back for reinforcements ; and this was the last communication we received until two days before the arrival of Sir James Outram on the 25th of September. " Besides heavy visitations of cholera and small-pox, we have also had to contend against a sickness which has almost universally pervaded the garrison. Commencing with a very painful eruption, it...

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