Reliques of ancient English poetry, by T. Percy, ed. by J. V. Prichard

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J V Prichard, Thomas Percy (bp. of Dromore)
1876
 

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Side 11 - This Is one of those works which demand from critics and from the public, before attempting to estimate its merits in detail, an unqualified tribute of admiration. The first glance tells us that the book is one on which the leisure of a busy lifetime and the whole resources of an enthusiastic author have been lavished without stint .... This work is a kind of British Museum for this period and subject In small compass. It is a series of galleries of statues, gems, coins...
Side 10 - The Desert of the Exodus. Journeys on Foot in the Wilderness of the Forty Years' Wanderings, undertaken in connection with the Ordnance Survey of Sinai and the Palestine Exploration Fund. By EH PALMER, MA, Lord Almoner's Professor of Arabic and Fellow of St.
Side 34 - You violets that first appear, By your pure purple mantles known Like the proud virgins of the year, As if the spring were all your own; What are you when the rose is blown ? So, when my mistress shall be seen In form and beauty of her mind, By virtue first, then choice, a Queen, Tell me, if she were not design'd Th' eclipse and glory of her kind.
Side 160 - ... paid; He stakes his quiver, bow and arrows, His mother's doves, and team of sparrows; Loses them too; then down he throws The coral of his lip, the rose Growing on's cheek (but none knows how), With these, the crystal of his brow, And then the dimple of his chin; All these did my Campaspe win. At last he set her both his eyes, She won, and Cupid blind did rise. O Love! has she done this to thee? What shall, alas! become of me? THE SONGS OF BIRDS What bird so sings, yet so does wail? O 'tis the...
Side 14 - Botany,' when finished, will be exhaustive of the subject, and worthy of the branch of science it illustrates. ... In turning over the charmingly executed handcoloured plates of British plants "which encumber these volumes with riches, the reader cannot help being struck with the beauty of many of the humblest flowering weeds we tread on with careless step. We cannot dwell upon many of the Individuals grouped in the splendid bouquet of flowers presented...
Side 383 - Translated. In 2 vols. History of Christian Dogmas. Translated. In 2 vols. • Christian Life in the Early and Middle Ages, including his 'Light in Dark Places.
Side 57 - WHY so pale and wan, fond lover? Prithee, why so pale? Will, when looking well can't move her, Looking ill prevail? Prithee, why so pale? Why so dull and mute, young sinner?
Side 14 - A clear, bold, distinctive type enables tbe'reader to take in at a glance the arrangement and divisions of every page. And Mrs. Lankester has added to the technical description by the editor an extremely interesting popular sketch, which follows in smaller type. The English, French, and German popular names are given, and, wherever that delicate and difficult step is at all practicable, their derivation also. Medical properties, superstitions, and fancies, and poetic tributes and illusions, follow.
Side 35 - An old song, made by an aged old pate, Of an old worshipful gentleman who had a great estate, That kept a brave old house at a bountiful rate, And an old porter to relieve the poor at his gate...
Side 318 - St. George he was for England ; St. Dennis was for France, Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense.

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