Biographical Dictionary of Eminent Artists: Comprising Painters, Sculptors, Engravers, and Architects, from the Earliest Ages to the Present Time ; Interspersed with Original Anecdotes. To which is Prefixed an Introduction, Containing a Brief Account of Various Schools of Art, Volum 1

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E. Wilson, 1835

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Side 228 - None of the sober grief, no dignity of suppressed anguish, no involuntary tear, no settled meditation on the fate she meant to meet, no amorous warmth turned holy by despair ¡ in short, all was wanting that should have been there, all was there that such a story should have banished from a mind capable of conceiving such complicated woe ; woe so sternly felt, and yet so tenderly.
Side xxxviii - ... nearest to perfection. His unaffected breadth of light and shadow, the simplicity of colouring, which, holding its proper rank, does not draw aside the least part of the attention from the subject, and the solemn effect of that twilight which seems diffused over his pictures, appear to me to correspond with grave and dignified subjects, better than the more artificial brilliancy of sunshine which enlightens the pictures of Titian...
Side xxvi - I feel a self-congratulation in knowing myself capable of such sensations as he intended to excite. I reflect, not without vanity, that these Discourses bear testimony of my admiration of that truly divine man; and I should desire that the last words which I should pronounce in this Academy, and from this place, might be the name of — MICHAEL ANGELO*.
Side 35 - I could be happy," he very movingly says, "on my going home, to find some corner where I could sit down in the middle of my studies, books, and casts after the antique, to paint this work and others, Where I might have models of nature when necessary, bread and soup, and a coat to cover me ! I should...
Side xiv - There is one precept, however, in which I shall only be opposed by the vain, the ignorant, and the idle. I am not afraid that I shall repeat it too often. You must have no dependence on your own genius. If you have great talents, industry will improve them : if you have but moderate abilities, industry will supply their deficiency. Nothing is denied to well-directed labour : nothing is to be obtained without it.
Side xl - Poussin in the latter part of his life changed from his dry manner to one much softer and richer, where there is a greater union between the figures and ground; as in the Seven Sacraments in the Duke of Orleans...
Side lxiii - He spoke, and awful bends his sable brows; Shakes his ambrosial curls, and gives the nod; ' The stamp of fate and sanction of the god: High heaven with trembling the dread signal took, And all Olympus to the centre shook.
Side 249 - I have no doubt but the celebrated festivals of Louis XIV. were copied from the shows exhibited at Whitehall, in its time the most polite court in Europe. Ben Jonson was the laureate, Inigo Jones the inventor of the decorations, Laniere and Ferabosco composed the symphonies, the king, the queen, and the young nobility danced in the interludes.
Side 277 - In about seven minutes he scarcely ever failed of drawing a strong likeness of any person present, which had generally much freedom and grace, if the subject permitted. He is likewise an excellent reader of blank verse, and will immediately convince any' one that he both understands and feels the striking passages of Milton and Shakspeare.
Side 226 - He never laughed like Rabelais at nonsense that he imposed for wit ; but like Swift combined incidents that divert one from their unexpected encounter, and illustrate the tale he means to tell.

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