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TABLE 4.- Deaths from Certain Principal Causes, with Proportion per 1,000 Total Deaths,
for Minor Geographic Divisions: 1905–1906-Continued.
Northern

Southern
Central California.
California.

California.

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26.0

It appears from Table 4 that the coast counties of Northern California have a very high proportion of deaths due to diseases of the nervous system other than meningitis. This is accounted for by the fact that many of the deaths reported for this geographic division occurred at the Mendocino and Napa State Hospitals.

The interior counties of Northern California have high proportions for various epidemic diseases. Thus, the proportion for this division as compared with the average for the State is 21.4 against 3.3 for malarial fever, 19.0 against 8.0 for influenza, 12.2 against 6.4 for whooping-cough, 22.0 against 15.7 for typhoid fever, and 11.6 against 8.7 for diphtheria

In San Francisco the proportion is particularly high for diseases of the circulatory system, being 150.1 here againsť 126.3 for the State. The proportions for San Francisco are also considerably above the State averages for pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia, 92.6 against 79.7; for diarrhea and enteritis among children under 2 years of age, 30.7 against 25.9; and for suicide, 22.8 for the metropolis, against 17.5 for the State.

In the other bay counties, as in the metropolis itself, the proportion of all deaths caused by diseases of the circulatory system is very high,

and croup:

being 143.0 for this group of suburban counties, against only 126.3 for the State as a whole.

The coast counties of Central California, like the coast counties of Northern California, have a high proportion for diseases of the nervous system other than meningitis (101.6 against 81.0), and the explanation is that the returns for this division include numerous deaths at the Agnews State Hospital.

The interior counties of Central California, like the interior counties of Northern California, have high proportions for certain epidemic diseases. The proportion of all deaths caused by malarial fever is 6.8 for this division, against 3.3 for the State, and the proportion due to typhoid fever is 28.4 for the division, against 15.7 for the State.

Los Angeles has a very high proportion of deaths due to tuberculosis of the lungs. The proportion for Los Angeles is no less than 201.4, as compared with only 134.0 for the State. Los Angeles also has a high proportion for measles and for diphtheria and croup, the proportions being 8.4 and 10.4 for the county, against 4.7 and 8.7, respectively, for the entire State.

The other six counties south of Tehachapi likewise have a high proportion for tuberculosis of the lungs, 188.7 against 134.0, as well as for diseases of the nervous system other than meningitis, 100.6 against 81.0. As for the coast counties of Northern and Central California, so for the counties of Southern California, the high proportion for nervous diseases is explained by the inclusion of deaths at State hospitals. The very high proportions of all deaths caused by tuberculosis both in Los Angeles and the other counties south of Tehachapi are accounted for by the great number of newcomers from Eastern states who succumb to the “great white plague” even after they reach the Land of Sunshine.

Tuberculosis. - Table 5 brings out sharply the contrasts between different parts of the State in the mortality from tuberculosis.

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TABLE 5.-- Number and Per Cent of Total Deaths from Tuberculosis and All Other Causes,

for Geographic Divisions: 1905–1906.

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636 20.8

5,646
3,607
2,039

78.3
77.8
79.2

Northern and Central California

Coast counties
Interior counties.
Metropolitan area
Rural counties

19,813
13,776

6,037
10,143
9,670

2,616 13.2 1,814 13.2

802 13.3 1,311

12.9 1,305 13.5

17,197 86.8 11,962 86.8 5,235 86.7 8,832

87.1 8,365 86.5

It appears from this table that the 4,183 deaths from tuberculosis in California are 15.5 per cent, or over one seventh, of the total 27,026, reported in 1905–1906. Thé per cent of total deaths caused by tuberculosis is no less than 22.2 for Los Angeles and 20.8 for the other six counties south of Tehachapi. The per cent is below the State average, 15.5, for every geographic division north of Tehachapi. It is as low as 11.9 for the bay counties other than San Francisco, and only 10.6 for the interior counties of Northern California.

However, it must be remembered that deaths of newly arrived consumptives are much more numerous in Southern California than in the rest of the State. This appears clearly from Table 6, showing the length of residence in California of those who died of tuberculosis in 1905-1906.

TABLE. 6.- Deaths from Tuberculosis classified by Length of Residence in California, with

Per Cent Distribution, for Geographic Divisions: 1905–1906.

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NUMBERS. THE STATE.. Northern California

Coast counties.

Interior counties.
Central California

San Francisco
Other bay counties.
Coast counties.

Interior counties.
Southern California.

Los Angeles.
Other counties
Northern and Central Cali-

4,183

365
191

174
2,251

939 372 312 628 1,567 1,031

536

831 40 20 20 315 108 53 51 103 476 342 134

106 31 15 22 38 436 278 158

1,188
123
62
61
759
336
135

73
215
306
195
111

420 51 31 20 241 122 27 16 76

830 342 142 150 196 221 125 96

128

91 37

fornia
Coast counties
Interior counties..
Metropolitan area..
Rural counties

2,616
1,814

802
1,311
1,305

121
74
47
46
75

355
232
123
161
194

882 606 276 471 411

966 706 260 484 482

292 196

96 149 143

13.3
4.1
3.1
5.2

28.4
33.7
32.5
35.0

PER CENTS. THE STATE.. Northern California..

Coast counties.

Interior counties.
Central California
San Francisco...
Other bay counties -
Coast counties

Interior counties
Southern California.

Los Angeles.

Other counties
Northern and Central Cali-

fornia
Coast counties
Interior counties.
Metropolitan area
Rural counties

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

4.7 3.3 4.0 7.1 6.1 27.8 27.0 29.5

19.9 10.9 10.5 11.5 14.0 11.5 14.2 16.3 16.4 30.4 33.2 25.0

33.7 35.8 36.3 23.4 34.2 19.5 18.9 20.7

28.4 37.3 37.7 36.8 36.9 36.4 38.2 48.1 31.2 14,1 12.1 17.9

10.0 14.0 16.2 11.5 10.7 13.0 7.3 5.1 12.1 8.2 8.8 6.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

4.6
4.1
5.9
3.5
5.7

13.6
12.8
15.3
12.3
14.9

33.7
33.4
34.4
35.9
31.5

36.9
38.9
32.4
36.9
36.9

11.2 10.8 12.0 11.4 11.0

Table 6 shows that 27.8 per cent of those who died of tuberculosis in Southern California had lived in the State less than a year, the

per cent being 27.0 for Los Angeles and even 29.5 for the other six counties. The corresponding figure for Northern and Central California together is only 4.6, and that for the entire State is 13.3 per cent.

In fact, many of the tuberculosis victims in Southern California had been in the State only a few months. This is shown clearly by the fol. lowing tabular statement, giving the length of residence in months of those who died of tuberculosis in Los Angelės and the other counties of Southern California after having been in the State less than a year:

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It appears from the preceding tabular statement that of all who died of tuberculosis in Southern California 3.5 per cent had been in the State less than a month, altogether 10.8 per cent less than three months, and altogether 18.4 per cent less than six months. In Los Angeles 17.9 per cent, and in the other counties 19.6 per cent, of the total victims of tuberculosis had lived in California less than half a year.

Referring again to Table 6, one finds that while in Southern California altogether 58.2 per cent of all tuberculosis victims had lived in the State less than 10 years, in Northern and Central California together only 18.2 per cent had lived here this length of time, the per cent for the whole State being 33.2.

Native Californians form a considerable proportion of all who succumb to tuberculosis in Northern and Central California. Thus, the per cent of native Californians among all who died of tuberculosis is 37.3 for Northern California, and 36.9 for Central California, as compared with 28.4 for the entire State, and only 14.1 for Southern California.

Similarly, deaths of old-time residents from tuberculosis are relatively more numerous north than south of Tehachapi. The per cent of tuberculosis victims who had lived here at least ten years is 33.7 for both Northern and Central California, against 19.5 for Southern California and an average of 28.4 for the whole State.

(Concluded in Monthly Bulletin for October.)

VITAL STATISTICS FOR SEPTEMBER. Summary.-For September there were reported 1,741 living births; 1,906 deaths, exclusive of stillbirths; and 1,444 marriages, the marriage returns being incomplete. For an estimated State population of 1,882,483 in 1906 the returns for September give the following annual rates: Births, 11.1; deaths, 12.1; and marriages, 9.2, per 1,000 population.

As usual, tuberculosis was the leading cause of death, and typhoid fever was the most fatal epidemic disease.

Cruses of Death.—The following table gives the number of deaths due to certain principal causes in September, as well as the proportion from each cause per 1,000 total deaths for both September and August:

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ALL CAUSES.
Typhoid fever.
Malarial fever.
Smallpox
Measles
Scarlet fever
Whooping-cough
Diphtheria and croup.
Influenza
Other epidemic diseases
Tuberculosis of lungs.
Tuberculosis of other organs
Cancer
Other general diseases
Meningitis
Other diseases of nervous system
Diseases of circulatory system.
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia
Other diseases of respiratory system
Diarrhea and enteritis, under 2 years
Diarrhea and enteritis, 2 years and over
Other diseases of digestive system
Bright's disease and nephritis
Childbirth
Early infancy
Suicide.
Other violence
All other causes-

Tuberculosis, as usual, was the leading cause of death in September, but diseases of the circulatory system (heart disease, etc.) were a close second. Altogether 250 deaths, or 13.1 per cent of all, were caused by tuberculosis of the lungs and other organs, while 229, or 12.0 per cent, were due to various diseases of the circulatory system.

Of the epidemic diseases, typhoid fever caused 56 deaths in the month, malarial fever 17, diphtheria and croup 12, whooping-cough 6, and measles 3.

DUTIES OF PARENTS TO CHILDREN. In each of the last two numbers of the Bulletin we have had occasion to speak of the school system of California in relation to the health and wellbeing of the children. It was done in the firm conviction that our children are suffering from its evil effects and that the coming generation will pay the penalty in men and women, many of whom are shattered in constitution and most of whom are poorly educated when viewed from the standpoint of productive usefulness. It is an age of restlessness and ambition, and we are living and acting on too high a tension. Men and women are striving to accumulate wealth, social renown and political influence and are urging their children forward to

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