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COL Your officers have seen this work out so conclusively that it is with the satisietion of having done an economical job that we call your attention to the fact that

(a) Last year's outdoor advertising, which cost $50,000 to prepare, would here cost a million and a quarter to buy outright:

(b)* Last year's newspaper campaign, 2,000 pages, would have cost above a million dollars to buy;

(c) Our radio program, over 270 stations, would cost another million doliars

I could recite a similar series of savings, involving less money but nevertheless impressive, on all phases of our program, because it is on a stimulating basis.

Coming back to the Harmony series of newspaper pages, these advertisementa were offered for local acceptance and financing for two reasons; first it depenka entirely on local conditions, local judgment and local desire as to whether tha particular type of advertisement be run in a city. They were designed to correct local conditions where deemed necessary. If, therefore, they are wanted and needed locally, the expense, we reasoned, should be definitely local. Secondly

, to run this campaign in every industrial city, paid for nationally, would cost there than three times all the money raised.

When we first came across this series it was being sold by an advertising agenes for sums as high as $1,800 for the ads alone, no space. We have made then available without cost.

This making them available without cost by the N. A. M. represents mere service and saving that are reflected in the N. A. M. part of the expense. I each city prepared its own the expense of multiple art work, typesetting and agenes commission would be enormous. The difference between the rate you pay to your local paper and that required of national advertisers means another sizabie saving. Many manufacturers, not members of the N. A. M. and not contributors to the public information field, would through local solicitation share in the costs

Our effort in this connection was in line with N. A. M.'s continual attempt to use the funds available to motivate action in behalf of industry rather than attempting to underwrite the total cost of advertising or other programs.

As a matter of fact, it is the judicious use of money as a stimulus that permits us, within our budget, to reach the public day after day on a national scale through every known avenue of approach-newspaper services, radio, motion pictures slide films, outdoor advertising, direct mail, speakers, etc.

I think you will be interested to know that early evidence of interest-more than 500 full page advertisements (Harmony series) have

already been scheduled in a period of two or three weeks—would seem to indicate that the advertisements are finding wide acceptance in numerous communities and that they are meeting a long felt need in these particular communities.

I should be pleased to have you write me again if any question remains in your mind, but I hope this letter satisfactorily answers your query on the matter.

Sincerely yours,

President.

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SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE OMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND LABOR

UNITED STATES SENATE

SEVENTY-FIFTH CONGRESS

THIRD SESSION

PURSUANT TO

S. Res. 266

(74th Congress)
A RESOLUTION TO INVESTIGATE VIOLATIONS OF THE
RIGHT OF FREE SPEECH AND ASSEMBLY AND
INTERFERENCE WITH THE RIGHT OF
LABOR TO ORGANIZE AND BAR-

GAIN COLLECTIVELY

PART 18
EMPLOYER ASSOCIATIONS AND “CITIZENS'

COMMITTEES"

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EDUCATIONAL AND PUBLICITY PROGRAMS
HE USE OF ADVERTISING TO OPPOSE UNIONS AND STRIKES

THE NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL COUNCIL
THE REMINGTON RAND STRIKE OF 1936

MARCH 4, 7, AND 8, 1938

Printed for the use of the Committee on Education and Labor

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON : 1938

1

OF LABOR

HEARINGS

BEFORE A

SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND LABOR

UNITED STATES SENATE

SEVENTY-FIFTH CONGRESS

THIRD SESSION

PURSUANT TO

S. Res. 266

(74th Congress)
A RESOLUTION TO INVESTIGATE VIOLATIONS OF THE
RIGHT OF FREE SPEECH AND ASSEMBLY AND
INTERFERENCE WITH THE RIGHT OF
LABOR TO ORGANIZE AND BAR-

GAIN COLLECTIVELY

PART 18

EMPLOYER ASSOCIATIONS AND "CITIZENS'

COMMITTEES”

National Association of Manufacturers

EDUCATIONAL AND PUBLICITY PROGRAMS
THE USE OF ADVERTISING TO OPPOSE UNIONS AND STRIKES

THE NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL COUNCIL
THE REMINGTON RAND STRIKE OF 1936

MARCH 4, 7, AND 8, 1938

Printed for the use of the Committee on Education and Labor

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COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND LABOR

ELBERT D. THOMAS, Utah, Chairman DAVID I. WALSH, Massachusetts

WILLIAM E. BORAH, Idaho JAMES E. MURRAY, Montana

ROBERT M. LA FOLLETTE, JR., Wisconsin VIC DONAHEY, Ohio

JAMES J. DAVIS, Pennsylvania
RUSH D. HOLT, West Virginia
CLAUDE PEPPER, Florida
ALLEN J. ELLENDER, Louisiana
JOSH LEE, Oklahoma
LESTER HILL, Alabama

EARL B. WIXCEY, Clerk
KENNETH C. ROBERTSON, Assistant Clerk

SUBCOMMITTEE ON SENATE RESOLUTION 266

ROBERT M. LA FOLLETTE, JR., Wisconsin, Chairman

ELBERT D. THOMAS, Utah
ROBERT WOHLFORTH, Secretary

DAVID D. LLOYD, of Counsel
DANIEL F. MARGOLIES, of Counsel

II

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