The Popular Science Monthly, Volum 17

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D. Appleton, 1880

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Side 68 - Why, thy face is valanced since I saw thee last: com'st thou to beard me in Denmark/— What, my young lady and mistress! By'r lady, your ladyship is nearer to heaven, than when I saw you last, by the altitude of a chopine.
Side 494 - That man, I think, has had a liberal education who has been so trained in youth that his body is the ready servant of his will, and does with ease and pleasure all the work that as a mechanism it is capable of; whose intellect is a clear, cold logic engine with all its parts of equal strength and in smooth working order; ready like a steam engine to be turned to any kind of work, and spin the gossamers as well as forge the anchors of the mind...
Side 101 - ... when it is perfectly formed, the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the foresaid lace or string : next come the legs of the bird hanging out, and, as it groweth greater, it openeth the shell by degrees, till at length it is all come forth, and hangeth onely by the bill : in short space after it commeth to full maturitie, and falleth into the sea, where it gathereth feathers, and groweth to a fowle bigger than a mallard, and lesser than a goose...
Side 338 - History warns us, however, that it is the customary fate of new truths to begin as heresies and to end as superstitions...
Side 838 - It is impossible by means of inanimate material agency to derive mechanical effect from any portion of matter by cooling it below the temperature of the coldest of the surrounding objects.
Side 820 - Mr. Bell, if you hear what I say, come to the window and wave your hat.
Side 145 - I may as well abruptly avow, as the result of my reading and observation in the matter of education, that I recognize but one mental acquisition as an essential part of the education of a lady or a gentleman, — namely, an accurate and refined use of the mother tongue.
Side 791 - Hooke, or me, two months' time, to bring him a convincing demonstration thereof; and besides the honour, he of us, that did it, should have from him a present of a book of 40 shillings.
Side 312 - It was at first a very pleasing divertisement to view the vivid and intense colours produced thereby; but after a while applying myself to consider them more circumspectly, I became surprised to see them in an oblong form, which, according to the received laws of Refraction, I expected should have been circular.
Side 101 - ... falleth into the sea, where it gathereth feathers, and groweth to a foule, bigger than a Mallard, and lesser than a Goose ; having blacke legs and bill or beake, and feathers blacke and white...

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