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"I do solemnly swear (or affirm, as the case may be) that I will support the Constitution of the United States, and the Constitution of the State of New-York; and that I will faithfully discharge the duties of the office of according to the best of my ability."

And no other oath, declaration, or test shall be required as a qualification for any office or public trust.

ARTICLE XIII.

Sec. 1. Any amendment or amendments to this Constitution may be proposed in the Senate and Assembly; and if the same shall be agreed to by a majority of the members elected to each of the two houses, such proposed amendment or amendments shall be entered on their journals with the yeas and nays taken thereon, and referred to the Legislature to be chosen at the next general election of Senators, and shall be published for three months previous to the time of making such choice; and if in the Legislature so next chosen, as aforesaid, such proposed amendment or amendments shall be agreed to by a majority of all the members elected to each house, then it shall be the duty of the Legislature to submit such proposed amendment or amendments to the people, in such manner and at such time as the Legislature shall prescribe; and if the people shall approve and ratify such amendment or amendments, by a majority of the electors qualified to vote for members of the Legislature, voting thereon, such amendment or amendments shall become part of the Constitution.

2. At the general election to be held in the year eighteen hundred and sixty-six, and in each twentieth year thereafter, and also at such time as the Legislature may by law provide, the question, "Shall there be a Convention to revise the Constitution, and amend the same?" shall be decided by the electors qualified to vote for members of the Legislature; and in case a majority of the electors so qualified, voting at such election, shall decide in favor of a Convention for such purpose, the Legislature, at its next session, shall provide by law for the election of delegates to such Convention.

ARTICLE XIV.

Sec. 1. The first election of senators and members of Assembly, pursuant to the provisions of this Constitution, shall be held on the Tuesday succeeding the first Monday of November, one thousand eight hundred and forty-seven.

The senators and members of Assembly who may be in office on the first day of January, one thousand eight hundred and fortyseven, shall hold their offices until and including the thirty-first day of December following, and no longer.

2. The first election of Governor and Lieutenant-Governor under this Constitution, shall be held on the Tuesday succeeding the first Monday of November, one thousand eight hundred and forty-eight; and the Governor and Lieutenant-Governor in office when this Constitution shall take effect, shall hold their respective offices until and including the thirty-first day of December of that year.

3. The Secretary of State, Comptroller, Treasurer, AttorneyGeneral, District-Attorney, Surveyor-General, canal commissioners, and inspectors of State prisons, in office when this Constitution shall take effect, shall hold their respective offices until and including the thirty-first day of December, one thousand eight hundred and fortyseven, and no longer.

4. The first election of judges and clerk of the Court of Appeals, justices of the Supreme Court, and county judges, shall take place at such time between the first Tuesday of April and the second Tuesday of June, one thousand eight hundred and forty-seven, as may be prescribed by law. The said courts shall respectively enter upon their duties on the first Monday of July next thereafter; but the term of office of said judges, clerk and justices, as declared by this Constitution, shall be deemed to commence on the first day of January, one thousand eight hundred and forty-eight.

5. On the first Monday of July, one thousand eight hundred and forty-seven, jurisdiction of all suits and proceedings then pending in the present Supreme Court and Court of Chancery, and all suits and proceedings originally commenced and then pending in any court of common pleas, (except in the city and county of New-York,) shall become vested in the Supreme Court hereby established. Proceedings pending in courts of common pleas and in suits originally commenced in justices' courts, shall be transferred to the county courts provided for in this Constitution, in such manner and form and under such regulation as shall be provided by law. The courts of oyer and terminer hereby established, shall, in their respective counties, have jurisdiction, on and after the day last mentioned, of all indictments and proceedings then pending in the present courts of oyer and terminer, and also of all indictments and proceedings then pending in the present courts of general sessions of tho peace, except in the city of New York, and except in cases of which the courts of sessions hereby established may lawfully take cognizance; and of such indictments and proceedings the courts of sessions hereby established shall have jurisdiction on and after the day last mentioned.

6. The Chancellor and the present Supreme Court shall, respectively, have power to hear and determine any of such suits and proceedings ready on the first Monday of July, one thousand eight hundred and forty-seven, for hearing or decision, and shall, for their services therein, be entitled to their present rates of compensation until the first day of July, one thousand eight hundred and fortyeight, or until all such suits and proceedings shall be sooner heard and determined. Masters in chancery may continue to exercise the functions of their office in the Court of Chancery, so long as the Chancellor shall continue to exercise the functions of his office under the provisions of this Constitution.

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New Jersey was settled by the Dutch from New York, as early as 1620. The first settlement was at Bergen. In 1627 a colony of Swedes and Fins located themselves on the Delaware. This State was included in the gran! of New York from Charles II. to the Duke of York. In 1664 the Duke made a grant of New Jersey to Lord Berkley and Sir George Carteret. They, by an agreement with the people, established a provincial government in 1665. The Dutch subdued the country in 1672, but resigned it by treaty in 1674. To avoid any difficulty in reference to titles, the Duke of York took out a new patent, and divided the province into East and West Jersey. "West Jerseywas assigned to the heirs of Lord Berkley, and East Jersey to Sir George Carteret. In 1675 the whole territory was purchased by a company of English emigrants. They located at Salem, and formed the first English settlement in this State. At length much dissatisfaction arose in regard to titles, which created great confusion—in consequence of which the appointment of Governor was rendered very difficult. It was carried so far, that in 1702 the proprietors surrendered the government to the English crown. This was accepted by Glueen Anne, who established a royal government, which continued until the Revolution of 1776. Some of the hardest battles of the Revolutionary war were fought in this State. The first Constitution was adopted byNew Jersey as a colony, in 1776. This remained unaltered until 1844, when the present Constitution was agreed upon as a substitute

Area, 8,320 sq. m. Population, 1840, 373,306.

CONSTITUTION.

In Convention, begun at Trenton, on the fourteenth day of May, and continued to the twenty-ninth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-four:

We, the people of the State of New-Jersey, grateful to Almighty God for the civil and religious liberty which he hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to him for a blessing upon our endeavors to secure and transmit the same unimpaired to succeeding generations, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

ARTICLE I.—Rights and Privileges.

Sec. 1. All men are by nature free and independent, and have certain natural and inalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing, and protecting property, and of pursuing and obtaining safety and happiness,

2. All political power is inherent in the people.

Government is instituted for the protection, security, and benefit of the people, and they have the right at all times to alter or reform the same, whenever the public good may require it.

3. No person shall be deprived of the inestimable privilege of worshiping Almighty God in a manner agreeably to the dictatesof his own conscience: nor under any pretence whatever be compelled to attend any place of worship contrary to his faith and judgment; nor shall any person be obliged to pay tithes, taxes, or other rates, for building or repairing any church or churches, place or places of worship, or for the maintenance of any minister or ministry, contrary to what he believes to be right, or has deliberately and voluntarily engaged to perform.

4. There shall be no establishment of one religious sect in preference to another : no religious test shall be required as a qualification for any office or public trust; and no person shall be denied the enjoyment of any civil right merely on account of his religious principles.

5. Every person may freely speak, write, and publish his sentiments on all subjects, being responsible for the abuse of that right. No law shall be passed to restrain or abridge the liberty of speech, or of the press. In all prosecutions or indictments for libel, the truth may be given in evidence to the jury; and if it shall appear to the jury that the matter charged as libellous is true, and was published with good motives, and for justifiable ends, the party shall be acquitted; and the jury shall have the right to determine the law and the fact.

6. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated ; and no warrant shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the papers and things to be seized.

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