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amendments, and two-thirds of each house of the next Legislature shall, after such election, and before another, ratify the same amendments by yeas and nays, they shall be valid, to all intents and purposes, as parts of this Constitution: provided, that the said proposed amendments shall, at each of the said sessions, have been read on three several days in each house.

ARTICLE VIII.—Slaves. Sec 1. The Legislature shall have no power to pass laws for the emancipation of slaves, without the consent of their owners, nor without paying (heir owners, previous to such emancipation, a full equivalent in money for the slaves so emancipated. They shall have no power to prevent emigrants to this State from bringing with them such persons as are deemed slaves by the laws of any of the United States, so long as any person of the same age or description shall be continued in slavery by the laws of this State: provided, that such slave be the bona fide property of such emigrants: provided, also, that laws shall be passed to inhibit the introduction into this State of slaves who have committed high crimes in other States or Territories. They shall have the right to pass laws to permit the owners of slaves to emancipate them, saving the rights of creditors, and preventing them from becoming a public charge. They shall have full power to pass laws which will oblige the owners of slaves to treat them with humanity; to provide for them necessary food and clothing; to abstain from all injuries to them extending to life or limb; and, in case of their neglect or refusal to comply with the directions of such laws, to have such slave or slaves taken from such owner, and sold for the benefit of such owner or owners. They may pass laws to prevent slaves from being brought into this State as merchandize only.

2. In the prosecution of slaves for crimes of a higher grade than petit larceny, the Legislature shall have no power to deprive them of an impartial trial by a petit jury.

3. Any person who shall maliciously dismember, or deprive a slave of life, shall suffer such punishment as would be inflicted in case the like offence had been committed upon a free white person, and on like proof, except in case of insurrection of such slave.

ARTICLE IX.—Impeachment. Sec. I. The power of impeachment shall be vested in the House of Representatives.

2. Impeachments of the Governor, Lieutenant-governor, attorney-general, secretary of State, treasurer, comptroller, and of the judges of the district courts, shall be tried by the Senate.

3. Impeachments of judges of the Supreme Court shall be tried by the Senate. When sitting as a court of impeachment, the senators shall be upon oath or affirmation; and no person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the senators present. .

4. Judgment in cases of impeachment shall extend only to removal from office, and disqualification from holding any office of honor, trust or profit, under this State; but the parties convicted shall, nevertheless, be subject to indictment, trial, and punishment, according to law.

5. All officers against whom articles of impeachment may be preferred, shall be suspended from the exercise of the duties of their office during the pendency of such impeachment; the appointing power may make a provisional appointment, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the suspension of an officer, until fhe decision on the impeachment.

6. The Legislature shall provide for the trial, punishment, and removal from office, of all other officers 6f the State, by indictment, or otherwise.

ARTICLE X.—Education. Sec 1. A general diffusion of knowledge being essential to the preservation of the rights and liberties of the people, it shall be the duty of the Legislature of this State to make suitable provision for the support and maintenance of public schools. ,

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The attention of emigrants has been turned, with peculiar interest, towards this new State. It is now settling more rapidly than any other portion of the great West. Iowa formed the territorial government in 1838. In 1844 it adopted a Constitution, and asked to be admitted into the union as an independent State. A law was passed by Congress for that purpose in 1845, which altered the bounds fixed in tho Constitution. It was rejected, because it diminished its territory. In 1846 terms were agreed upon, and Iowa became the 29th State in the union.

Area, 150,000 sq. m. Pop. in 1844, 81,920.

CONSTITUTION.

ARTICLE I.—Preamble and Boundaries.

We, the people of the territory of Iowa, grateful to the Supreme Being for the blessings hitherto enjoyed, and feeling our dependence on Him for a continuation of these blessings, do ordain and establish a free and independent government, by the name of the State of Iowa, the boundaries whereof shall be as follows:

Beginning in the middle of the main channel of the Mississippi river, at a point due east of the middle of the mouth of the main channel of the Des Moines river, thence up the middle of the main channel of the said Des Moines river, to a point on said river where the northern boundary line of the State of Missouri, as established by the Constitution of that State, adopted June 12th,

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