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IN CANNING

BEING A THOROUGH EXPOSITION OF THE BEST,
PRACTICAL METHODS OF HERMETICALLY SEAL-
ING CANNED FOODS, AND PRESERVING

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES.

Originally Republished from the serial articles appearing in

“THE CANNING TRADE"
The Canned Food Authority.

Revised Up to Date.

FOURTH EDITION.

Completely Revised 1919.

COPYRIGHT 1914 BY

THE CANNING TRADE

BALTIMORE, MD.

COPYRIGHT 1919 BY

THE CANNING TRADE

BALTIMORE, MD.

From
the Press

of
"The
Canning
Trade"

DEDICATED

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HE preservation of foods, whether in the canned state or known as jams, preserves, jellies, condi

ments or others, has developed wonderfully in the past quarter century, and particularly has the canning of foods. Back in those early days, when "A Complete Course in Canning" first made its appearance, it was the late W. L. Hinchman, Ph. G., who laid its foundations of times and procedure, just as he was the directing genius in untold numbers of plants which produce articles which now rank among the leaders in all markets. Hinchman was a font of knowledge in food preservation matters, which only those who sought its depths came to know and appreciate. A trained chemist and pharmacist, his knowledge of commercial food products was practical and at the disposal of any one in doubt. He did more to promote this industry than most men realize, and it is to pay him some slight tribute that this volume is dedicated to him.

He was not the sole author of the first edition of this work, but collaborated to a large extent in its production, and to a smaller degree in later revisions, but he is rightly entitled to consideration as one of the founders of the practical processes upon which the present great structure of the business has been built. And the world is coming to recognize this.

This latest revision sees the elimination of much of the earliest work, as must be in the march of , the changes, made by our foremost food men, are improvements and not innovations as a rule. And this stands as a lasting testimonial to any man: That is principal he was right, though time enforces changes.

A. I. JUDGE.

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Standing for a generation, as THE CANNING TRADE has stood, the representative journal of the canned food industry and all that that implies; having begun its existence when the business of hermetically sealing or preserving foods was itself in its infancy, and having been intimately associated with every movement of that great industry in its rapid advancement; fighting its battles at a time when the industry was weakest; suggesting the advantages of and actually forming the first Association of Canners, and instrumental in the formation of every one since; known to all men in any way connected with the industry as the honest, fearless champion of the canned food packer, it is but natural that the requests for a reliable work, one that would be of practical use to all, in the factory itself, should come to THE CANNING TRADE.

These requests have come from every section and from men in every branch of the industry, covering every article handled by the packers. In the early years they were the natural outcome of the effort on the part of all in the industry to make a secret of the process, but for this reason it must not be supposed these requests came only from new parties wishing to go into the business. Men who had made a success packing certain articles wished to increase the number, and experience had taught them that a good beginning was half the battle won. These frequent requests compelled us to gather the desired information, and in seeking, naturally we chose the best obtainable. This was copied in a large book, and the frequent additions soon made the book practically complete. But not only were formulæ thus collected, but accounts of the varied experiences in different sections of the country with certain foods by the different packers, were kept in this record. And thus was compiled, little by little, an amount of information on the processing and preserving of foods, from the leading processors of the day, that without doubt had not its equal in the world. It afforded comparisons that were most instructive, one processor's method with another's, one way of treating a fruit or vegetable with another in vogue somewhere else, the effect a difference of seasons, whether wet or dry, had upon the time and results, all of which was from actual work in the process room, and not from theory.

As may be supposed, it took years to accumulate this mass of valuable information, and our object may be seen in the book we herewith present.

“A Complete Course in Canning" is not a copy of the records of the book above referred to; it was originally written by a man who had had a vast experience in canning, preserving, pickling, and in every branch of food preserving, not in one section, but in almost

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