Addresses and Proceedings - National Education Association of the United States, Volum 44

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Vols. for 1866-70 include Proceedings of the American Normal School Association; 1866-69 include Proceedings of the National Association of School Superintendents; 1870 includes Addresses and journal of proceedings of the Central College Association.
 

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Child Labor and Compulsory EducationMartin
103
The Social and Legal Aspect of Compulsory Education and Child LaborGiddings
113
Manual Training in the GradesHarvey
121
The Practical Utility of Manual and Technical TrainingParsons
134
The Economic Importance of Trade SchoolsVanderlip
141
ResponsesKirk Miss Blake 150
150
Review of the Educational Features of the Universal Exposition
161
Lessons from the United States ExhibitBlewett
173
Means of Increasing the Efficiency of Our PublicSchool Work
180
Some of the Conditions Which Cause Variation in School ExpendituresHarris
195
The Group Morality of ChildrenVincent
214
A Nonpartisan School LawEliot
223
Round Table of State and County Superintendents
236
Manual Training in the Elementary SchoolHaney
253
Child LaborMiss Addams
259
NATIONAL COUNCIL
271
Report of Advisory Committee on Simplification of SpellingMaxwell
281
What Are the Most Promising Subjects for Investigation ?
320
Memorial Addresses
329
DEPARTMENT OF KINDERGARTEN EDUCATION
341
How Does the Kindergarten Develop the Child Physically?Mrs Hughes
347
Methods of Supervision of PublicSchool KindergartensMiss Mills
354
Current Criticism of the KindergartenOShea
365
DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
373
The Teaching of Arithmetic in Elementary SchoolsBailey
380
A Handwork in Primary SchoolsMiss Seegmiller
387
Reading in the First School YearMrs Cooley
393
On the Psychology of Reading and WritingMacDougall
399
On the Study of English CompositionMiss Alexander
407
Teaching Our Language to NonEnglishSpeaking PupilsStraubenmiilUr
413
DEPARTMENT OF SECONDARY EDUCATION
423
Why Do So Many FirstYear Pupils Leave the High School ?Halleck 436 Report of the Committee on Secret FraternitiesMorrison
445
ROUND TABLE CONFERENCES
452
Mathematics
466
F Moder n Languages
475
DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION
481
Wide Election and Minute CoursesCanfield
495
Plans of Admitting Students to Colleges and UniversitiesMacLean
501
Should Chairs of Pedagogy Be Abolished?Hill
512
A Statement of the Issues Before the DepartmentVan Liew
519
DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC EDUCATION
627
Questions Involved in Making Music a Major StudyScott
633
Music as a Factor in CultureLocke 044
644
Relation of the Grade Teacher to Music InstructionFulmer
650
Music Instruction in the Schools of New York CityRix
657
Report of Committee on Music in the GradesHayden 667
667
What Should Be the Education of a Business Man ?Walker
674
The Study of Local Industry and TradeTildsley
682
Essential Elements of Study in a University Course in Commerce
689
From the Point of View of the University of PennsylvaniaYoung
696
DEPARTMENT OF CHILD STUDY
707
Child Study in Normal SchoolsSmith
714
Child Study in Special ClubsMiss Marsh
721
A Problem for Womens ClubsMiss Lawrence 7t
727
Relation of the Childs Development to Control of HimMiss Tanner
734
The School and the Childs Physical DevelopmentRowe
742
Notes on a Few Books in Child StudyWilson
751
The Importance of the SchoolYard for ChildrenArnold 75r
760
Physical Training in Grammar SchoolsMiss Stoncroad
773
Secretarys Minutes
781
Correlation of Mathematics and ScienceComstock
788
Science Teaching in Elementary SchoolsNewman
798
Common Insects and How Children Can Study ThemSmith
807
Teaching Biology with a Projection MicroscopeCole v
814
DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION
827
Recent Progress in School ArchitectureDavis
836
Needed Legislation in School ArchitectureSnyder
843
LIBRARY DEPARTMENT
853
How to Make the Library Useful to HighSchool PupilsWright
864
The Value and Place of Fairy StoriesChubb
871
DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION
881
Our Limitations in Educating Mentally Deficient ChildrenMiss Pogue
895
The Schools for the FeebleMindedJohnstone
903
All Crime is DiseaseLinsley
914
DEPARTMENT OF INDIAN EDUCATION
925
Music of the American IndianMiss Curtis
933
Indian Education and Methods of InstructionMrs Quintan
947
The Necessity for More and BetterEquipped Day SchoolsDuncan
954
Drawing Teachers Congress at BerneCarter 597
961
Charter Provisions as Related to the Reorganization of School SystemsSoldan 231
966

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Side 489 - Tell me where is fancy bred, Or in the heart or in the head? How begot, how nourished! Reply, reply. It is engendered in the eyes. With gazing fed ; and fancy dies In the cradle where it lies. Let us all ring fancy's knell : I'll begin it, — Ding, dong, bell.
Side 139 - Engineer, being the art of directing the great sources of power in Nature for the use and convenience of man...
Side 3 - ... two years, one for three years and one for four years beginning on November 1, 1935.
Side 642 - If music and sweet poetry agree, As they must needs, the sister and the brother, Then must the love be great "twixt thee and me, Because thou lov'st the one, and I the other. Dowland to thee is dear, whose heavenly touch Upon the lute doth ravish human sense ; Spenser to me, whose deep conceit is such As, passing all conceit, needs no defence. Thou lov'st to hear the sweet melodious...
Side 1 - Association," for the full period of twenty years, the purpose and objects of which are to elevate the character and advance the interests of the profession of teaching and to promote the cause of popular education in the United States...
Side 643 - THE night has a thousand eyes, And the day but one; Yet the light of the bright world dies With the dying sun. The mind has a thousand eyes, And the heart but one; Yet the light of a whole life dies When love is done.
Side 34 - Education and the following departments, and such others as may hereafter be created by organization or consolidation, to wit: the Departments, first, of Superintendence; second, of Normal Schools; third, of Elementary Education; fourth, of Higher Education; fifth, of Manual Training; sixth, of Art Education; seventh, of Kindergarten Education; eighth, of Music Education; ninth, of Secondary Education; tenth, of Business Education; eleventh, of Child Study; twelfth, of Physical Education; thirteenth,...
Side 5 - That the purpose and object of the said corporation shall be to elevate the character and advance the interests of the profession of teaching, and to promote the cause of education in the United States.
Side 43 - ... prematurely. 6. It is the duty of the state to provide for the education of every child within its borders, and to see that all children obtain the rudiments of an education. The constitutional provision that all persons must contribute to the support of the public schools logically carries...
Side 503 - The association of colleges and preparatory schools in the middle states and Maryland came into existence in 1892, growing out of the college association of Pennsylvania, established five years earlier.

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