English Literature: From Milton to Johnson, by Edmund Goose

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Side 332 - Seven years, my lord, have now passed since I waited in your outward rooms, or was repulsed from your door; during which time I have been pushing on my work through difficulties, of which it is useless to complain, and have brought it at last to the verge of publication, without one act of assistance, one word of encouragement, or one smile of favour.
Side 153 - He cast (of which we rather boast) The gospel's pearl upon our coast, And in these rocks for us did frame A temple, where to sound His name. Oh, let our voice His praise exalt Till it arrive at Heaven's vault, Which then perhaps rebounding may Echo beyond the Mexique bay.
Side 332 - Is not a patron, my Lord, one who looks with unconcern on a man struggling for life in the water, and, when he has reached ground, encumbers him with help ? The notice which you have been pleased to take of my labours, had it been early, had been kind: but it has been delayed till I am indifferent, and cannot enjoy it; till I am solitary, and cannot impart it; till I am known, and do not want it.
Side 25 - Prison WHEN Love with unconfined wings Hovers within my gates, And my divine Althea brings To whisper at the grates — When I lie tangled in her hair And fettered to her eye, The birds that wanton in the air Know no such liberty.
Side 149 - Through all the compass of the notes it ran, The diapason closing full in man. What passion cannot music raise and quell? When Jubal struck the chorded shell, His listening brethren stood around, And, wondering, on their faces fell To worship that celestial sound. Less than a God they thought there could not dwell Within the hollow of that shell, That spoke so sweetly and so well.
Side 153 - Apples plants of such a price, No Tree could ever bear them twice. With Cedars chosen by his hand, From Lebanon he stores the Land. And makes the hollow Seas, that roar, Proclaim the Ambergris on shore.
Side 55 - NATURE hath made men so equal in the faculties of body and mind as that, though there be found one man sometimes manifestly stronger in body or of quicker mind than another, yet when all is reckoned together the difference between man and man is not so considerable as that one man can thereupon claim to himself any benefit to which another may not pretend as well as he.
Side 148 - DIM as the borrowed beams of moon and stars | To lonely, weary, wandering travellers,* ' Is reason to the soul : and as, on high, Those rolling fires discover but the sky, Not light us here ; so reason's glimmering ray Was lent, not to assure our doubtful way, But guide us upward to a better day. And as those nightly tapers disappear, When day's bright lord ascends our hemisphere ; So pale grows reason at religion's sight, ~ So dies, and so dissolves in supernatural light.
Side 19 - ASK me no more whither do stray The golden atoms of the day, For in pure love heaven did prepare Those powders to enrich your hair.
Side 202 - See heaven its sparkling portals wide display, And break upon thee in a flood of day ! No more the rising sun shall gild the morn, Nor evening Cynthia fill her silver horn ; But lost, dissolved, in thy superior rays, One tide of glory, one unclouded blaze, O'erflow thy courts : the Light himself shall shine Revealed, and God's eternal day be thine...

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