The Minnesota Handbook for 1856-7: With a New and Accurate Map

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J.P. Jewett and Company, 1857 - 159 sider
 

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Side 12 - Of these fair solitudes once stir with life And burn with passion? Let the mighty mounds That overlook the rivers, or that rise In the dim forest crowded with old oaks, Answer. A race, that long has passed away, Built them; - a disciplined and populous race Heaped, with long toil, the earth, while yet the Greek Was hewing the Pentelicus to forms Of symmetry, and rearing on its rock The glittering Parthenon.
Side 12 - Are they here The dead of other days? - and did the dust Of these fair solitudes once stir with life And burn with passion? Let the mighty mounds That overlook the rivers, or that rise In the dim forest crowded with old oaks, Answer.
Side 34 - Behind the scared squaw's birch canoe, The steamer smokes and raves ; And city lots are staked for sale Above old Indian graves.
Side 12 - When haply by their stalls the bison lowed, And bowed his maned shoulder to the yoke. All day this desert murmured with their toils, Till twilight blushed, and lovers walked and wooed In a forgotten language, and old tunes, From instruments of unremembered form, Gave the soft winds a voice. The red man came — The roaming hunter tribes...
Side 52 - The River St. Pierre . . . flows through a most delightful country, abounding with all the necessaries of life, that grow spontaneously; and with a little cultivation it might be made to produce even the luxuries of life. Wild rice grows here in great abundance; and every part is filled with trees bending under their loads of fruits, such as plums, grapes, and apples; the meadows are covered with hops, and many sorts of vegetables; whilst the ground is stored with useful roots, with angelica, spikenard,...
Side 138 - The proceeds of all lands that have been, or may hereafter be, granted by the United States to the State for the support of a university, shall be and remain a perpetual fund, to be called "The University Fund...
Side 13 - The solitude of centuries untold Has settled where they dwelt. The prairie-wolf Hunts in their meadows, and his fresh-dug den Yawns by my path. The gopher mines the ground Where stood their swarming cities.
Side 13 - ... TERRITORY, GENERAL FEATURES, ETC. THE territory of Minnesota, as organized by the act of Congress of March 3, 1849, is an extensive region, being about four times as large as the state of Ohio, and is six hundred and seventy-five miles in extent from its southeastern to its northwestern border. It extends from the Mississippi and St. Croix rivers and the western extremity of Lake Superior on the east, to the Missouri and White-Earth rivers on the west, a distance of over four hundred miles ;...
Side 128 - ... not, directly or indirectly, made any agreement or contract, in any way or manner, with any person or persons whatsoever, by which the title which he might acquire from the government of the United States should inure, in whole or in part, to the benefit of any person except himself...
Side 10 - State-rooms were entirely out of the question, and bunks upon the floor or seats at the table were at a premium. Standing at the lower end of the cabin, and gazing upon the hundreds of persons whose beds covered almost every foot of the cabin floor, I intuitively exclaimed, 'This is going West.' I mused upon the various situations and climates and nations these people had left; the misfortunes that had befallen some, and the fortunes that had fallen to others, alike impelling them to seek the 'land...

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