The Correspondence of the Late John Wilkes: With His Friends, Printed from the Original Manuscripts, in which are Introduced Memoirs of His Life, Volum 5

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Side 172 - We will still believe and maintain that our Kings derive not their title from the people but from God; that to Him only they are accountable; that it belongs not to subjects, either to create or censure, but to honour and obey their sovereign, who comes to be so by a fundamental hereditary right of succession, which no religion, no law, no fault or forfeiture can alter or diminish1.
Side 171 - And be it hereby declared, that by the undoubted and fundamental laws of this kingdom, neither the Peers of this realm, nor the Commons, nor both together in Parliament or out of Parliament, nor the People collectively or representatively, nor any other Persons whatsoever, ever had, have, hath, or ought to have, any coercive power over the persons of the Kings of this realm.
Side 52 - ... with the advice of our privy council, to issue this our royal proclamation, hereby...
Side 90 - Qui obiit anno 17 — , aetatis ; and that it be carried to the grave by six of the poorest men of the parish, to each of whom I order a suit of grey coarse cloth, as mourning.
Side 10 - ... tis a most pleasant prospect ; and I know no greater pleasure than sitting by the side of the river, reading Milton or Shakespeare to my mother. Sometimes I take my guitar and sing to her. Thus do the hours slide away imperceptibly ; with reading, writing, drawing, and music.
Side 91 - Signed, sealed, and declared by the testator, as his last will and testament, in presence of us, RADNOR.
Side 10 - Yet, dear Sir, often do we wish ourselves in England. Necessity sent us hither ; may Fortune bring us back! ' We receive much civility from the people here. We had letters of recommendation, which I would advise every English person to procure wherever he goes in France. We have visitors, even more than we wish — as we ever found the French in general very insipid. I would rather choose to converse with people much superior to me in understanding (that I grant I can easily do, so you need not smile)....
Side 11 - Tis now time to remind Mr. Wilkes of his kind promise — to exhort him to fulfil it If you knew, dear Sir, how much we are straitened as to our income, you would not neglect it. We should be truly happy to be so much obliged to you that we may join, to our admiration of Mr. Wilkes in his public character, tears of gratitude whenever we hear his name mentioned, for the peculiar service he has rendered us. Much shall we owe to Mr. Hall for that and many other favours ; but to you do we owe the kind...
Side 40 - Britain for the Support of the just and constitutional Rights and Liberties of the People of Great Britain and America...
Side 57 - Wheble, I thought it clearly my duty to adjudge, that he had been apprehended in the city illegally, in direct violation of the rights of an Englishman, and of the chartered privileges of a citizen of this metropolis, and to discharge him.

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