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sin: I have now the honor to transmit, in the shape in which it has received the royal assent, a copy of the tritish act of Parliament making the slave trade piracy. It was sent to me to-day by Mr. Huskisson, with a note, of which a copy is enclosed. It passed the House of Lords the day before yesterday, by an unanimous vote: in addition to the explanation which Mr. Huskisson af. forded me, of the clause at the end of the act, both himself and Mr. Secretary Canning have since stated to me, that a further reason for it was, that a consolidation of this act with all the other British slave trade laws and regulations, is in contemplation, perhaps in the course of the present session of Parliament, with a view to give the irritish naval officers one comprehensive code of in structions under them. I have the honor to be, with very great respect, your obedient servant, RICHARD RUSH, Hon. J. Q. ADAMs, Secretary of State.

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Mr DEAm SIR : I have the satisfaction to transmit to you three copies of the bill, which received the toyal assent yesterday, for declaring slave-trading to be piracy. ‘ishese copies are, the bill as printed for the House of Lords, in . shape, as no amendment was made in that House, it received the royal assent; but some few days will elapse before it can be published in the usual form, among the laws of the pro sent session. I have the honor to be, dear sir, your very faithful obedient servant, W. HUSKišSON. Richann Rush, &c. &c.

.Mr. Canning to Mr. Addington.
Foreign Office, April 2, 1824.

Sr* - I herewith enclose to you several copies of the bill which has now passed into a law, affixing to the crime of carrying on the slave trade by British subjects,

the pains and penalties attached to piracy. You will lose no time in calling on Mr. Adams, and communicating this act of Parliament to him, in proof of the anxiety of his Majesty to carry into early and effectual execution the convention lately concluded on this subject by the United States; and, with reference to that clause in the act which provides for possible alteration in the course of the session, you will explain to the American Minister that this clause has in view no change

Documents accompanying the President’s Message. - g

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whereas it is expedient to make further provoo for to: suppression of the African slave trade, by enacting that perso committing the offences hereinafter specified, shall be demo and adjudged to be guilty of pray Be it therefore eno by the king's Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the ado *d onsent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal on Comons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the autority of the same, That, if any subject or subjects of his Mojo or any person or persons residing or being within any ofte minions, forts, settlements, factories, or territories; no hereafter belonging to his Majesty, or being in his Mojo occupation or possession, or under the government of the to ed Company of Merchants of England o the Eastb. dies, shall, except in such cases as are, in and by the laws to in force, permitted, after the first day of January, one tho' eight hundred and twenty-five, upon the high seaso haven, river, creek, or place, where the admiral has jurisle. tion, knowingly and wilfully carry away, convey." remove, to aid or assist in carrying away, conveying.or removing, any so son or persons as a slave or slaves, or for the purposed to her, or their, being imported or brought as a slave o into any island, colony, country, territory, or place, whatso er, or for the purpose of his, her, or their, being sold, transo red, used, or dealt with as a slave or slaves; or shall, after to said first day of January, one thousand eight hundred and two ty-five, except in such cases as are, in and by the laws o' al force, permitted, upon the high seas, or within the juro aforesaid, knowingly and wilfully ship, embark, receive of tain, or confine, or assist in o embarking, recei" taining, or confining, on board any ship, vessel, or, bo person or persons, for the purpose of his, her, or their o carried away, conveyed, or removed, as a slave or slaves, o the purpose of his, her, or their being imported or bro a love or slaves, into any island, colony, country,” place, whatsoever, or for the purpose of his, her, or their, o ing sold, transferred, used, or dealt with, as a slave or * then, and in every such case, the person of person* o: ing hail be deemed and adjudged guilty of piracy, selo robbery i and, being convicted t ereof, shall suffer death wo out benefit of clergy, and loss of lands, goods, and chatteo," pirates, felons, and robbers upon the so, ought to suffer.

ii. Provided always, and it is hereby further *: desired, that nothing in this act contained, mo"; and coclaring the aforesaid offences to be piracies, felonies, *. ries, shall be construed to repeal, annul, or alter, the Po sions and enactments of any other aetor * contained o posing forfeitures and penalties, or either of them, "P" o same offences, or to repeal, annul, or alter; the remedo. o for the recovery thereof; but that the said provision. " o medies shall, in all respects, be deemed and taken." be o in in oil force, as they existed immediolo o passing of this act: Provided, also, that nothing lo, tained shall be construed to repeal, annul, or alter, an o enactments or provisions contained in an *. passed in o first year of his late Majesty, intituled “An act for o' o more effectual an act made in the fort F-seventh year of ho . jesty's reign, entitled ‘An act for the abolition of io trade;” except so far as such enactment” ". po o tered or varied by this act, but that the said act shall,' other respects, remain in full force and effect. "hat also

it."o be it further enacted and declaro To * :* every the offences, hereinbefore specified, shall an: o so inquired of, either according to the ordinary cours: "" * the provisions of an act passed in the twenty-eighth 'o. reign of King Henry the Eightli, intituled "A" act for

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oth ::::::: Documents accompanying the President’s Message. [Sen. and H. of R.

2d Session.
ear of the reign of his late Majesty King George the Third,
ntitled “An act for the more speedy trial of offences com-
pitted in §. upon the high seas.”
IV. And be it further enacted, That this act may be amend-
d, altered, or repealed, by any actor acts to be passed in this
resent session of Parliament.
IN SENATE,
Saturday, JMay 8, 1824.
Mr. Barbour, from the Committee on Foreign Rela-
ons, to whom was referred, on the 30th April, the Mes-
ge of the President of the United States of that date,
gether with the Convention with Great Britain, report-
d the same without amendment. The said Convention
as read the second time.
JWednesday, JMay 12, 1824.
The Senate proceeded to consider, as in committee of
he whole, the Convention with Great Britain, concluded
London, the 13th March, 1824; and Ordered, That it
e on the table.
Thursday, JMay 13, 1824.
The Senate resumed, as in committee of the whole,
le consideration of the Convention between the United
lates and Great Britain, and Mr. Barbour proposed the
llowing amendment thereto, which was read:
"Art. XII. This Convention shall continue in force
ntil one of “he parties shall have declared its intention
renounce it; which declaration shall be made at least
kmonths beforehand.” -
JMonday, JMay 17, 1824.
The Senate resumed, as in committee of the whole,
seconsideration of the Convention with Great Britain,
gether with the amendment proposed on the 13th in-
ant; and, on motion, Ordered, That the further consi-
tration thereof be postponed to, and made the order of
e day for, Wednesday next.

Is SENATE of The UNITED STATEs,
.May 21, 1824.

Message from the President of the United States.
| The sex are or The tr. States :
Apprehending, from the delay in the decision, that
me difficulty exists with the Senate, respecting the
lification of the Convention lately concluded with the
itish Government for the suppression of the slave
de, by making it piratical, I deem it proper to com-
unicate, for your consideration, such views as appear
one to merit attention. Charged, as the Executive is,
* I have long been, with maintaining the political re.
ons between the United States and other nations, I
*der it my duty, in submitting for your advice and
ont, as to the ratification, any treaty or convention
oth has been agreed on with another power, to ex-
an. when the occasion requires it, all the reasons
th induced the measure. It is by such full and frank
Planation, only, that the senate can be enabled to
*harge the high trust reposed in them with advantage
or country having the instrument before them,
*the views which guided the Executive in forming
the Senate will possess all the light necessary to a
und decision.
"an act of congress of 15th May, 1820, the slave
* as described by that act, was made piratical, and

* of our citizens as might be found engaged in
at trade, were subjected, on conviction thereof, by the
.." courts of the United States, to capital punish-
o To communicate more, distinctly the import of
*. Irefer to its fourth and fifth sections, which are
“S ollowing words:
on .§ ond be it further enacted, that, if any citi.
Mupan e United states, being of the crew or ship's
ave o any foreign ship or vessel, engaged in the
'shi * or any person whatever, being of the crew

P's company of any ship or vessel, owned in the

whole or part, or navigated for, or in behalf of, any citizen or citizens of the United States, shall land from any such ship or vessel, and on any foreign shore seize, any negro or mulatto, not held to service or labor by the laws of either of the states or territories of the United States, with intent to make such negro or mulatto a slave, or shall decoy, or forcibly bring, or carry, or shall receive, such negro or mulatto, on board any such ship or vessel, with intent as aforesaid, such citizen or person shall be adjudged a pirate, and on conviction thereof, before the circuit court of the United States for the district wherein he may be brought or found, shall suffer death. “Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That, if any citizen of the United States, being of the crew or ship's company of any foreign ship or vessel, engaged in the slave trade, or any person whatever, being of the crew or ship's company of any ship or vessel, owned wholly or in part, or navigated for, or in behalf of any citizen or citizens of the United States, shall forcibly confine or detain, or aid and abet in forcibly confining or detaining, on board such ship or vessel, any negro or mulatto, not held to service by the laws of either of the States or Territories of the United States, with intent to make such negro or mulatto a slave, or shall, on board any such ship or vessel, offer or attempt to sell, as a slave, any negro or mulatto, not held to service as aforesaid, or siyall, on the high seas, or any where on tide water, transfer or deliver over, to any other ship or vessel, any negro or mulatto, not held to service, as aforesaid, with intent to make surch negro or mulatto a slave, or shall land, or deliver on shore from on board any such ship or vessel, any such negro or mulatto, with intent to make sale of, or having previously sold, such negro or mulatto as a slave, such citizen or person shall be adjudged a pirate; and, on conviction thereof, before the Circuit Court of the United States for the district wherein he may be brought or found, shall suffer death.” And on the 28th February, 1823, the House of Representatives, by a majority of 131 to 9, passed a resolution to the following effect: “Resolved, That the President of the United States be requested to enter upon, and prosecute, from time to time, such negotiations with the several maritime powers of Europe and America, as he may deem expedient, for the effectual abolition of the African slave trade, and its ultimate denunciation as Piracy under the law of nations, by the consent of the civilized world.” By the act of Congress above referred to, whereby the most effectual means that could be devised were adopted, for the extirpation of the slave trade, the wish of the United States was explicitly declared, that all nations might concur in a similar policy. It could only be by such concurrence that the great object could be accomplished; and it was by negotiation and treaty, alone, that such concurrence could be obtained, commencing with one power, and extending it to others: The course, therefore, which the Executive, who had concurred in the act, had to pursue, was distinctly marked out for it. Had there, however, been any doubt respecting it, the resolution of the House of Representatives, the branch which might, with strict propriety, express its opinion, could not fail to have removed it. By the tenth article of the treaty of peace between the United States and Great Britain, concluded at Ghent, it was stipulated that both parties should use their best endeavors to accomplish the abolition of the African slave trade. This object has been, accordingly, pursued by both Governments, with great earnestness, by separate acts of legislation, and by negotiation, almost uninterrupted, with the purpose of establishing a concert be. tween them, in some measure, which might secure its accomplishment. Great Britain, in her negotiations with other powers,

had concluded treaties with Spain, Portugal, and the

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Netherlands, in which, without constituting the crime as piracy or classing it with crimes of that denomination, the parties had conceded to the naval officers of each other, the right of search and capture of the vessels of either, that might be engaged in the slave trade, and had instituted courts consisting of judges, subjects of both parties, for the trial of the vessels so captured. In the negotiations with the United States, Great Britain had earnestly and repeatedly pressed on them the adoption of similar provisions. They had been resisted by the Executive, on two grounds: one, that the constitution of mixed tribunals was incompatible with their constitution; and the other, that the concession of the right of search in time of peace, for an offence not piratical, would be repugnant to the feelings of the nation, and of dangerous tendency. The right of search is the right of war, of the belligerant towards the neutral. To extend it, in time of peace, to any object whatever, might establish a precedent which might lead to others with some powers, and which, even if confined to the instance specified, might be subject to great abuse. Animated by an ardent desire to suppress this, trade, the United States took stronger ground, by making it, by the act above referred to, piratical ; a measure more adequate to the end, and free from many of the objections applicable to the plan which had been proposed to them it is this alternative which the Executive, under the sanctions and injunctions above stated, offered to the British Government, and which that Government has accepted. By making the crime piracy, the right of search attaches to the crime, and which, when adopted by all nations, will be common to all ; and that it will be so adopted, may fairly be presumed, if steadily persevered in by the parties to the present convention. In the mean time, and with a view to a fair experiment, the obvious course seems to be, to carry into effect, with every power, such treaty as may be made with each'in succession. in presenting this alternative to the British Government, it was made an indispensable condition, that the trade should be made piratical by act of Parliament, as it had been by an act of Congress. This was provided for in the convention, and has since been complied with. In this respect, therefore, the two nations rest on the same ground. Suitable provisions have also been adopted to protect each party from the abuse of the power granted to the public ships of the other. Instead of subjecting the persons detected in the slave trade to trial by the courts of the captors, as would be the case if such trade was piracy by the law of nations, it is stipulated, that, until that event, they shall be tried by the courts of their own country only. Hence, there could be no motive for an abuse of the right of search, since such abuse could not fail to terminate to the injury of the captor. Should this convention be adopted, there is every reason to believe, that it will be the commencement of a system destined to accomplish the entire abolition of the slave trade. Great Britain, by making it her own, consessedly adopted, at the suggestion of the United States, and being pledged to propose and urge its adoption, by other nations, in concert with the United States, will find it for her interest to abandon the less effective system of her previous treaties with Spain, Portugal, and the Netherlands, and to urge on those and other powers their accession to this. The crime will then be universally proscribed as piracy, and the traffic be suppressed forever. Other considerations of high importance urge the adoption of this convention. We have at this moment pending with Great Britain, sundry other negotiations, intimately connected with the welfare, and even with the peace, of our Union. In one of them, nearly a third part of the territory of the State of Maine is in contestation. In another, the navigation of the St. Law. rence, the admission of consuls into the British islands, and a system of commercial intercourse between the United States and all the British possessions in this he

misphere, are subjects of discussion. In a third, our to: ritorial, and other rights upon the Northwest Coast, an to be adjusted ; while a negotiation on the same inter est is opened with Russia. In a fourth, all the most in portant controvertible points of maritime law, in times war, are brought under consideration ; and, in the fifth the whole system of South American concerns, connett ed with a general recognition of South American Inde |. may, again, from hour to hour, become, asi has already been, an object of concerted operations a the highest interest to both nations, and to the peated the world. It cannot be disguised, that the rejection of thisco vention could not fail to have a very injurious influent. on the good understanding between the two gover ments on all these points. That it would place the E. ecutive administration under embarrassment, and * ject it, the Congress, and the nation, to the charge 4 insincerity, respecting the great result of the final so pression of the slave trade, and that its first and into pensable consequence will be, to constrain the Exo tive to suspend all further negotiation with every to ropean and American power, to which overtures ho been made, in compliance with the resolution oft House of Representatives, of 28th February, 1823, in be obvious. To invite all nations, with the statute piracy in our hands, to adopt its principles as the h" nations, and yet to deny to all the common rigo search for the pirate, whom it would be impossible detect, without entering and searching the ** would expose us, not simply to the charge of ino sistency. It must be obvious, that the restriction of search pirates to the African coast, is incompatible with to idea of crime. It is not doubted, also, if the coo". is adopted, that no example of the commission * * crime, by the citizens or subjects of either powo, o ever occur again. It is believed, therefore, the o right, as applicable to piracy, would not only * the trade, but prove altogether innocent inits opero: In further illustration of the views of Congress." subject, I transmit the Senate extracts from two o; tions of the House of Representatives, one of to: * bruary, 1821, the other of 12th April, 1822. itro also, a letter from the Charge d'Affaires of to: Government, which shews the deep interest whicht Government takes in the ratification of the to JAMES MONR0

Washington, 21st. May, 1824. Extract of a report of the 9th of February, to: House of Representatives, by the Commito town had been referred so much of the President” fo as relates to the slave trade, and to which wo red the two messages of the President, o in pursuance of the resolution of the House to sentatives, of the 4th of December, a repo o Secretary of State, and enclosed documo to the negotiation for the suppression of trade. - send “the detestable crime of kidnapping the "". at inhabitants of one country, and chaining them . po in another, is marked with all the atrol. by wo cy, . as such, it is stigmatized and pun" d own laws. er “To efface this reproachful stainstom the . civilized mankind, would be the proude" tro §o could be achieved in the cause of huma". owest" subject, the United States, having led!” o themselves to give their influence an o: great tion to any measure that will accomplish o: has do good purpose; but this happy result, es. except" monstrated, cannot be realized by any ... shi's concession by the maritime powers to each 0 of war of a qualified right of search.

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“if this object was generally attained, it is confidently believed that the active exertions of even a few nations, would be sufficient entirely to suppress the slave trade.”

Extract from a report made April 12, 1822, by the Committee on the Suppression of the Slave Trade, to whom had been referred a resolution of the House of Representatives, of the 15th of January preceding, instructing them to inquire whether the laws of the U. States, prohibiting that traffic, have been duly executed; also, into the general operation thereof, and if any defects exist in those laws, to suggest adequate remedies therefor, and to whom many memorials have been referred touching the same subject. "But the conclusion to which your Committee has arrived, after consulting all the evidence within their reach, is that the African slave trade now prevails to a out extent, and that its total suppression can never be tfected by the separate and disunited efforts of one or more of the states: and, as the resolution to which this Mootrefers, requires the suggestion of some remedy *the defects, if any exist, in the system of laws for he oppression of this traffic, your committee beg leave still the attention of the House to the report and ac*mpanying documents submitted to the last Congress, of the Committee on the Slave Trade, and to make the one apart of this report. That report proposes, as a omedy for the existing evils of the system, the concuronce of the United States with one or all the maritime *wers of Europe, in a modified and reciprocal right of oth on the African coast, with a view to the total suposion of the slave trade. "his with great delicacy that the committee have ap*ached this subject, because they are aware that the onedy which they have presumed to recommend to the *sideration of the House, requires the exercise of a *er of another department of this government, and objections to the exercise of this power, in the *here proposed, have hitherto existed in that deortment. "Your committee are confident, however, that these *tions apply rather to a particular proposition for the *hange of the right of search, than to that modifica*of it which presents itself to your committee. They *mplate the trial and condemnation of such Ameri**tizens as may be found engaged in this forbidden hde, no: by mixed tribunals, sitting in a foreign couno, but by existing courts, of competent jurisdiction, ** United States; they propose the same disposition "the captured Africans, now authorized by law, and, *...of all, their detention in America. They contemplate an exchange of this right, which hall be, in all respects, reciprocal—an exchange which, *ing its sole authority from treaty, would exclude *Pretension, which no nation, however, has presumed *t up, that this right can be derived from the law of *s, and, further, they have limited it in their con**on of its application, not only to certain latitudes, ** a certain'distance from the coast of Africa, but to a o number of vessels to be employed by each power, o to be previously designated. The visit and search, | **stricted, it is believed, would ensure the co-opera. one great maritime power in the proposed ex*ge, and guard it from the danger of abuse. A "our committee cannot doubt that the people of o have the intelligence to distinguish between o: of searching a neutral on the high seas, in time o * claimed by some belligerants, and that mutual, *icted, and peaceful concession, by treaty, suggested :*Committee, and which is demanded in the name of suffering humanity.” *F. Mddingdon to the Secretary of State. WashingtoN, JMay 16, 1824.

Sun: Nearly three weeks have now elapsed since I

had the honor of making my first communication to you on the subject of the convention, concluded on the 13th of March last, between the British government and the American Envoy in London. At that time, in pursuance of instructions conveyed to me from his Majesty's Secretary of State for Foreign Af. fairs, I made known to you the earnest desire of the British government, that no time should be lost by that of the United States in proceeding to the ratification of that instrument, in order that it might be returned to England in time to have it submitted to Parliament prior to its prorogation, which was expected to take place at an early period. I flattered myself, sir, that the wish, thus anxiously expressed by me on behalf of his Majesty's Government, would meet with a corresponding order on the part of all the authorities to whom it was addressed, especially considering that the project of the convention originated with this Government, at the instigation of the House of Representatives, and that his Majesty's ministers had not hesitated an instant to comply with the preliminary act desired by the President, of procuring the passage of a bill through Parliament, denouncing as piracy by statute, the African slave trade, when exercised by British subjects. This consideration, sir, necessarily precludes my entertaining a doubt as to the eventual ratification of the convention by this government, and I therefore attribute the delay which has hitherto occurred, to the pressure of other business, which it would have been found inconvenient to postpone. I think it my duty, however, to press once more, and in the most earnest manner, upon your attention, the anxiety of the British government on this subject. Of this anxiety, a most convincing proof may be found, in the circumstance of an extra packet having been dispatched, by them, for the sole purpose of conveying to this country the act of Parliament declaring the slave trade piracy, immediately after its passage through both Houses, in order that the want of that document might not oppose any obstacle to the sanction of the convention, by this Government. Perhaps, sir, you will allow me to add, that I now detain that same packet for the express purpose of reconveying the instrument in question, as soon as ratified, with the utmost possible celerity, to England. I have the honor to be, with distinguished considera" tion, sir, your most obedient humble servant, H. U. ADDINGTON. Hon. John Q. ADAMs, Secretary of State.

IN SENATE–Farbay, JMay 21, 1824. Agreeably to the order of the day, the Senate resumed, as in committee of the whole, the consideration of the Convention with Great Britain, together with the amendment proposed on the 13th instant; and the amendment having been modified, as follows: Provided, That an article be added, whereby it shall be free to either of the parties, at any time, to renounce the said convention, giving six months' notice beforehand : On the question to agree thereto, it was determined in the affirmative, yeas 36, nays 2. Those who voted in the affirmative, are, Messrs. Barbour, Barton, Bell, Benton, Branch, Brown, Clayton, Eaton, Edwards, Elliott, Findlay, Gaillard, Hayne, Holmes, of Maine, Holmes, of Mississippi, Jackson, Johnson, of Kentucky, Henry Johnson, Josiah S. Johnston, Kelly, King, of Alab. King, of N. Y. Knight, Lloyd, of Mass. Lowrie, McIlvaine, Macon, Mills, Palmer, Parrott, Ruggles, Seymour, Taylor, of Wa. Thomas, Van Dyke, Williams. Those who voted in the negative, are, Messrs. Chandler and D’Wolf. And no furthcramendment having been made, the Convention was reported to the Senate. On the question to concur in the amendment made in committee of the whole, to wit:

18th Congress, ; Documents accompanying the President’s Message. [ Sen. and H. of R

2d Session.

Lusert at the end of the resolution for the ratification of the

Convention, Provided, That an article be added, whereby it shall be free to either of the parties, at any time, to renounce the said Convention, giving six months' notice beforehand, It was determined in the affirmative, yens 34, nays 2. Those who voted in the affirmative, are, Messrs. Barbour, Barton, Bell, Bentou, Branch, Brown, Clayton, Eaton, Edwards, Eliott, Findlay, Gaillard, Hayne, Holmes of Maine, Holmes of Miss, Jackson, Johnson of Ken., Josiah S. Johnston, Kelly, King of Alab. King of N.Y Knight, Lloyd of Mass. Howrie, McIlvaine, Macon, Mills, Parrott, Ruggles, Seymour, Taylor of Wa. Thomas, Van Dyke, and Williams. Those who voted in the negative, are, Messrs. Chandler and D’Wolf. Ordered, That the Convention pass to a third reading. SATURDAY, May 22, 1824. The Convention with Great Britain was read the third time; whereupon, Mr. Barbour submitted the following motion for consideration, which was read: Resolved, Two-thirds of the Senators present concurring therein, That the Senate do advise and consent to the ratification of the Convention made and concluded at London, the thirteenth day of March, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-four, between the United States of America and the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland: Provided, That an article be added, whereby it shall be free to either of the parties, at any time, to renounce the said Convention, giving six months' notice beforehand. On motion, by Mr. Macon, to postpone the further consideration of the Convention to the first Monday in December next, it was determined in the negative, yeas 16, nays 26. The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the Senators present, Those who voted in the affirmative, are, Messrs. Bell, Brown, Chandler, D'Wolf, Dickerson, Flliott,Caillard, Holmes of Maine, Knight, Lowrie, Macon, Ruggles, Smith, Thomas, Van Buren, and Ware, Those who voted in the negative, are, Messrs. Barbour, Barton, Benton, Branch, Clayton, Eaton, Edwards, Findlay, Hayne, Holmes of Miss. Jackson, Johnson of Ken. Henry Johnson, Josiah S. Johnston, Kelly, King of N. Y. Lloyd of Mass. McIlvaine, Mills, Noble, Parrott, Seymour, Taylor of Ind. Taylor of Wa. Van Dyke, and Williams. On motion by Mr. Josiah S. Johnston, to strike out of the Convention, art. 1, line 4, the words “of America”—On the question “Shall these words stand as part of the article?” it was determined in the negative, yeas 23, nays 20. Those who voted in the affirmative, are, Messrs. Barbour, Barton, Clayton, Eaton, Edwards, Findlay, Hayne, Holities of Miss. Jackson, Johnson of Ken. Henry Johnson, Kelly, King of N. Y. Lloyd of Mass. McIlvaine, Mills, Noble, Parrott, Seymour, Taylor of Ind. Taylor of Wa. Van Dyke, and Williams. Those who voted in the negative, are, Messrs. Bell, Benton, Branch, Brown, Chandler, D’Wolf, Dickerson, Plliott. Gaillard, Holmes of Maine, Josiah S. Johnston, King of Alabama, Rnight, Lowrie, Macon, Ruggles, Smith, Thomas, Van Buren, and Ware. On motion of Mr. Josiah S. Johnston, to strike out, art.1, line 5, the words “and of the West Indies”— On the question “Shall these words stand as part of the article * it was determined in the affirmative, yeas 29, nays 14. Those who voted in the affirmative, are, Messrs. Barbour, Darton, Benton, Brown, Clayton, Eaton, Fúwards, Findlay, Hayne, Holmes of Miss. Jackson, Johnson of Ken. Henry Johnson, Kelly, King of N. Y. Knight, Lloyd of Mass. Lowrie, McIlvaine, Macon, Mills, Noble. Parrott, Ruggles, Seymour, Taylor. of Ind. Taylor of Va. Van Dyke, and Williams. Those who voted in the negative, are, Messrs. Bell, Branch, Chandler, D'Wolf, Dickerson, Elliott, Gaillard, Holmes of Maine, Josiah S. Johnston, King of Alab. Smith, Thomas, Va. Buren, and Ware. A motion was made by Mr. Josiah S. Johnston, to strike out the second article; and, on the question “Will the Senate advise and consent to the ratification of this article?” it was determined in the negative, yeas?7, nays 16. Those who voted in the affirmative, are, Messrs. Barbour, Barton, Benton, Branch, Clayton, Faton, Edwards, Findlay, Hayne, Holm's of Miss. Jackson, Johnson of Ken. Henry Johnson, Kelly, King of N. Y. Knight, Lloyd of Mass. McIl

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vaine, Mills, Noble, Parrott, Ruggies, Seymour, Taylor of Int Taylor of Wa. Van Dyke, and Williams. #. who voted in the negative, are, Messrs. Bell, Brown Chandler, D'Wolf, Dickerson, Elliott, Gaillard, Holmes: Maine, J. S. Johnston, King of Alab. Lowrie, Macon, Smith Thomas, Van Buren, and "Ware. On motion, to strike out of the 7th article the followin words : “And it is further agreed, that any individual, being a to zen or subject of either of the two contracting parties, *h shall be found on board any vessel, not carrying the flag of th other party, nor belonging to the subjects or citizens of either but engaged in the illicit traffic of slaves, and seized or to demned on that account, by the cruisers of the other paro under circumstances which, by involvingsnch individual into guilt of slave trading, would subject him to the penalto of piracy, he shall be sent for trial before the competent tour in the country to which he belongs, and the reasonable expro es of any witnesses belonging to the captured vessel, in pro ing to the place of trial, during their detection there, and so their return to their own country, or to their station in itsko vice, shall, in every such case, be allowed by the court, so defrayed by the country in which the trial takes place." On the question, “Shall these words stand as part of the ar. ticle 7" it was determined in the negative, yeaso, nays ol. those who voted in the affirmative, are, Messrs. Barto, Benton, Clayton, Eaton, Edwards, Findlay, Hayne, Homo Miss Jackson, Johnson of Ken. Henry Johnson, Kelly, ho of N. Y. Knight, M*Ilvaine, Mills, Noble, Parrott, Seymo Taylor, of Va. Van Dyke, and Williams. ‘ihole who voted in the negative, are, Messrs. Bo Bell, branch, Brown, Chandler, D'Wolf, Dickerson, o' Gaillard, 31olmes of Maine, Josiah S. Johnston, King of Ala Lloyd of Mass. Lowrie, Macon, Ruggles, Smith, Taylorofluo. Thomas, Van Buren, and ware. d On the question to agree to the resolution, amended attor" ingly, for the ratification of the Convention, It was determined in the affirmative, yeas 29, nays 13. Those who voted in the affirmative, are, Messrs o Barton, Benton, Branch, Brown, Clayton, Eaton, Elwork. Findlay, Hayne, Holmes of Miss. Jackson, Johnso. Henry Johnson, Josiah S. Johnston, Kelly, Koło of N.Y. Knight, Lloyd of Mass. Lowrie, McIlvaine. * Parrott, Seymour, Taylor of Ind. Taylor of Wa. Van Diko. and Williams. those who voted in the negative, are, Messrs. Bell, o ler, D'wolf, Dickerson, Elliott, Gaillard, Holmes of " Macon Ruggles, Smith, Thomas, Van Buren, and Ware. . So it was resolved, two-thirds of the Senators pro: curring therein, That the Senate do advise and conso." o | ratification of the Convention made and conclude"." ls. the 13th day of March, one thousand eight hundred and o o ty-four, between the United States of America and ". o: of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. o exception of the words “of America,” in line four. " o article; with the exception of the second olo". following words in the seventh article: “A” " o o agreed, that any individual, being a citizen or subject o o of the two contracting parties, who shall be found on ;: vessel, not carrying the flag of the other party, or . o to the subjects or citizens of either, but engaged in *. traffic of slaves, and seized or condemned on that o the eruisers of the other party, under circumstano." ". involving such individual in the guilt of slave o subject him to the penalties of piracy, he shall be o o before the competent court in the country to which he . and the reasonable expenses of any witnesses, o: the capturing vessel, in proceeding to the place of ural dur or detention there, and for their return to their "" o i. to their station in its service, shall, in every s” jo lowed by the court, and defoyed by theo f o trial takes places” Provided, That an article be alle time, by it shall be free to either of the parties...'...' renounce the said Convention, giving six months' n forehand.

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