The Finances and Public Works of India from 1869 to 1881

Forside
K. Paul, Trench & Company, 1882 - 467 sider
 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 408 - In the particular circumstances of a given age or nation, there is scarcely anything, really important to the general interest, which it may not be desirable, or even necessary, that the government should take upon itself, not because private individuals cannot effectually perform it, but because they will not.
Side 408 - ... action to be capable of the means. This is true, more or less, of all countries inured to despotism, and particularly of those in which there is a very wide distance in civilization between the people and the government : as in those which have been conquered and are retained in subjection by a more energetic and more cultivated people.
Side 137 - They had a purse to draw upon of unlimited because unknown depth. They saw on every side the necessity for improvements, and their constant and justifiable desire was to obtain for their own provinces and people as large a share as they could persuade the Government of India to give them out of the general revenues of the empire.
Side 408 - ... there is scarcely anything, really important to the general interest, which it may not be desirable, or even necessary, that the government should take upon itself, not because private individuals cannot effectually perform it, but because they will not. At some times and places there will be no roads, docks, harbours, canals, works of irrigation, hospitals, schools, colleges...
Side 137 - The distribution of the public income,' General Strachey wrote, ' degenerates into something like a scramble, in which the most violent has the advantage, with very little attention to reason ; as local economy leads to no local advantage, the stimulus to avoid waste is reduced to a minimum...
Side 330 - ... the country people who had in return the privilege of using the town market; above all it was the old customary tax of India. The Government of India, which always had its suspicions about this tax, as it was contrary to the English tradition of local taxation and freedom of trade, wrote in 1868: "It is to little purpose that the imperial government reduces or abolishes customs duties in the interests of trade if municipalities are permitted to levy duties on articles of commerce passing through...
Side 295 - ... almost total abolition of customs duties, which of all Indian taxes are probably the worst. The cotton duties are virtually dead, and the other import duties cannot long survive them. How long a period may elapse before such a consummation is reached cannot be predicted ; but the time is not very far distant when the ports of India will be thrown open freely to the commerce of the world. ' The people of India consume at present hardly any foreign luxuries ; and cotton goods, which are among the...
Side 411 - This applies to the case of a road, a canal, or a railway. These are always in a great degree practical monopolies, and a government which concedes such monopoly unreservedly to a private company, does much the same thing as if it allowed an individual or an association to levy any tax they chose for their own benefit on all the tnalt produced in the country, or on all the cotton imported into it.
Side 134 - It controlled the smallest details of every branch of the expenditure ; its authority was required for the employment of every person paid with public money, however small his salary ; and its sanction was necessary for the grant of funds even for purely local works of improvement, for every local road, and every building, however insignificant.
Side 138 - Governments led to still more serious evils. Constant differences of opinion about petty details of expenditure, and constant interference of the Government of India in matters of trivial importance, brought with them, as a necessary consequence, frequent conflicts with the Local Governments regarding questions of provincial administration of which they were the best judge, and of which the Government of India could know little.

Bibliografisk informasjon