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SCHOOL

GREEK GRAMMAR

BY

WILLIAM W. GOODWIN, LL.D.,

ELIOT FROFESSOR OF GREEK LITERATURE IN HARVARD COLLEGE,

AUTHOR OF “SYNTAX OF THE MOODS AND TENSES OF THE GREEK VERB," ETC.

London
MACMILLAN AND CO.

The Right of Translation and Reproduction is Reserved

Edut T21118.82.430
Elu L 81682

Barvard College Library

Dec, 24, 1914
From the ES ate of
Pro. W. W. Goodwin

1 1

LONDON:
R. CLAY, SONS, AND TAYLOR,

BREAD STREET HILL.

PREFACE.

THIS work is an abridgment of the author's Greek Grammar which was published in 1879 in London and in Boston, U.S. The larger work was written primarily for the higher classes of classical schools, in the hope that it might supply the wants (for both study and reference) of even the best scholars until the beginning of their university studies. At the same time, it was thought that the parts in larger type with the paradigms could be used to advantage even with beginners in Greek. The author's experience with a much smaller grammar in the United States had shown that nearly all classical teachers there preferred to use the same text-book in all their classes, and that the grammar with which a boy began his study of Greek and Latin at school was generally carried to college, and was not always discarded even there.

This abridgment is intended for those who wish to begin the study of Greek with a small book, with the expectation of using a larger grammar after the elements are mastered. With this idea nearly all the notes which were intended for reference in the larger grammar have been omitted, and the other parts have been condensed as far as was consistent with clearness. Even now, the distinction of type will enable any teacher to make a still more elementary grammar of the present work. It must be distinctly understood, however, that this volume is utterly insufficient for all whose studies extend beyond ordinary Attic prose, although the brief sections on Homeric forms may enable younger pupils to read a little Homer with the help of a good teacher and a Homeric lexicon. All account of the Metres is therefore excluded, and most dialectic and poetic forms are omitted in the Catalogue of Verbs.

It has been the author's object to state the fundamental principles of Greek Grammar accurately and fully, so that the pupil may at least have nothing to unlearn hereafter. He has not thought it possible to do this in less space than is here given to the subject, believing that greater brevity would involve increased obscurity, and make the book really more difficult for beginners. To most of the principles here stated, however, many real or apparent exceptions occur, which cannot be included in a book like this; but when a pupil begins to notice these, he has already outgrown this abridgment.

Teachers are referred to the Preface of the larger grammar for an explanation of many points in the treatment of the subject which may be new to them, for a

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