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82. The Sabbath School Teacher . . . James. 227

83. Motives of the Gospel . . . . Dwight. 228

84. Character of Richard Reynolds . . Thorpe. 230

85. Address of the Bible Society—1816 . . Mason. 231

86. Roman Soldier; -—Last days of Herculaneum fltherstone, 232

87. The Orphan Boy . . . Mrs. Opie. 235

88. Christian Consolation . . . . 236

89. Cruelty to Animals . . . . Cowper. 237

90. Christianity . . . . . Mason. 238

91. Character of Mrs. Graham . . . Mason. 240

92. Livin to God . . . . . Griflin. 241

93. Plea or Africa . . . . . Griflin. 243

94. Abolition of the Slave Trade . . Christian Obs. 245

95. Eliza . . . . . . Darwin. 246

96. Character of Mr. Brougham . . . . 248

97. Character of Mr. Wilberforce . . . 250

98. Eulo ‘um on Mr. Fox . . . . Sheridan. 251

99. Deat of Sheridan . ‘ . . . . Byron. 252

100. The last family of Eastern Greenland . Montgomer . 254

101. The City and the Country . . M’Donnoug . 255

102. Summary Punishment . . . . Scott. 257

103. On the receipt of his Mother‘s Picture . Cowper. 258

104. Extract from “ The Grave ” . . Montgomery. 259

105. Defence of Johnson . . . . Curran. 260

106. Takin rsaw . . . . Campbell. 262

.107. Lord . . . . . Butler. 263

108. Mr. Po r. Pitt . . . , . Butler. 265

109. D 0 0rd Chatham . . ' . Percy. 266

110. (1 Mansfield . . . , . . Pere . 268

111. ' rovidential Distinctions . . . Pollo . 270

112. Eloquence 0f Bossuet . . . . Butler. 27]

113. Eloquence of Bourdaloue . . . Butler. 273

114. Eloquence of Bridaine . . . . Butler. 275

115. Eloquence of Whitefield . . . Gillies. 276

116. Satan’s Lamentation . . . . Milton. 278

117. Eloquence of Sheridan . . . . . 280

118. Spirit of the American Revolution . J. Quincy, Jr. 282

119. America . . . . . . Philips. 284 .

120. Patri ' of 1775 . . 'e . . P. Henry. 286

121. The ' tented Pendulum . . Jane Taylor. 289

122. Val ' Hymn . . . . JV'. fldams. 292

123. Scene in Pizarro . . . Kotzelme. 293

124. Goo . . . . . Derzhanir. 297

125. The Dead Sea . . . . . Croly. 299

126. New Missionary Hymn . . S. F. Smith. 300

APPENDIX . . . . . . . 301

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THE

RHETORICAL READER.

CHAPTER I. READING. ITS CONNEXION WITH GOOD EDUCATION.

THE art of reading well is indispensable to one who expects to be a public speaker; vbecause the principles on 'which it depends are the same as those which belong to rhetorical delivery in general, and because nearly all bad speakers were prepared to be so, by early mismanagement of the voice in reading.

But the subject is one of common interest to all, who aim at a good education. Every intelligent father, who would have his son or daughter qualified to hold a respectable rank in well-bred society, will regard it mong the very first of polite accomplishments, that Qhould' be able to read well. But beyond this, the tale ay be applied to many important purposes of business, of rational entertainment, and of religious duty. Of the multitudes who are not called to speak in public, including the whole of one sex, and all but comparatively a few of the other, there‘ is no one to whom the ability'to read in a graceful and impressive manner, may not be of great value. In this country, then, where the advantages of educat' are open to all, and where it is a primary object with pQ of all classes, to have their children well instructed, it ld seem reasonable to presume that nearly all our youth, of both sexes, must be good readers. Yet the number who can

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